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Morris Halle (/ˈhæli/; July 23, 1923 – April 2, 2018) was a Latvian-American linguist who was an Institute Professor, and later professor emeritus, of linguistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was best known for his pioneering work in generative phonology, having written "On Accent and Juncture in English" in 1956 with Noam Chomsky and Fred Lukoff and The Sound Pattern of English in 1968 with Chomsky. He also co-authored (with Samuel Jay Keyser) the earliest theory of generative metrics.

Morris Halle
Morris Halle.jpg
Halle in 2011
Born Morris Pinkowitz
(1923-07-23)July 23, 1923
Liepāja, Latvia
Died April 2, 2018(2018-04-02) (aged 94)
Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.
Alma mater Harvard, Columbia University, University of Chicago, City College of New York
Scientific career
Fields Phonology, morphology, generative grammar
Institutions MIT
Doctoral advisor Roman Jakobson

Life and careerEdit

Halle was born Morris Pinkowitz (Latvian: Moriss Pinkovics) to a Jewish family in Liepāja, Latvia, in July 1923, and moved with his family to Riga in 1929.[1] They arrived in the United States in 1940. From 1941 to 1943, he studied engineering at the City College of New York. He entered the United States Army in 1943 and was discharged in 1946, at which point he went to the University of Chicago, where he got his master's degree in linguistics in 1948. He then studied at Columbia University under Roman Jakobson, became a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1951, and earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1955. He retired from MIT in 1996, but he remained active in research and publication. He was fluent in German, Yiddish, Latvian, Russian, Hebrew and English.

Halle was married for fifty-six years to artist Rosamond Thaxter Strong Halle, until her death in April 2011.

Halle resided in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He died in April 2018 at the age of 94.[2]

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