Moritz Leuenberger

Moritz Leuenberger (born 21 September 1946) is a Swiss politician and lawyer who served as a Member of the Swiss Federal Council from 1995 to 2010. A member of the Social Democratic Party (SP/PS), he was President of the Swiss Confederation in 2001 and 2006. Leuenberger headed the Federal Department of Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications for the whole of his tenure as a Federal Councillor.

Moritz Leuenberger
Moritz Leuenberger, 2009.jpg
President of Switzerland
In office
1 January 2006 – 31 December 2006
Vice PresidentMicheline Calmy-Rey
Preceded bySamuel Schmid
Succeeded byMicheline Calmy-Rey
In office
1 January 2001 – 31 December 2001
Vice PresidentKaspar Villiger
Preceded byAdolf Ogi
Succeeded byKaspar Villiger
Vice President of Switzerland
In office
1 January 2010 – 1 November 2010
PresidentDoris Leuthard
Preceded byDoris Leuthard
Succeeded byMicheline Calmy-Rey
In office
1 January 2005 – 31 December 2005
PresidentSamuel Schmid
Preceded bySamuel Schmid
Succeeded byMicheline Calmy-Rey
In office
1 January 2000 – 1 December 2000
PresidentAdolf Ogi
Preceded byAdolf Ogi
Succeeded byKaspar Villiger
Member of the Swiss Federal Council
In office
1 January 1995 – 1 November 2010
Preceded byOtto Stich
Succeeded bySimonetta Sommaruga
Head of the Department of Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications
In office
1 January 1995 – 1 November 2010
Preceded byAdolf Ogi
Succeeded byDoris Leuthard
Personal details
Born (1946-09-21) 21 September 1946 (age 75)
Biel, Switzerland
Political partySocial Democratic Party
Spouse(s)Gret Loewensberg
Residence(s)Zürich
Alma materUniversity of Zurich
Signature

CareerEdit

 
2001 Swiss Federal Council
 
2006 Swiss Federal Council

A lawyer by occupation, Moritz Leuenberger managed his firm in Zürich until 1991. He was successively elected to the Zürich City Council (1974–1983), National Council (1979–1995) and Zürich Cantonal Government (1991–1995), where he headed the Department of Home Affairs and Justice. He presided over Mieterverband, the Swiss tenants' association, from 1972 to 1991.

Leuenberger was elected to the Federal Council on 27 September 1995 as a member of the Social Democratic Party, succeeding Otto Stich. He became head of the Federal Department of Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications; the name of the department was changed in 1998 to incorporate the term "Environment".

At a ceremony in Brussels, the Community of European Railways and Union des Industries Ferroviaires Européennes presented the 2009 European Railway Awards on 20 January 2009. Leuenberger was presented with the Political Award for his work to build and maintain a sustainable transportation policy.[1][2]

On 9 July 2010 Leuenberger announced he would leave the Federal Council as of 31 December 2010.[3] At this time Hans-Rudolf Merz had been expected to resign as well and there were talks between the two about resigning together. Leuenberger's resignation however came as a surprise.[4] One month later, on 6 August 2010, Merz also announced his resignation for October.[5] This led to the situation that the parliament would have had to elect a new Federal Councillor both in September and November. To avoid this situation, Leuenberger then announced he would change his resignation to allow for just one election for both new Federal Councillors.[6]

Personal lifeEdit

Moritz Leuenberger is the son of theologian Robert Leuenberger. He has been married to architect Gret Loewensberg since 2003 and has two sons.

WorksEdit

  • Die Rose und der Stein : Grundwerte in der Tagespolitik: Reden und Texte, Zürich 2002. ISBN 3-85791-399-1
  • Träume und Traktanden – Reden und Texte, 6. Aufl., Zürich 2002. ISBN 3-85791-348-7

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "European rail sector celebrates European Railway Award 2009" (PDF) (Press release). CER and UNIFE. 20 January 2009. Retrieved 16 February 2009.
  2. ^ "Leuenberger picks up railway award". Swissinfo. 20 January 2009. Retrieved 16 February 2009.
  3. ^ "Long-serving Swiss cabinet minister resigns". Swissinfo. 9 July 2010. Retrieved 10 August 2010.
  4. ^ "Leuenberger durchkreuzt Merz' Pläne". NZZ. 11 July 2010. Retrieved 10 August 2010.
  5. ^ "Embattled finance minister bows out". Swissinfo. 6 August 2010. Retrieved 10 August 2010.
  6. ^ "Bundesratsrücktritte als Ärgernis". NZZ. 10 August 2010. Retrieved 10 August 2010.

External linksEdit

Political offices
Preceded by Member of the Swiss Federal Council
1995–2010
Succeeded by
Preceded by President of the Confederation
2001
Succeeded by
Preceded by President of the Confederation
2006
Succeeded by