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Monroe County is a county in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 13,502.[1] Its county seat is Union.[2]

Monroe County, West Virginia
Sweet Springs Resort - Main Building.jpg
Map of West Virginia highlighting Monroe County
Location within the U.S. state of West Virginia
Map of the United States highlighting West Virginia
West Virginia's location within the U.S.
Founded14 January 1799
Named forJames Monroe
SeatUnion
Largest townPeterstown
Area
 • Total474 sq mi (1,228 km2)
 • Land473 sq mi (1,225 km2)
 • Water0.9 sq mi (2 km2), 0.2%
Population (est.)
 • (2017)13,402
 • Density28.3/sq mi (10.9/km2)
Congressional district3rd
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.monroecountywv.net

Monroe County was the home of Andrew Summers Rowan of Spanish–American War fame, who is immortalized in Elbert Hubbard's classic A Message to Garcia. The county was also the site of the 1928 discovery of the 34.48 carat (6.896 g) Jones Diamond by Grover C. Jones and William "Punch" Jones.

Monroe County celebrates its own holiday, Farmers' Day, and is known for its close community.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Monroe County was created from Greenbrier County on 14 January 1799, and was named for Virginia civic figure James Monroe, who would be elected fifth President of the United States in November 1816.[3]

GeographyEdit

Monroe County lies on the southeast side of West Virginia. Its southeast border abuts the northwest border of the state of Virginia. The New River flows northward for a short distance along the county's southwest border. The county's terrain is mountainous and tree-covered, with all more-level surfaces devoted to agriculture.[4] The terrain slopes to the north and west, with its highest part the middle part of its border with Virginia, at 3,862' (1177m) ASL.[5] The county has a total area of 474 square miles (1,230 km2), of which 473 square miles (1,230 km2) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km2) (0.2%) is water.[6]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

WatershedsEdit

Tributaries of the James River, part of the Chesapeake Bay

Tributaries of the New River

Tributaries of the Greenbrier River

National Natural LandmarkEdit

National protected areasEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
18004,188
18105,44430.0%
18206,62021.6%
18307,79817.8%
18408,4228.0%
185010,20421.2%
186010,7575.4%
187011,1243.4%
188011,5013.4%
189012,4298.1%
190013,1305.6%
191013,055−0.6%
192013,1410.7%
193011,949−9.1%
194013,57713.6%
195013,123−3.3%
196011,584−11.7%
197011,272−2.7%
198012,87314.2%
199012,406−3.6%
200014,58317.5%
201013,502−7.4%
Est. 201713,402[8]−0.7%
US Decennial Census[9]
1790–1960[10] 1900–1990[11]
1990–2000[12] 2010–2015[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 14,583 people, 5,447 households, and 3,883 families in the county. The population density was 30.8/sqmi (11.9/km²). There were 7,267 housing units at an average density of 15.4/sqmi (5.93/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 92.67% White, 5.98% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.03% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. 0.49% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,447 households out of which 29.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.80% were married couples living together, 7.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.70% were non-families. 25.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.88.

The county population contained 20.10% under the age of 18, 8.10% from 18 to 24, 30.30% from 25 to 44, 26.10% from 45 to 64, and 15.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 79.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 73.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $27,575, and the median income for a family was $35,299. Males had a median income of $25,643 versus $22,104 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,435. About 12.60% of families and 16.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.30% of those under age 18 and 12.30% of those age 65 or over.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 13,502 people, 5,655 households, and 3,915 families in the county.[13] The population density was 28.5/sqmi (11.0/km²). There were 7,601 housing units at an average density of 16.1/sqmi (6.20/km²).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 97.5% white, 0.7% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 0.1% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.6% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 19.5% were Irish, 16.7% were English, 16.3% were German, 10.4% were American, and 5.7% were Scotch-Irish.[15]

Of the 5,655 households, 27.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.7% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.8% were non-families, and 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.85. The median age was 45.0 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,574 and the median income for a family was $45,106. Males had a median income of $35,709 versus $23,782 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,927. About 10.3% of families and 13.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.1% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.[16]

PoliticsEdit

Monroe County was strongly pro-Confederate during the Virginia Secession Convention.[17] It voted Democratic consistently up until voting for William McKinley in 1900, but since then has leaned Republican except during Democratic landslides, and like all of West Virginia has become overwhelmingly Republican in the twenty-first century due to declining unionization[18] and differences with the Democratic Party’s liberal views on social issues.[19]

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results[20]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 75.9% 4,443 19.0% 1,111 5.1% 298
2012 69.1% 3,616 27.8% 1,455 3.1% 161
2008 60.9% 3,397 36.1% 2,014 2.9% 164
2004 60.3% 3,590 38.8% 2,311 0.8% 50
2000 57.2% 2,940 40.8% 2,094 2.1% 105
1996 41.9% 2,131 46.8% 2,382 11.4% 579
1992 42.6% 2,311 44.6% 2,418 12.8% 691
1988 52.6% 2,719 47.0% 2,427 0.4% 22
1984 60.7% 3,612 39.2% 2,333 0.2% 9
1980 49.4% 2,999 47.4% 2,877 3.2% 196
1976 45.5% 2,750 54.5% 3,297
1972 63.7% 3,716 36.3% 2,114
1968 49.7% 2,925 41.0% 2,412 9.4% 553
1964 41.5% 2,385 58.5% 3,367
1960 51.9% 3,139 48.1% 2,910
1956 56.0% 3,529 44.0% 2,772
1952 54.7% 3,447 45.3% 2,856
1948 52.9% 2,956 47.1% 2,632
1944 54.5% 3,130 45.5% 2,615
1940 50.9% 3,403 49.1% 3,283
1936 48.8% 3,268 51.0% 3,413 0.2% 14
1932 47.7% 2,978 52.3% 3,267 0.0% 2
1928 56.1% 3,025 43.5% 2,346 0.3% 17
1924 50.0% 2,713 49.5% 2,686 0.6% 31
1920 54.3% 3,001 45.5% 2,519 0.2% 12
1916 49.5% 1,584 50.3% 1,609 0.3% 8
1912 25.5% 798 50.2% 1,570 24.3% 759

Government and infrastructureEdit

FPC AldersonEdit

The Federal Bureau of Prisons' Federal Prison Camp, Alderson was the nation's first women's federal prison.[21] It is located in Monroe and Summers counties, west of Alderson.[22][23]

Natural LandmarksEdit

One of Monroe County's geological features is Haynes Cave, a former saltpeter mine.[24] Workers in the mine found strange bones in the cave at the end of the 18th Century, and mailed them to Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson's study of the animal, the Megalonyx jeffersonii was arguably the birth of American paleontology. It is now the official West Virginia state fossil.

However, other saltpeter caves are in private ownership, and allow only limited public access due to ecological risks. One such is the Greenville Saltpeter Cave, designated a national natural landmark in 1973, and very important during the War of 1812.[25][26][27]

Historic LandmarksEdit

EducationEdit

Monroe County Schools operates public schools:

Farmers' DayEdit

Farmers' Day is an annual event, held on the first Saturday in June in Union, to recognize the farming families in the surrounding area. The event, founded by Louie H. Peters, fills the weekend, with a Friday dance, a Saturday pancake breakfast and parade, and Sunday activities.

CommunitiesEdit

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 15, 2011. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 7 June 2011.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 1 June 2013. Retrieved 29 January 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ a b Monroe County WV Google Maps (accessed 12 April 2019)
  5. ^ "Find an Altitude/Monroe County WV" Google Maps (accessed 12 April 2019)
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved July 30, 2015.
  7. ^ "WV MetroNews – Judge rules not enough evidence to kick WV pipeline protesters out of trees". wvmetronews.com. Retrieved 28 June 2018.
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved 12 April 2019.
  9. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  11. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  13. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Retrieved 3 April 2016.
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Retrieved 3 April 2016.
  15. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved 3 April 2016.
  16. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved 3 April 2016.
  17. ^ Hinkle, Harlan H.; Grayback Mountaineers: The Confederate Face of Western Virginia, p. 194 ISBN 0595268404
  18. ^ Schwartzman, Gabe; ‘How Central Appalachia Went Right’; Daily Yonder, January 13, 2015
  19. ^ Cohn, Nate; ‘Demographic Shift: Southern Whites’ Loyalty to G.O.P. Nearing That of Blacks to Democrats’, New York Times, April 24, 2014
  20. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  21. ^ Keller, Julia. "It's a gosh-darned good thing: Stewart heads to West Virginia." Chicago Tribune. October 1, 2004. Tempo 1. Retrieved on January 5, 2010.
  22. ^ "Martha's Prison Thanksgiving." The Cincinnati Post. November 24, 2004. Retrieved on January 5, 2010. "Mullins said the prison dormitories are in Summers County."
  23. ^ FPC Alderson Contact Information. Federal Bureau of Prisons. Retrieved on January 5, 2010.
  24. ^ [Steelhammer, Rick (2008), "W.Va.'s 'Official' Sloth Fossil on Display near Cheat Lake", Charleston Gazette, Thursday, September 19, 2008.
  25. ^ National Park Service, Site GRSA-WV
  26. ^ Hajenga, Jeff (Winter 2005). "The Twilight Zone" (PDF). West Virginia Wildlife: 8–10.
  27. ^ "Great Saltpetre Cave History". www.rkci.org. Retrieved 28 March 2018.

Coordinates: 37°34′N 80°32′W / 37.56°N 80.54°W / 37.56; -80.54