Monastic Family of Bethlehem, of the Assumption of the Virgin and of Saint Bruno

The Monastic Family of Bethlehem, of the Assumption of the Virgin and of Saint Bruno (or simply Monks and Sisters of Bethlehem) is a Roman Catholic religious order that practices Carthusian spirituality and was founded through the inspiration of a small group of French pilgrims on November 1, 1950, at Saint Peter's Square, Rome, following the promulgation of the dogma of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary into Heaven.[1] The Monastic Sisters were founded in France, soon after, and the Monastic Brothers in 1976.

Monastic Family of Bethlehem, of the Assumption of the Virgin and of Saint Bruno (Bethléem)
Monks and Sisters of Bethlehem
Famille monastique de Bethléem, de l’Assomption de la Vierge et de Saint Bruno
Formation1950; 71 years ago (1950)
TypeInstitute of Consecrated Life of Pontifical Right (for Men and Women)
HeadquartersÉconome Générale Secrétaire des Monastères, 2055 Chemin di Piquetière, F-38380 Saint Laurent de Pont, France
Membership (2017)
41 (17 Priests)
Prioress General
Sr. Isabelle Flye-Sainte-Marie, Bethléem
The life and habit of the Monks and Sisters of Bethlehem is inspired by that of the Carthusian monks and St. Bruno.
Monastery of La Verne (France).
Cloister of the Monastery of Jerez de la Frontera (Spain).

VocationEdit

The vocation of the Monastic Family of Bethlehem, of the Assumption of the Virgin and of Saint Bruno communities consists in listening to the Gospel with the Blessed Virgin Mary in the heart of the Church, in love, in solitude, through liturgical life, study, work and poverty. In order to fulfil this vocation more perfectly, the Monasteries of Bethlehem receive Saint Bruno's fatherhood and his wisdom of life.

ControversiesEdit

Since 2015, the monastic family of Bethlehem is the object of a canonical visit led by Fr. Jean Quris, former Deputy Secretary General of the Conference of Bishops of France and by Sister Geneviève Barrière, Benedictine and former abbess of Jouarre, from 2007 to 2014. This visit follows the "dysfunctions" of certain communities and a lack of distinction between the internal and external fora.

A New Prioress GeneralEdit

Sister Emmanuel[2] was named general prioress of the monastic Family of Bethlehem, of the Assumption of the Virgin and of Saint Bruno by the Congregation of Religious, succeeding Sister Isabelle. The Congregation of Religious accepted the resignation of Sister Isabelle, former general prioress, “thanking her for the years of service when she succeeded the founder, Sister Marie, and for her courageous and timely decision to hand over her responsibility in this new stage for her monastic Family.

The Dicastery named a new general prioress, Sister Emmanuel, helped by 5 sisters who are her advisers, and two visitors as apostolic assistants: Father Jean Quris, a priest in the diocese of Angers and an episcopal delegate for consecrated life, and Mother Geneviève Barrière, former Abbess of Jouarre (see above : "controversies"). The role of the assistants chosen by Rome consists in remaining close to the general prioress and to the permanent advisers in order to cooperate in the implementation of the recommendations given by the Dicastery and of the renewal of the Constitutions, in view of a future general chapter to vote on the constitutions and to elect a general prioress. [3]

Presence in the WorldEdit

The first community of Monastic Sisters of Bethlehem began in 1951. The first community of Monastic Brothers of Bethlehem (or Monks) was founded in 1976, in the Chartreuse Mountains. The Monastic Family of Bethlehem, of the Assumption of the Virgin and of Saint Bruno has presently more than 670 members: more than 600 nuns and about 70 monks.[4] They live in 30 nunneries and 4 monasteries of brothers located in 15 different nations. The Monastic Family of Bethlehem also contains Lay Associates, Companions and Friends, all of whom contribute to the life of order.[5]

The monasteries of the Monastic Brothers of BethlehemEdit

The monasteries of the Monastic Sisters of BethlehemEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The beginnings of the Monastic Family of Bethlehem, of the Assumption of the Virgin and of Saint Bruno
  2. ^ Née in 1949 Rose Armelle Marie Claude Lorenchet de Montjamont
  3. ^ "THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE MONASTIC FAMILY OF BETHLEHEM". english.bethleem.org. Retrieved 2017-06-09.
  4. ^ Monastische Familie von Bethlehem 2012. Actualized on December 23, 2012
  5. ^ The Monasteries Throughout the World. Website of the Monastic Family of Bethlehem, of the Assumption of the Virgin and of Saint Bruno , August 25, 2014

External linksEdit