Mouha ou Hammou Zayani

  (Redirected from Moha Ou Hammou Zayani)

Mouha Ou Hammou Zayani, by his full name: Mohammed ou Hammou ben Akka ben Ahmed, also known as Moha Ou Hamou al-Harkati Zayani (1863 – 27 March 1921) was a Moroccan Berber military figure and tribal leader who played an important role in the history of Morocco. He was the leader (Qaid) of the Zayanes people of Khénifra region.

Mouha ou Hammou Zayani
Born1857 (1857) or 1863 (1863)
Died(1921-03-27)March 27, 1921
Resting placeBen Cherro near Tamalakt

BiographyEdit

Mouha was born in 1857[1] in the Middle atlas. His father Moha ou Aqqa was the tribal leader of Ayt Harkat. After the death of Ou Aqqa, his oldest son, Said, succeeded him and extended his dominance over his tribe and the Zayane confederation. Mouha succeeded his brother after his death, in 1887.[2] The Sultan Moulay Hassan I gave Mouha the title of Qaid in 1880[2] or 1886.[1] After the Treaty of Fes (1912), which put Morocco under the French Protectorate, Zayani, at the head of the Zayanes tribe, started a guerrilla war, known as the Zaian War. He managed to unite several Berber tribes of the Middle Atlas and fought smaller battles. The town of Khénifra was lost to the advancing French forces in June 1914, but in November of the same year, the Battle of El Herri took place and Zayani inflicted heavy losses (around 600 casualties) upon the French military. The battle was later dubbed the 'Moroccan Dien Bien Phu' in reference to the decisive battle in the French Indochina War. Despite the victory, Zayani could not secure Khénifra retired in to the region of Taoujgalt recruiting more men and preparing for further attacks against the French army. In May 1920, his sons Hassan and Amharoq who then led the Zayan tribe, surrendered to General Poeymirau.[3] On 27 March 1921, Mouha was killed in a battle at Azelag N'Tazemourte against his son Hassan, who led a zayyani detachment.[4]

He was buried at Ben Cherro near Tamalakt.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Gershovich, Moshe (2012). French Military Rule in Morocco: Colonialism and its Consequences. Routledge. p. 101. ISBN 978-1-136-32587-8.
  2. ^ a b Boum, Aomar (2012). Akyeampong, Emmanuel K.; Gates Jr., Henry Louis (eds.). Dictionary of African Biography. OUP USA. p. 231. ISBN 978-0-19-538207-5.
  3. ^ Bidwell, Robin. Morocco Under Colonial Rule: French Administration Of Tribal Areas 1912–1956. p. 40.
  4. ^ Gershovich, Moshe (2012). French Military Rule in Morocco: Colonialism and its Consequences. Routledge. p. 115. ISBN 978-1-136-32587-8.
  5. ^ Boum, Aomar (2012). Akyeampong, Emmanuel K.; Gates Jr., Henry Louis (eds.). Dictionary of African Biography. OUP USA. p. 232. ISBN 978-0-19-538207-5.

External linksEdit