Mogila, North Macedonia

Mogila (Macedonian: About this soundМогила ) is a village in North Macedonia. The village is located in Pelagonia Region, north-east of the city of Bitola. The name probably derives from the Slavic word "Mogila" which could mean "mound", "hill" or "grave".

Mogila

Могила
Village
Камбанарија Могила 09.JPG
Mogila is located in North Macedonia
Mogila
Mogila
Location within North Macedonia
Coordinates: 41°6′29″N 21°22′42″E / 41.10806°N 21.37833°E / 41.10806; 21.37833Coordinates: 41°6′29″N 21°22′42″E / 41.10806°N 21.37833°E / 41.10806; 21.37833
Country North Macedonia
RegionLogo of Pelagonia Region.svg Pelagonia
MunicipalityCoat of arms of Mogila Municipality.svg Mogila
Highest elevation
582 m (1,909 ft)
Population
 (2002)
 • Total1,526
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Car platesBT

DemographicsEdit

According to the 2002 census, all but one of Mogila's 1,526 residents were Macedonian.[1] Ethnic groups in the village include:[1]

Number %
TOTAL 1,526 100.00
Macedonians 1,525 99.93
Others 1 00.07

HistoryEdit

In the 19th century Ottoman Macedonia, Mogila was known as a village in the district of Bitola with a large population of "Komiti" or Macedonian freedom fighters. In 1900, Mogila had 850 residents.

In the late 19th century and early 20th century the village became involved in the struggle of the Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization against Ottoman rule. On May 8, 1903, the home of local revolutionary Nikola Meshkov, a member of Parashkev Tsvetkov's band, was raided by Ottoman forces, and in the ensuing battle three men and two women were killed.[2]

SportsEdit

Local football club FK Mogila last played in the Macedonian Third League.

Notable peopleEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Macedonian Census (2002), Book 5 - Total population according to the Ethnic Affiliation, Mother Tongue and Religion, The State Statistical Office, Skopje, 2002, p. 141.
  2. ^ Liberation struggle of Bulgarians in Macedonia and Odrinsko 1902-1904. Дипломатически документи, София 1978, с. 184-185 Diplomatic documents, Sofia 1978, pp 184-185

External linksEdit