Mohamed Karim Sbihi MBE (born 27 March 1988) is a British rower. He is a three-time Olympian and Olympic medal winner. He won a gold medal in the coxless four at 2016 Rio Olympics, and at the 2012 London Olympics he was in the British crew that won the bronze medal in the men's eight.[2] He returned to the eight for the 2020 Tokyo games, again winning bronze.

Mohamed Sbihi
MBE
Mohamed Sbihi at the Olympic Parade 2012.jpg
Personal information
NationalityBritish
Born (1988-03-27) 27 March 1988 (age 33)
Kingston upon Thames, England, United Kingdom
Alma materSt Mary's University, Twickenham
Height2.03 m (6 ft 8 in)[1]
Weight103 kg (227 lb)[1]
Sport
CountryGreat Britain
SportRowing
Event(s)Coxless four, Eight
ClubMolesey Boat Club

Early lifeEdit

Sbihi was born in Kingston upon Thames to a British mother and a Moroccan father.[3] He studied Sport Science with Health, Nutrition & Exercise at St. Mary's University College, Twickenham on a sports scholarship from 2006 to 2010. Before he joined the rowing team he played both association football and basketball.

At the age of 15, he was identified as a potentially successful oarsman by a talent-spotting programme and joined the GB Rowing World Class Start programme.[4][5] Sbihi finished first in the junior men J15 category at the 2003 Great Britain Indoor Rowing Championships.[6]

CareerEdit

At the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, United Kingdom he was part of the British crew that won the bronze medal in the eight.[7]

In 2013, he was part of the men’s eight that won gold at the World Rowing Championships. In 2014 he won gold medals in the coxless four at both the European Rowing Championships in Belgrade and the World Championships in Amsterdam.[8] In 2015, he won gold at the World Championships for the third consecutive year, this time in the eight again. [9]

In the 2016 Rio Olympics, Sbihi was part of the GB coxless four. The team won the gold medal, Britain's fifth consecutive gold in the event.[10][11]

He won a bronze medal at the 2017 World Rowing Championships in Sarasota, Florida, as part of the coxless four.[12] He then won a bronze medal at the 2018 World Rowing Championships in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, as part of the eight with James Rudkin, Alan Sinclair, Tom Ransley, Thomas George, Oliver Wynne-Griffith, Matthew Tarrant, Will Satch and Henry Fieldman[13] and won another bronze medal the following year at the 2019 World Rowing Championships in Ottensheim, Austria as part of the eight with George, Rudkin, Josh Bugajski, Jacob Dawson, Wynne-Griffith, Tarrant, Thomas Ford and Fieldman.[14]

In 2021, he won a European gold medal in the eight in Varese, Italy.[15][16]

Sbihi was selected as one of Team GB's two flag bearers for the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic Games Opening Ceremony, on 23 July 2021, which he described as a "huge honour".[17][18] He became Great Britain's first ever Muslim flag bearer.[19]

HonoursEdit

Sbihi was awarded the MBE in the Queen's 2017 New Year Honours list for services to rowing.[20]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Majendie, Matt (11 February 2016). "Moe Sbihi interview: Top British rower aiming to make up for pain of 2012 Olympics". The Independent. Retrieved 21 August 2016.
  2. ^ Barretto, Lawrence (2 August 2012). "Olympics rowing: GB bronze in men's eight won by Germany". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  3. ^ Caroline Cheese. "Human to Hero: Fast faith – Muslim rower's Olympic dilemma". CNN. Archived from the original on 7 October 2013. Retrieved 28 August 2014.
  4. ^ "Mohammed Sbihi learning fast about rowing demands". The Daily Telegraph. London. 28 April 2009. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  5. ^ Robert Kitson (3 May 2012). "London 2012 Olympics: Champions aren't made easily, says Mohamed Sbihi". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 28 August 2014. Retrieved 28 August 2014.
  6. ^ "Live-written Commentary". The Rowing Foundation.
  7. ^ Barretto, Lawrence (2 August 2012). "Olympics rowing: GB bronze in men's eight won by Germany". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 6 April 2014. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  8. ^ "New Zealand on a roll ahead of World Rowing Championships". Sportal. 22 August 2014. Archived from the original on 28 August 2014. Retrieved 28 August 2014.
  9. ^ Ling, Thomas (5 August 2016). "Rio Olympics 2016: Who is Mohamed Sbihi?". Radio Times.
  10. ^ "Rio Olympics 2016: Great Britain win gold in men's four". BBC Sport. 12 August 2016.
  11. ^ Sbihi, Moe (26 August 2016). "Mohamed Sbihi: The tears, parties and selfies of a gold medallist in Rio". i News.
  12. ^ "2017 World Championship" (PDF). 2017 World Rowing Championships. World Rowing. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 August 2020. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  13. ^ "2018 World Championship results" (PDF). World Rowing.
  14. ^ "2019 Eight results" (PDF). World Rowing.
  15. ^ "Men's Double Sculls Final A (Final)". World Rowing. Retrieved 11 June 2021.
  16. ^ "Men's Eight Final FA (Final)". World Rowing. Retrieved 11 June 2021.
  17. ^ Cary, Tom; White, Jim (22 July 2021). "One flag, two bearers: Moe Sbihi and Hannah Mills hope to beat Opening Ceremony logistical difficulties". The Telegraph. ISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  18. ^ Lowe, Alex. "Tokyo Olympics: Muslim rower Mohamed Sbihi flies flag for Team GB – and diversity". ISSN 0140-0460. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  19. ^ "Mohamed Sbihi proud to be Great Britain's first Muslim Olympic flag bearer". The Independent. 22 July 2021. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  20. ^ "Team GB stars dominate New Year's Honours List". Team GB. 30 December 2016.

External linksEdit

Olympic Games
Preceded by Flagbearer for   Great Britain
(with Hannah Mills)
Tokyo 2020
Succeeded by
Incumbent