Minsk Sports Palace

Minsk Sports Palace is an indoor sports arena, located in Minsk, Belarus.[1] The arena seats 4,842 spectators and opened in 1966. It hosts various indoor events, including HC Dynamo Minsk and the Kontinental Hockey League before Minsk-Arena was completed.

Minsk Sports Palace
Minsk palace of sports 02 (cropped).jpg
LocationMinsk, Belarus
Coordinates53°54′38″N 27°32′58″E / 53.910679°N 27.54958°E / 53.910679; 27.54958Coordinates: 53°54′38″N 27°32′58″E / 53.910679°N 27.54958°E / 53.910679; 27.54958
OwnerMinistry of Sport and Tourism
Capacity3,311 (sport)
4,500 (concerts)
Construction
Broke groundSeptember 1963
OpenedMay 1966
Renovated2001–04
Expanded1999
ArchitectFilimonov S.D.
Malyshev V.N.
Structural engineerKorzhevsky V.V.
Main contractorsBelgosproekt
Tenants
Tivali Minsk (1966–2001)
HC Dinamo Minsk (2004–2010)

HistoryEdit

 
Minsk Sports Palace in 1981

From the 1960s–1980s, the largest state events were held at the Sports Palace. Championships and international tournaments in wrestling, fencing, boxing, weightlifting, rhythmic and artistic gymnastics and other sports were also held there, including matches in the championship hockey club of the Union Dynamo and handball SKA. The Palace was also a venue of the largest concerts and the Communist Party meetings. In 1990, the Palace premises were leased to various exhibition and sporting events.

BuildingsEdit

Large arenaEdit

The main arena of the Palace of Sports is a universal sport and entertainment room with a hockey box sizes of 61×30 meters. The total capacity of the stands is 3,311 visitors (including the main grandstand - 3,074 seats, small podium - 237 seats) in the sport even version; when the arene is transformed to the concert version, 4,500 spectators can attend the event.

Small arenaEdit

 
The small ice arena in 2012

In 1999, the indoor training arena was built behind the Sports Palace. The small Sports Palace arena is used mainly as a platform for hockey and figure skating training sessions.

Sporting eventsEdit

ConcertsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ A Critical History of Contemporary Architecture: 1960-2010. Routledge. 5 December 2016. ISBN 9781351962599.

External linksEdit