Ministry of Social Affairs and Health

The Ministry of Social Affairs and Health (Finnish: Sosiaali- ja terveysministeriö, Swedish: Social- och hälsovårdsministeriet) is a Finnish government ministry tasked with the planning and implementation of policies regarding the social affairs and health of the inhabitants of Finland.[1] The ministry includes two ministers: the Minister of Social Affairs and Health and the Minister of Family Affairs and Social Services.

Ministry of Social Affairs and Health
Sosiaali- ja terveysministeriö
Social- och hälsovårdsministeriet
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Ministry overview
JurisdictionFinnish Government
HeadquartersMeritullinkatu 8, Helsinki
Annual budget€11.5 billion
Ministers responsible

The ministry has five departments: the Administration and Planning Department, the Department for Promotion of Welfare and Health, the Department for Social and Health Services, the Department for Occupational Safety and the Health and Insurance Department.[2]

The ministry's predecessor was founded prior to Finland's declaration of independence. In the beginning, it focused on countering misery, promoting sobriety, and caring for the poor, vagrants, children and alcoholics. Healthcare was introduced to its tasks in 1968.[3]

A major reform of the health and social service system (sosiaali- ja terveyspalveluiden uudistus, or sote-uudistus for short) has been in the works since 2011. The reform is set to be the largest change to Finland's social and healthcare systems in the country's history. The reform has been connected to the renewal of regional administration structure (maakuntauudistus).[4][5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The Ministry". Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  2. ^ "Management and organisation". Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  3. ^ "History - From Grand Duchy to welfare state". Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  4. ^ Hämäläinen, Unto (2015). "Sote on kaatanut monta ministeriä – kuinka käy Juha Rehulan?". Helsingin Sanoamt (in Finnish). Retrieved 22 January 2017.
  5. ^ "In-depth reform of the healthcare system in Finland". ESPN Flash Report. EU. 2016. Retrieved 22 January 2017.

External linksEdit