Open main menu

Wikipedia β

Million Dollar Extreme

Million Dollar Extreme (MDE) is an American sketch comedy troupe.[1] They are known for their online videos, anti-comedy, and public pranks.[2] The members are Sam Hyde, Charls Carroll, and Nick Rochefort.[3] In 2016, they produced Million Dollar Extreme Presents: World Peace, a live action sketch show for the cable network Adult Swim that satirized the contemporary cultural climate. They also released a 744-page book titled How To Bomb the US Gov't. [4]

Million Dollar Extreme
Mde.jpg
Medium Web, television, stand-up, literature
Nationality United States
Genres Satire, sketch comedy
Notable works and roles Million Dollar Extreme Presents: World Peace
Members
Website mde.tv

World PeaceEdit

On May 7, 2015, it was announced that MDE were slated to have their own live action 15-minute sketch show on the cable network Adult Swim.[5] It was to be set in a post-apocalyptic nightmare world that satirizes the current political climate.[3] Titled Million Dollar Extreme Presents: World Peace, the series premiered on August 5, 2016.[6] World Peace was subject to internal controversy at Adult Swim due to alleged ties the show's creators had to the alt-right. Three weeks later, it was announced that the show would not be renewed for a second season.[7]

Critical receptionEdit

Christian Williams of The A.V. Club describes them: "Some videos borrow Wonder Showzen's toolkit, wielding subliminal blips and eye-straining text in service of subversive ends. Some make use of the Tim And Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! aesthetic, and some are surprisingly slick, with excellent, eardrum-shredding music courtesy of talented mystery-men."[2] In the view of Philly Mag's Andrew Thompson: "The mission of Million Dollar Extreme has always seemed a spin on afflicting the comfortable, except its targets usually aren’t the comfortably powerful. To the extent that satire exists in MDEs comedy, it feels like more of rationalization than a reason for the shock itself."[1] Robert Mariani wrote at The Federalist that the group's comedy style is an example of post-irony: "Figuring out the intentions of the ironist is easy: whatever is being shown is being mocked. But the post-ironist folds over on his own sincerity with exaggeration, using the ironic not just to ridicule, but also to enjoy the absurdities of what he genuinely appreciates."[8]

ReferencesEdit