Milan Milanović (footballer, born 1963)

Milan Milanović (Serbian Cyrillic: Милан Милановић; born 10 January 1963) is a Serbian football manager and former player. He was the manager of Novi Pazar.

Milan Milanović
Personal information
Date of birth (1963-01-10) 10 January 1963 (age 58)
Place of birth Belgrade, SFR Yugoslavia
Position(s) Midfielder
Youth career
Partizan
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1983–1984 Čukarički
1984–1986 Zemun 60 (7)
1988–1989 FC Augsburg 3 (0)
1989–1990 Spartak Subotica 6 (0)
1990–1991 EFC Stahl 5 (0)
1991–1992 FC Gütersloh 9 (0)
1992–1993 Sachsen Leipzig 17 (2)
1993–1994 1. SV Gera 15 (2)
1997–1998 VB Vágur 23 (2)
Total 138 (13)
Teams managed
1997–1998 VB Vágur (player-manager)
2000 Zemun
2002–2003 Rad (assistant)
2003–2004 Rad
2005 TB Tvøroyri
2006 Jedinstvo Ub
2008 OFK Beograd (assistant)
2009 Laktaši
2011–2012 Sheriff Tiraspol (assistant)
2012 Sheriff Tiraspol
2012–2013 Hajduk Kula
2013 Novi Pazar
2013–2014 OFK Beograd
2014 Radnički Niš
2014–2016 Rad
2016–2018 Zemun
2018–2019 Radnik Surdulica
2019–2020 Irtysh Pavlodar
2020—2021 Rad
2021— Novi Pazar
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Playing careerEdit

After coming through the youth system of Partizan, Milanović played for Zemun in the Yugoslav Second League. He later spent multiple years in Germany, playing for five clubs in the lower leagues. In 1997, Milanović moved to the Faroe Islands and served as player-manager of VB Vágur for two seasons.[1][2]

Managerial careerEdit

After returning to his homeland, Milanović was manager of Zemun in the First League of FR Yugoslavia.[3][4] He later served as an assistant manager to Boško Đurovski at Rad,[5] before replacing him in May 2003.[6] After the club suffered relegation from the top flight, Milanović continued managing the team in the Second League until January 2004.[7]

In June 2009, Milanović was named as new manager of Laktaši in the Premier League of Bosnia and Herzegovina,[8] but left the club before the end of the year.[9] He later moved to Moldova and became an assistant to Vitali Rashkevich at Sheriff Tiraspol. In May 2012, Milanović replaced Rashkevich as manager.

In July 2014, Milanović took charge as manager of Serbian SuperLiga side Rad,[10] returning to the club after a decade elsewhere. He was discharged from his position in April 2016.[11] In August 2016, Milanović became manager of Serbian First League side Zemun for the second time,[12] guiding them to promotion to the top flight after 10 seasons. He decided to leave the club in August 2018.[13]

In June 2019, Milanović was appointed as manager of Kazakhstan Premier League side Irtysh Pavlodar.[14]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Milan Milanovic" (in Faroese). faroesoccer.com. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  2. ^ "Milan Milanovic" (in Faroese). faroesoccer.com. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  3. ^ "Zemun piše istoriju" (in Serbian). glas-javnosti.rs. 18 April 2000. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  4. ^ "Treneri s lastama" (in Serbian). glas-javnosti.rs. 2 December 2000. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  5. ^ "Rad turn to Djurovski". uefa.com. 7 November 2002. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  6. ^ "Zar je važno ko je kriv!" (in Serbian). glas-javnosti.rs. 13 May 2003. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  7. ^ "Zdravko Zemunović novi trener Rada" (in Serbian). b92.net. 29 January 2004. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  8. ^ "Predstavljen novi šef stručnog štaba FK Laktaši" (in Serbian). glassrpske.com. 17 June 2009. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  9. ^ "Široki Brijeg looking over their shoulders". uefa.com. 14 December 2009. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  10. ^ "Milanović vodi Rad" (in Serbian). novosti.rs. 1 July 2014. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  11. ^ "Smena u Radu pred meč sa Zvezdom" (in Serbian). sportskacentrala.com. 5 April 2016. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  12. ^ "OFK i Zemun već promenili trenere" (in Serbian). mondo.rs. 30 August 2016. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  13. ^ "Zemun bez trenera" (in Serbian). mondo.rs. 7 August 2018. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  14. ^ "Сербский специалист возглавил "Иртыш"" (in Russian). prosports.kz. 6 June 2019. Retrieved 4 February 2020.

External linksEdit