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Michel Lawrence (born 1948) is an Australian writer,[1][2] advertising creative director,[3] portrait photographer[4][5] and documentary director.[2] He also produced two photographic books, Framed: Photographs of Australian Artists[6] and All of Us,[7] documenting the multicultural makeup of Australia.

Michel Lawrence
Born (1948-10-16) 16 October 1948 (age 70)
NationalityAustralian
Known forPhotography

Contents

Early life and educationEdit

Lawrence matriculated from Camberwell Grammar School in Melbourne and enrolled at La Trobe University in its first year, becoming the foundation editor of the student newspaper Rabelais.[4][8]

CareerEdit

On leaving university, Lawrence began work as a journalist at the national daily newspaper, The Australian.[4][9][10] At News Ltd, Lawrence worked for the Sunday Australian and The Sunday Telegraph as a political columnist covering both state and federal politics.[11][12][13] After leaving The Australian in 1976, he founded and edited Australia's first skateboard magazine, Slicks.[14][15]

Lawrence was recruited to manage Australian electric folk group, The Bushwackers,[9][16] departing in 1976 with the band for an extended 18-month tour of Europe including England, Scotland and Wales, and recording their album Murrumbidgee[17] at Morgan's Studios, London.[18]

Returning to Australia in 1978, Lawrence founded the design studio Swell Productions which became the advertising agency Burrows Doble Lawrence, with Art Director Bill Burrows and agency Account Director Ed Doble. The agency was sold to D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles[19] and Lawrence was headhunted to the Australian retail agency Mattingly and Partners as its Executive Creative Director.[20] During this period he was also President of the Melbourne Art Directors’ Club.[21]

In 1990, Lawrence was appointed Executive Creative Director of the multi-national agency J. Walter Thompson,[22] eventually being appointed Managing Director of the Melbourne Office in 1998 and then Australian Chairman a year later.[23][24][25][26]

In 2001 while chairman of JWT, Lawrence was asked about the collapse of Australian airline Ansett, in the midst of a pitch for the airline's business. Lawrence told AdNews, "marketing and advertising were never the problems, and neither was ever going to solve deep-seated difficulties [at Ansett]."[27]

During a period of 10 years, Lawrence embarked on a personal project to photograph one hundred of Australia's most important postwar modernists including Sidney Nolan,[28][29] Lloyd Rees,[4] Arthur Boyd,[30] Donald Friend,[31] Sam Fullbrook,[32] Jeffrey Smart,[33] Elwyn Lynn,[34] David Larwill[35] and John Wolseley.[36][37] This became an exhibition at Australian Galleries Melbourne and Sydney in 1996. Two years later the exhibition was published as the book, Framed: Photographs of Australian Artists, published by Hardie Grant.[38] The book's cover portrait of Lloyd Rees had previously been a cover of the Sydney Morning Herald/Age magazine "Good Weekend", illustrating an article on the artist by Janet Hawley[39] winning her a Walkley Award.[40][41] Hawley also contributed the introduction to the book Framed.[42]

Lawrence's second book, All of Us includes photographs of people born in 200 other countries, but who were now living in Australia.[1][7] The project was inspired by the 2005 Cronulla riots.[43][44] All of Us was published by Scribe Books[1][45] and the portraits exhibited at Federation Square, Melbourne[46][47][48] and later in a tour of Indian cities.[49] The 'All of Us' project was launched at Federation Square by the Victorian Premier, John Brumby for Australia Day 2008[5] and was funded by Federal and State governments along with private benefactors.[50]

A subsequent project, 'Indian Aussies' was commissioned by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs[51] and has been touring India after its launch in New Delhi in 2013.[52][53]

Lawrence's photographs are held in numerous private and public collections, including The National Portrait Gallery in Canberra,[4] The National Library in Canberra,[54] The Queensland Art Gallery (QAGOMA),[55] The Museum of Modern Art at Heide,[53] Melbourne University and a number of regional galleries across Australia.[56][57][58] Lawrence's collection of photographs of Australian musicians, actors and performers is in the permanent collection of the Melbourne Performing Arts Museum.[59]

In 2012, Lawrence's production company Miro Films[60] began producing the television arts program InsideArt,[61][62] which has run four seasons across Australian public broadcasters in Melbourne, Sydney and Perth. In 2014, InsideArt was voted Most Outstanding Australian Arts Program across the public broadcasting network at the Antenna Awards.

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Readings Monthly" (PDF). Readings - Books, Music, Film - Melbourne's Own Since 1969. February 2008. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Who gets to write the script for our multicultural future?". The Conversation. 19 March 2014. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  3. ^ Burbury, Rochelle (22 August 2000). "JWT gets creative with shake-up". The Australian Financial Review. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via Shack West.
  4. ^ a b c d e "National Portrait Gallery of Australia". People, Michel Lawrence, b1948. National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  5. ^ a b "Exhibition reveals migrant stories". The Age.
  6. ^ Lynn, Elwyn (14 December 1991). "More things of heaven and earth..." The Weekend Australian. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via Shack West.
  7. ^ a b http://www.photoreview.com.au/stories/profiles/michel-lawrence-all-for-one
  8. ^ Fritsch, Ashley (10 September 2009). "Avocados, Testicles and Facebook; What do they have in Common?". upstart. Upstart Magazine. Archived from the original on 1 February 2016. Retrieved 27 January 2016.
  9. ^ a b "Meet our team!". NBS Productions. Archived from the original on 2 March 2016. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  10. ^ Lawrence, Michel (21 May 1973). "Beer for the winner, Scotch for the loser" (PDF). The Australian. Retrieved 10 February 2016 – via Shack West.
  11. ^ Lawrence, Michel (13 May 1973). "On The Political Merry-Go-Round". The Sunday Telegraph. Retrieved 10 February 2016 – via Shack West.
  12. ^ Lawrence, Michel (6 May 1973). "Young voters may hold key in bayside suburb" (PDF). The Sunday Telegraph. Retrieved 10 February 2016 – via Shack West.
  13. ^ Lawrence, Michel (20 May 1973). "Massive Win For Liberals" (PDF). The Sunday Telegraph. Retrieved 10 February 2016 – via Shack West.
  14. ^ Lawrence, Michel (1976). "Slicks: The Australian Skateboard Magazine". Slicks: The Australian Skateboard Magazine. Slicks Publishing (Vol 1 No 1). Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  15. ^ Lawrence, Michel (1976). "Slicks: The Australian Skateboard Magazine". Slicks: The Australian Skateboard Magazine. Slicks Publishing (Vol 1 No 1). Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  16. ^ Oshlack, Ian (1 May 1987). "Third down and goal". Work in Progress. Retrieved 10 February 2016 – via Shack West.
  17. ^ Sleger, Dave (1994). "ALBUM REVIEW". Virgin Radio. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  18. ^ "The Bushwackers Band "Murrumbidgee" LP 1977". Australian Folk Music and Australian Folk Singers and Musicians. 30 March 2009. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  19. ^ "Masius incorporates Burrows Doble trio". B&T Magazine. 15 August 1986. Retrieved 10 February 2016 – via Shack West.
  20. ^ Phillips, Mark (18 November 1988). "David Mattingly, salesman extraordinaire" (PDF). Ad News. Retrieved 10 February 2016 – via Shack West.
  21. ^ Miller, Mark (30 June 1989). "Michel Lawrence: Lawrence of Suburbia" (PDF). B&T Magazine. Retrieved 10 February 2016 – via Shack West.
  22. ^ "Chapter Six: Lazarus rises". Melbourne Press Club. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  23. ^ Schou-Clarke, Jane (16 March 2001). "Chopper works in the US". AdNews. Retrieved 27 January 2016.
  24. ^ "AGENCY PEOPLE MOVES". AdNews. 20 December 2002. Retrieved 27 January 2016.
  25. ^ "Is Ansett's $20m campaign working?". AdNews. 5 November 2001. Retrieved 27 January 2016.
  26. ^ Burbury, Rochelle (22 August 2000). "JWT gets creative with shake-up". The Australian Financial Review. Retrieved 10 February 2016 – via Shack West.
  27. ^ Schou-Clarke, Jane (14 September 2001). "The pitch we didn't have to have". AdNews. Retrieved 27 January 2016.
  28. ^ "Art". IronOutlaw.com. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  29. ^ "Education Kit - Unmasked: Sidney Nolan and Ned Kelly 1950 – 1990" (PDF). Heide Museum of Modern Art. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  30. ^ "Framing the Arts". Arts Talk. 6 February 2000. Retrieved 24 January 2016 – via ABC Radio National.
  31. ^ Pearce, Barry (1990). Donald Friend, 1915-1989: Retrospective. Art Gallery of New South Wales. ISBN 0730569292.
  32. ^ "SAM FULLBROOK: DELICATE BEAUTY". QAGOMA. 3 June 2014. Retrieved 2 February 2016 – via Queensland Art Gallery.
  33. ^ Pearce, Barry (2015). Master of Stillness: Jeffrey Smart. Australia: Wakefield Press. pp. 4, 5. ISBN 9781743053393.
  34. ^ Pinson, Peter (2002). Elwyn Lynn : metaphor + texture. St Leonards, N.S.W.: Craftsman House. p. 155. ISBN 1877004170.
  35. ^ McGregor, Ken (1997). Larwill, David, 1956-. North Ryde, N.S.W.: Craftsman House. ISBN 9057037815.
  36. ^ Hawley, Janet (18 May 1991). "Brush With Nature". Good Weekend magazine. Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  37. ^ Hawley, Janet (1993). Encounters with Australian Artistry. University of Queensland Press. p. 136. ISBN 0702225614.
  38. ^ [1] 'National Library of Australia catalogue' ISBN 1-86-498017-6
  39. ^ Anderson, Patricia (8 December 2012). "Artists in Conversation reveal secrets of success in interviews with Janet Hawley". Retrieved 1 February 2016 – via The Australian.
  40. ^ "Janet Hawley (AUTHOR)". Penguin Books Australia. Penguin Books. 2016. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  41. ^ "Hawley, Janet". Trove. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  42. ^ "Victorian History Library". Prahran Mechanics' Institute. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  43. ^ Margaret, Brown. "Michel Lawrence: All for one". Photo Review. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  44. ^ Beanland, Glenn. "The Middle East". Victorian Multicultural Commission. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  45. ^ "All of Us" (PDF). The Police Association Victoria. The Police Association Victoria. March 2008. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  46. ^ Tay, Huey Fern (25 January 2008). "Capturing the faces that make up the nation". The 7.30 Report. ABC. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  47. ^ "First Fleet Fellowship Victoria: About". Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  48. ^ Van Der Riet, Tessa (21 February 2008). "Education Times" (PDF). Retrieved 24 January 2016 – via Department of Education and Early Childhood Development.
  49. ^ "'Indian Aussies' photo expo inaugurated at mall". The Hindu. 12 June 2013. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  50. ^ "Australian Foreign Minister to inaugurate photography exhibition in Delhi". Australian High Commission, New Delhi.
  51. ^ Burrows, Bill. "Indian Aussies Website". Bill Burrows Design. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  52. ^ "Indian Aussies exhibition launched". Australian High Commission, New Delhi.
  53. ^ a b Divya, Mangwani (16 February 2011). "Glimpses of Aussie Indians". dna syndication. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  54. ^ "1998, English, Book, Illustrated edition: Framed : photographs of Australian artists / by Michel Lawrence". Trove. National Library of Australia. 1998. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  55. ^ http://blog.qagoma.qld.gov.au/sam-fullbrook-delicate-beauty/
  56. ^ "Explore our Collections". Castlemaine Art Gallery. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  57. ^ Peter, Burke. "Peter Burke - Exhibitions". Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  58. ^ "Artwork Detail". Lismore Regional Gallery. June 2006. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  59. ^ http://collections.artscentremelbourne.com.au/paminter/imu.php?request=browse&irn=2988
  60. ^ http://mirofilms.tv
  61. ^ http://insideart.tv
  62. ^ "Creative Futures: Visual Arts, AusVELS & the Australian Curriculum" (PDF). Art Education Victoria. Retrieved 24 January 2016.