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miR-33 is a family of microRNA precursors, which are processed by the Dicer enzyme to give mature microRNAs.[1] miR-33 is found in several animal species, including humans. In some species there is a single member of this family which gives the mature product mir-33. In humans there are two members of this family called mir-33a and mir-33b, which are located in intronic regions within two protein-coding genes for Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP-2 and SREBP-1) respectively.[2]

miR-33a
Mir-33 SS.png
Conserved secondary structure of miR-33a microRNA precursor
Identifiers
SymbolmiR-33a
Alt. Symbolsmir33a
RfamRF00667
miRBaseMI0000091
miRBase familyMIPF0000070
Entrez407039
HUGO31634
Other data
RNA typemiRNA
Domain(s)Metazoa
GO0035195
SO0001244
LocusChr. 22 q13.2
PDB structuresPDBe
miR-33b
Identifiers
SymbolmiR-33b
Alt. Symbolsmir33b
RfamRF00667
miRBaseMI0003646
miRBase familyMIPF0000070
Entrez693120
HUGO32791
Other data
RNA typemiRNA
Domain(s)Metazoa
GO0035195
SO0001244
LocusChr. 17 13.2
PDB structuresPDBe

Contents

FunctionEdit

miR-33 plays a role in lipid metabolism; it downregulates a number of ABC transporters, including ABCA1 and ABCG1, which in turn regulate cholesterol and HDL generation.[3][4] Further related roles of miR-33 have been proposed in fatty acid degradation and in macrophage response to low-density lipoprotein.[2] It has been suggested that miR-33a and miR-33b regulates genes Involved in fatty acid metabolism and insulin signalling.[5]

Potential binding sites for mir-33 have been identified in the cDNA of tumour suppressor p53.[6] Further, study has shown that miR-33 is able to repress p53 expression and p53-induced apoptosis. This function is thought to be related to hematopoietic stem cell renewal.[7]

ApplicationsEdit

miR-33, along with miR-122, could be used to diagnose or treat conditions related to metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease.[2][8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ambros, V (2001). "microRNAs: tiny regulators with great potential". Cell. 107 (7): 823–826. doi:10.1016/S0092-8674(01)00616-X. PMID 11779458.
  2. ^ a b c Najafi-Shoushtari, SH (Jun 2011). "MicroRNAs in cardiometabolic disease". Current Atherosclerosis Reports. 13 (3): 202–7. doi:10.1007/s11883-011-0179-y. PMID 21461683.
  3. ^ Fernández-Hernando, C; Suárez, Y; Rayner, KJ; Moore, KJ (Apr 2011). "MicroRNAs in lipid metabolism". Current Opinion in Lipidology. 22 (2): 86–92. doi:10.1097/MOL.0b013e3283428d9d. PMC 3096067. PMID 21178770.
  4. ^ Moore, KJ; Rayner, KJ; Suárez, Y; Fernández-Hernando, C (Dec 2010). "microRNAs and cholesterol metabolism". Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism. 21 (12): 699–706. doi:10.1016/j.tem.2010.08.008. PMC 2991595. PMID 20880716.
  5. ^ Dávalos A, Goedeke L, Smibert P, et al. (May 2011). "miR-33a/b contribute to the regulation of fatty acid metabolism and insulin signaling". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108 (22): 9232–7. Bibcode:2011PNAS..108.9232D. doi:10.1073/pnas.1102281108. PMC 3107310. PMID 21576456.
  6. ^ Herrera-Merchan, A; Cerrato, C; Luengo, G; Dominguez, O; Piris, MA; Serrano, M; Gonzalez, S (Aug 15, 2010). "miR-33-mediated downregulation of p53 controls hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal". Cell Cycle (Georgetown, Tex.). 9 (16): 3277–85. doi:10.4161/cc.9.16.12598. PMID 20703086.
  7. ^ Fuster, JJ; Andrés, V (Sep 1, 2010). "A role for miR-33 in p53 regulation: New perspectives for hematopoietic stem cell research". Cell Cycle (Georgetown, Tex.). 9 (17): 3397–8. doi:10.4161/cc.9.17.13070. PMID 20861665.
  8. ^ Najafi-Shoushtari, SH; Kristo, F; Li, Y; Shioda, T; Cohen, DE; Gerszten, RE; Näär, AM (Jun 18, 2010). "MicroRNA-33 and the SREBP host genes cooperate to control cholesterol homeostasis". Science. 328 (5985): 1566–9. Bibcode:2010Sci...328.1566N. doi:10.1126/science.1189123. PMC 3840500. PMID 20466882.

External linksEdit