Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science

The Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science (MCCMS), formerly known as Mayo Clinic College of Medicine (MCCM),[1] is a private graduate-only[5] research university based in Rochester, Minnesota that trains physicians, scientists, and allied health professionals. The college is part of the Mayo Clinic academic medical center and is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC).[2] MCCMS consists of five schools that offer M.D., Ph.D., and other degrees, as well as residencies, fellowships, and continuing medical education.[6]

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science
Mayo Clinic College logo.png
Former names
Mayo Clinic College of Medicine (2003 – 2017)[1]
Mayo Foundation (until 2003)[2]
TypePrivate nonprofit university
Established1915[3]
Parent institution
Mayo Clinic
DeanFredric B. Meyer, M.D. (Juanita Kious Waugh Executive Dean for Education)[4]
Location, ,
44°01′17″N 92°28′01″W / 44.0213°N 92.4670°W / 44.0213; -92.4670Coordinates: 44°01′17″N 92°28′01″W / 44.0213°N 92.4670°W / 44.0213; -92.4670
CampusUrban
Websitecollege.mayo.edu

OrganizationEdit

School Abbreviation Established
School of Graduate Medical Education MCSGME 1915
School of Medicine MCASOM 1972
School of Health Sciences MCSHS 1973
School of Continuous Professional Development MCSCPD 1977
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences MCGSBS 1989

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science is divided into five schools.[7][8]

Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical EducationEdit

The Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education (MCSGME), established in 1915, offers 270+ residences and fellowships in all medical and surgical specialties.[9][10]

Mayo Clinic Alix School of MedicineEdit

The Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine (MCASOM), established in 1972, offers M.D., M.D.-Ph.D. (jointly with MCGSBS), and M.D.-O.M.S. (jointly with MCSGME) degrees.[11][12]

Mayo Clinic School of Health SciencesEdit

The Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences (MCSHS), established in 1973, offers 50+ health sciences career fields.[13]

Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional DevelopmentEdit

The Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development (MCSCPD), established in 1977, offers 500+ courses in continuing education for medical professionals.[14]

Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical SciencesEdit

The Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (MCGSBS), established in 1989, offers Master's, Ph.D., and M.D.-Ph.D. (jointly with MCASOM) degrees in biomedical sciences.[15]

Interschool programsEdit

The collegiate structure of the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science allows students to combine advanced training within the Mayo Clinic.[7]

Medical Scientist Training Program (M.D.-Ph.D.)Edit

The Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine grants the M.D.-Ph.D. dual degree in conjunction with the Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, fully funded through an NIH/NIGMS Medical Scientist Training Program T32 grant.[16][17] The Mayo Clinic MSTP operates on a 2-4-2 model, where students earn their Ph.D. between medical school Years 2 and 3. MSTP students are able to take or test out of several graduate school classes during medical school Years 1 and 2. They also have the flexibility to complete medical school Year 3 clinical clerkships during their graduate school years if it works with their research schedule. For students who choose to focus exclusively on research during the graduate phase, a robust re-entry curriculum is provided to students as they transition back to medical school Year 3.[18] The Mayo Clinic MSTP fully supports students through a guaranteed internal fellowship for up to four research years, eliminating the need for students to identify a faculty member to provide financial support.[19]

Center for Clinical and Translational Science M.D.-M.S. ProgramEdit

The Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCaTS) offers the M.D.-M.S. dual degree through MCASOM and MCGSBS.[20] The CCaTS program is open to medical students at MCASOM and the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. Competitive awards are available to cover program fees while also providing a stipend and support for research expenses.

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency (M.D.-O.M.S.)Edit

The Mayo Clinic Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery residency (M.D.-O.M.S.) is a 6-year joint offering of MCASOM and Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education in which dentists earn their M.D. degrees during surgical training.[21]

HistoryEdit

The Mayo Clinic has a long history of medical education, and was a pioneer in postgraduate education for physicians.[22]

The first medical educational programs at the Mayo Clinic were developed in 1915 with the assistance of the University of Minnesota.[23][24] The two institutions held close relationships in the early 20th century. William James Mayo was a Regent of the University of Minnesota[25] and his brother Charles Horace Mayo was a professor of surgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School. In its early years, the Mayo Clinic was operated as a for-profit hospital[26][27] and could not affiliate with the University.[23]

This led to the creation of the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER) in 1915.[28] MFMER was established as a department of the University of Minnesota with a $1.5 million donation to offer graduate programs at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester.[29] During the same time period, the Mayo brothers created the Mayo Properties Association which converted the Mayo Clinic into a non-profit association practice. Mayo Properties Association later became the Mayo Foundation.[24] These steps led to the University and Mayo Clinic to enter into an affiliation and teaching agreement.[30] The curriculum during this period focused on the development of medical specialists during a time when the medical field was becoming further professionalized.

LocationEdit

The Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science is based in Rochester, Minnesota, with additional campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida.[31]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Mayo Clinic updates names of its college and schools". Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. Retrieved 15 February 2018.
  2. ^ a b "HLC Statement of Accreditation Status for MCCMS".
  3. ^ "MCCMS History". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  4. ^ "Fredric B. Meyer, M.D." Mayo Clinic. Retrieved 8 February 2018.
  5. ^ "Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science". Carnegie Classifications. Retrieved 4 May 2019.
  6. ^ "Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science". NCES College Navigator. Retrieved 4 May 2019.
  7. ^ a b Porter, Barbara L.; Grande, Joseph P. (2010). "Mayo Medical School". Academic Medicine. 85 (9): S300-4. doi:10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181e9155c. ISSN 1040-2446. PMID 20736572.
  8. ^ Warner, MA (March 2014). "You trained at Mayo Clinic? Wow!". Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 89 (3): 284–90. doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.09.017. PMID 24582187.
  9. ^ "Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education".
  10. ^ Boes, CJ; Long, TR; Rose, SH; Fye, WB (February 2015). "The founding of the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education". Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 90 (2): 252–63. doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2014.12.008. PMID 25659241.
  11. ^ "Mayo Clinic School of Medicine".
  12. ^ "Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency, M.D.-O.M.S. (Minnesota)".
  13. ^ "Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences".
  14. ^ "Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development".
  15. ^ "Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences".
  16. ^ "Mayo Clinic MSTP".
  17. ^ "Medical Scientist Training Program at Mayo Clinic". National Institutes of Health. Retrieved 24 June 2018.
  18. ^ Dyrbye, LN; Rohren, C; Tiegs, R (May 2004). "An MD-PhD re-entry curriculum". Medical Education. 38 (5): 548–9. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2929.2004.01854.x. PMID 15107093.
  19. ^ "MCGSBS Tuition, Stipend and Benefits". Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  20. ^ "Overview - M.D.-M.S. Program - Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCaTS)". Mayo Clinic Research.
  21. ^ "Mayo Clinic Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency, M.D.-O.M.S."
  22. ^ "MCSGME History". Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. Retrieved 8 February 2018.
  23. ^ a b Kennedy, William. "History of Medicine in the St. Paul-Minneapolis Metropolitan area". Kennedy Laboratory at the University of Minnesota. University of Minnesota Neurology Department. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  24. ^ a b Rogers, Karen (January 1, 2011). Medicine and Healers Through History. Britannica Educational Publishing. p. 200. ISBN 9781615304059. In 1919 the Mayo Brothers transferred property and capital to the Mayo Properties Association, later called the Mayo Foundation, a charitable and education corporation having a perpetual charter. ...In 1915 the Mayo Brothers gave $1.5 million to the University of Minnesota to establish the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research at Rochester in connection with the clinic. The foundation, which is part of the University of Minnesota Graduate School, offers graduate training in medicine and related subjects.
  25. ^ "University of Minnesota Board of Regents History". University of Minnesota Board of Regents. University of Minnesota. 2015-12-31. Retrieved 9 July 2018. Fun Facts: William J. Mayo, one of the Mayo brothers and founders of the Mayo Clinic, served on the Board from 1907 to 1939.
  26. ^ Berry, Leonard; Seltman, Kent (January 1, 2014). "Chapter 31: The Mayo Clinic Way: A Story of Cultural Strength and Sustainability". In Schneider, Benjamin; Barbera, Karen (eds.). The Oxford Handbook of Organizational Climate and Culture. Oxford University Press. pp. 611–612. ISBN 9780199860715. the brothers created Mayo Properties Association in 1919, transforming Mayo clinic from a for-profit, privately held company to a not-for-profit organization.
  27. ^ Danilov, Victor (September 26, 2013). "Medical Innovators". Famous Americans: A Directory of Museums, Historic Sites, and Memorials (1 ed.). Scarecrow Press. p. 135. ISBN 9780810891852. Dr. Charles Horace Mayo was born after a move to Rochester - where the three Mayo doctors and four other physicians later founded the Mayo Clinic, which became a not-for-profit medical facility in 1919
  28. ^ "Review: Sketch of the History of the Mayo Clinic and the Mayo Foundation". The Indian Medical Gazette. 2 (63): 105–106. February 1, 1928. PMC 5235446.
  29. ^ Wilson, Louis B.; Sanford, A. H. (September 1920). "The Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research". Sigma Xi Quarterly. 8 (3): 52–58. JSTOR 27824137.
  30. ^ Boes, Christopher; Long, Timothy; Rose, Steven; Fye, W. Bruce (February 1, 2015). "The Founding of the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education". Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 90 (2): 252–63. doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2014.12.008. PMID 25659241. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  31. ^ "Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science".