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Mausam (English: Season) is a 1975 Indian film starring Sanjeev Kumar and Sharmila Tagore, and directed by Gulzar. It is loosely based on the novel, The Judas Tree, by A.J. Cronin. Sharmila Tagore for her acting received The Silver Lotus Award at the 23rd National Film Festival and the movie was honoured by presenting an award for 2nd Best Feature Film.[2] The movie received two of eight nominations at the 24th Filmfare Awards. The film also won many other accolades as well.[1]

Mausam
Mausam1975.jpg
DVD cover
Directed byGulzar[1]
Produced byP. Mallikharjuna Rao
Written byBhushan Banmali
Kamleshwar
Gulzar
Based onThe Judas Tree
by A.J. Cronin kamleshwar aagami atit upnyas
StarringSharmila Tagore
Sanjeev Kumar
Dina Pathak
Om Shivpuri
Satyen Kappu
C.S.Dubey
Lily Chakravarty
Music bySongs:
Madan Mohan
Background Score:
Salil Chowdhury
CinematographyK. Vaikunth
Edited byWaman B. Bhosle
Gurudutt Shirali
Release date
  • 29 December 1975 (1975-12-29)
[1]
Running time
156 minutes
CountryIndia
LanguageHindi


The film was remade in Tamil as Vasandhathil or Naal, with Sivaji Ganesan.[3]

Contents

PlotEdit

Mausam is the dramatic love story of Dr. Amarnath Gill, who falls for Chanda, the daughter of a local healer, Harihar Thapa, when visiting Darjeeling to prepare for his medical exams. Then he has to leave back to Calcutta for his final exams. He promises Chanda to return, though he never keeps his promise. Twenty-five years later, he returns as a wealthy man and searches for Chanda and her father. He learns that Harihar has died and that Chanda was married to a crippled old man. She gave birth to a daughter, became insane and died. Finding Chanda's daughter, Kajli, he sees that she closely resembles her mother and later discovers that after having been molested by her mother's brother-in-law, she ended up at a brothel. Amarnath had no choice but to buy her from the brothel and he takes Kajli home and tries to change her into a well-refined woman to make up for what he did to Chanda. Unaware that Amarnath is indirectly responsible for her mother's death, Kajli begins to fall in love with him.

CastEdit

ProductionEdit

The film was written simultaneously along with Aandhi (1975), together by Kamleshwar, Bhushan Banmali and Gulzar, and even shot together, with Sanjeev Kumar playing the lead of an old man in the films. Though Aandhi was released first, it ran into political controversy and portions of it had to be reshot, meanwhile Mausam was completed and released.[4] While the song, "Meri Ishq Ke Lakhon Jhatke" was being shot with Sharmila Tagore, choreographer Saroj Khan was also in the studios for another film, that is when Gulzar requested her to teach a few moves to Tagore.[4]

MusicEdit

The background score for the movie was composed by Salil Chowdhury and the songs were composed by Madan Mohan. The movie credits dedicate this movie to Late Madan Mohan after his demise on 14 July 1975. The songs of the movie were penned by Gulzar. Mausam is one of those two movies directed by Gulzar, the songs of which were composed by Madan Mohan. The other one is Koshish. Gulzar stated that the song Dil Dhoondta Hai, "...one his most memorable songs..."(Scroll.in, Aug 18, 2016) that he wrote in the film.[5]

The song Dil Dhoondta Hai, by Bhupinder Singh and Lata Mangeshkar, featured at 12th position on the Annual list of the year-end chart toppers of Binaca Geetmala for 1976.

Sr. No. Song Singers Picturised On
1 Dil Dhoondta Hai (Sad) Bhupinder Singh title track
2 Chhadi Re Chhadi Mohammad Rafi, Lata Mangeshkar Sanjeev Kumar, Sharmila Tagore
3 Dil Dhoondta Hai Bhupinder Singh & Lata Mangeshkar Sanjeev Kumar, Sharmila Tagore
4 Mere Ishq Mein Asha Bhosle Sanjeev Kumar, Sharmila Tagore
5 Ruke Ruke Se Kadam Lata Mangeshkar Sharmila Tagore

AwardsEdit

WonEdit

NominatedEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "'Bad' girls in filmi market". India Times. 24 September 2003. Retrieved 9 February 2019.
  2. ^ a b 23rd National Film Awards
  3. ^ http://behindwoods.com/tamil-movies-cinema-column/sivaji-ganesan.html
  4. ^ a b "Mausam (1975)". The Hindu. 30 May 2013. Retrieved 13 June 2013.
  5. ^ "The debt owed by Gulzar's lyrics to Mirza Ghalib". Scroll.in. 18 August 2016. Retrieved 9 February 2019.

External linksEdit