Buck Rogers: Matrix Cubed

  (Redirected from Matrix Cubed)

Buck Rogers: Matrix Cubed is a role-playing video game developed and published by Strategic Simulations in 1992.

Buck Rogers: Matrix Cubed
Buck Rogers - Matrix Cubed Coverart.png
Developer(s)Strategic Simulations
Publisher(s)Strategic Simulations
Designer(s)Rhonda Van
Programmer(s)Russell Brown
Artist(s)Tom Wahl
Composer(s)George Alistair Sanger
SeriesBuck Rogers
Gold Box
Platform(s)MS-DOS
Release1992
Genre(s)Role-playing
Mode(s)Single-player

Versions of the game were sold for the IBM PC Compatible (all versions used the Gold Box engine.)

The game took place in the Buck Rogers XXVC campaign setting. Matrix Cubed is a sequel to Countdown to Doomsday, which came out in 1990.

ReceptionEdit

SSI sold 38,086 copies of Matrix Cubed.[1] Scorpia of Computer Gaming World in 1992 criticized SSI for, as it did with Eye of the Beholder, giving the game an abrupt, anticlimactic ending. She concluded that "overall, Matrix Cubed is a disappointment. Aside from the horrible ending, the pieces just don't fit together as well as they should", and inferior to Countdown to Doomsday.[2] In 1993 the magazine stated that the game was "a disappointing sequel", advising those who were not a "real hard-core Rogers fan" to avoid it.[3] The game was reviewed in 1992 in Dragon #182 by Hartley, Patricia, and Kirk Lesser in "The Role of Computers" column. The reviewers gave the game 4 out of 5 stars.[4]

See alsoEdit

Game differencesEdit

There is only one known version for MS-DOS:

OS Version Language
MS-DOS V1.0 Turbo Pascal 6.0 (exepacked)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Maher, Jimmy (2017-03-31). "Opening the Gold Box, Part 5: All That Glitters is Not Gold". The Digital Antiquarian.
  2. ^ Scorpia (May 1992). "Scorpion's View". Computer Gaming World. p. 80. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  3. ^ Scorpia (October 1993). "Scorpia's Magic Scroll Of Games". Computer Gaming World. pp. 34–50. Retrieved 25 March 2016.
  4. ^ Lesser, Hartley; Lesser, Patricia & Lesser, Kirk (June 1992). "The Role of Computers". Dragon (182): 55–60.

External linksEdit