Masanobu Ando

Masanobu Ando (安藤 政信, Andō Masanobu, born May 19, 1975) is a Japanese actor.

Masanobu Ando
安藤 政信
Masanobu Andô 2011.jpg
Ando in 2011
Born (1975-05-19) May 19, 1975 (age 45)
NationalityJapanese
OccupationActor, Director
Years active1994–present
Known forKids Return, Battle Royale
Height175 cm (5 ft 9 in)
Children2

Ando has appeared in films such as Takeshi Kitano's Kids Return (1996), Kinji Fukasaku's Battle Royale (2000), Takashi Miike's Sukiyaki Western Django (2007), and Chen Kaige's Forever Enthralled (2008).[1] He also appears in Tsai Ming-liang's award-winning film No No Sleep (2015), in a series of statically filmed urban scenes without dialogue.

CareerEdit

When Masanobu Ando completed school his direction towards a specific career path was not immediately concrete. In 1994 he was approached by a talent scout on the street and was offered an acting role, which began a new journey for Ando and his acting career.[2] Ando's career took off after starring in his first film, Takeshi Kitano's Kids Return (1996), which became one of Kitano's most successful films in Japan. He played the role of Shinji, a high school student who gave up school to pursue boxing with his best friend.[3] Ando became a popular young actor in Japan during the late 1990s, but his career slowed down in the 2000s, when he took fewer roles and was only in one or two films per year.[4] He is most famous in the West for his psychopath-killer role of Kazuo Kiriyama in Kinji Fukusaku's Battle Royale (2000), a blockbuster dystopia film, which managed to be one of the most famous blood and gore films of the decade.

In 1998 he visited Russia to film for a Japanese show, Seinen wa Kouya wo Mezasu, where he travelled from Vladivostok to Khabarovsk along the Trans-Siberian Railway.[2] Ando co-starred in Takashi Miike's Big Bang Love, Juvenile A with Ryuhei Matsuda.[5] He played a supporting role in Shinya Tsukamoto's Nightmare Detective.[6] Ando also appeared in Katsuhito Ishii's Smuggler.[7] He has taken part in the Toronto Film Festival.

Around 2016, the twentieth anniversary of his entry into the film industry, Ando made a comeback and starred in several films, including Sailor Suit and Machine Gun: Graduation, Gonin Saga, and Sadako vs. Kayako.[4]

Personal lifeEdit

Ando is married and has two children.[4]

FilmographyEdit

FilmEdit

TelevisionEdit

  • My Friend's Lover (1997) - Tomoya Kashiwagi
  • When the Saints Go Marching In (1998) - Ren Takahara
  • Blue Days (1998) - Juri Sawaki
  • Seinen wa Kouya o Mezasu (1999, TV Movie) - Jun
  • Gakko no Kaidan: Haru no Noroi Special (2000, TV Movie) - Satô (segment "Kyôfu shinrigaku nyûmon")
  • Higashino Keigo Mysteries (2012) - Bito Shigehisa / Akiyama Yuichi
  • Code Blue (2017)
  • Your Turn to Kill (2019)
  • Kirin ga Kuru (2020–21) - Shibata Katsuie
  • Ship of Theseus (2020)
  • The Sun Stands Still: The Eclipse (2020)

AwardsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sato, Kuriko (March 27, 2009). "Midnight Eye interview: Masanobu Ando". Midnight Eye.
  2. ^ a b ВТОРОЕ РОЖДЕНИЕ МАСАНОБУ АНДО (in Russian). Kimono. Published March 2018. Retrieved 21 February 2019.
  3. ^ Wood, David (October 23, 2000). "BBC – Films – review – Kids Return". BBC.
  4. ^ a b c The Rebirth of Masanobu Ando. Published 2016.
  5. ^ Matthijs, Niels (January 25, 2012). "Review: 46-OKUNEN NO KOI (Personal Favorites #25)". Twitch Film. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  6. ^ Schilling, Mark (January 12, 2007). "'Akuma Tantei' – The Japan Times". The Japan Times. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Harvey, Dennis (September 20, 2011). "Smuggler – Variety". Variety.
  8. ^ "岡田准一「ザ・ファブル」続編、21年公開決定! 堤真一、平手友梨奈、安藤政信が参戦". eiga.com. Retrieved August 19, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "吉岡里帆、鈴木福、満島真之介ら映画『ゾッキ』に豪華キャスト18名". Cinematoday. Retrieved October 21, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ "「るろうに剣心」に桂役で高橋一生、沖田役で村上虹郎、高杉役で安藤政信が出演". Natalie. Retrieved March 2, 2021.
  11. ^ "Hochi Film Award: Past Winners List". The Hochi Shimbun (in Japanese). Retrieved November 25, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "Golden Arrow Awards Winners List" (PDF). Japan Magazine Association (in Japanese). p. 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 18, 2017. Retrieved November 25, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ "Nikkan Sports Film Award: Past Winners". Nikkan Sports News (in Japanese). Retrieved November 25, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ "Japanese Movie Critics Awards Past Winners". Japanese Movie Critics Awards (in Japanese). Archived from the original on July 2, 2015. Retrieved November 25, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ "Kinema Junpo Best Ten". Kinema Junpo (in Japanese). Retrieved November 25, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. ^ "Rotten Tomatoes.com: Masanobu Ando". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved January 30, 2010. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ "20th Japan Academy Prize". Japan Academy Film Prize Association (in Japanese). Retrieved November 25, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. ^ "Mainichi Film Concours: History". The Mainichi Newspapers (in Japanese). Retrieved November 25, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  19. ^ "Tokyo Sports Film Award: Past Winners list". Tokyo Sports (in Japanese). Retrieved November 25, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  20. ^ "18th Yokohama Film Festival". Yokohama Film Festival (in Japanese). Archived from the original on July 14, 2011. Retrieved November 25, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External linksEdit