Masako Mori (singer)

Masako Mori (森 昌子, real name Masako Morita; born October 13, 1958) is a Japanese idol, enka singer, and actress.

Masako Mori
森 昌子
Birth nameMasako Morita (森田 昌子)
Born (1958-10-13) October 13, 1958 (age 61)
OriginUtsunomiya, Tochigi Prefecture, Japan
GenresEnka, kayōkyoku
Occupation(s)Idol, singer, actress
Years active1972–1986, 2006–present
LabelsTokuma Ongaku Kōgyō (1972–1979)
Pony Canyon (1979–2008)
Ongaku Kōbō (2009–2011)
King Records (2012–present)
Websitemorimasako.jp

BiographyEdit

In 1973, she was part of "a hit female trio", which also included musicians Momoe Yamaguchi and Junko Sakurada.[1] The music trio became popular as part of the television program Producing the Stars (Star Tanjō!); they were known as "The Trio of Third-Year Junior High School Students" ("Hana no Chu 3 Trio").[2]

She debuted in 1972,[3] at age 13, with the song "Sensei" [ja] (Professor), receiving numerous music awards for it. The song reached the #3 position on the Oricon charts. Other hits include "Dōkyūsei" [ja] (Classmates), "Chugaku Sannensei" (Junior High School Third Grade), "Okaasan" (Mother) and "Ettou Tsubame" (The Wintering Swallow). She won the Best Singer prize for "Ettou Tsubame" at the 25th Japan Record Awards. She retired when she married Shinichi Mori in 1986, but in 2006 returned to the stage with the single "Bara Iro no Mirai".[4] The song reached the #14 position on the Oricon charts.

In addition to being a singer, she has acted in a number of Japanese movies and TV dramas. ONE OK ROCK vocalist Takahiro Moriuchi and MY FIRST STORY vocalist Hiroki Moriuchi are her and Shinichi Mori's sons.

Masako Mori has performed a total of 15 times at Kōhaku Uta Gassen.

In March of 2019, Masako Mori announced that she was retiring from showbusiness.[5]

DiscographyEdit

Biggest hitsEdit

# Title Date/Position Sales[6][4]
1 Sensei (せんせい)
Debut single and signature song
72-07-01 (#3) 541,000
2 Dōkyūsei (同級生) 72-10-05 (#4) 367,000
3 Chūgaku Sannensei (中学三年生) 73-02-05 (#3) 329,000
4 Yūgao No Ame (夕顔の雨) 73-05-05 (#7) 202,000
5 Shirakaba Nikki (白樺日記) 73-08-25 (#11) 166,000
6 Kinenjyu (記念樹) 73-10-30 (#13) 136,000
7 Shitamachi No Aoi Sora (下町の青い空) 74-04-20 (#15) 119,000
8 Kyō Mo Egao De Konnichiwa (今日も笑顔でこんにちは)
74-07-01 (#12) 129,000
9 Okaasan (おかあさん)
74-09-01 (#21) 104,000
10 Haru No Mezame (春のめざめ) 75-03-01 (#20) 101,000
11 Omokage No Kimi (面影の君) 75-06-01 (#15) 137,000
12 Anata Wo Matte Sannenmitsuki (あなたを待って三年三月) 75-04-01 (#15) 149,000
13 Ano Hito Fune Itchatta (あの人の船行っちゃった)
75-12-01 (#22) 101,000
14 Yūbue No Oka (夕笛の丘) 76-03-01 (#18) 99,000
15 Namida No Sanbashi (なみだの桟橋) 77-07-25 (#28) 97,000
16 Tameiki Bashi (ためいき橋) 79-10-21 (#28) 82,000
17 Kanashimi Honsen Nihonkai (哀しみ本線日本海)
81-07-10 (#36) 143,000
18 Ettou Tsubame (越冬つばめ) 83-08-21 (#27) 111,000
19 Bara Iro No Mirai (バラ色の未来) 06-06-07 (#14) 22,000

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Craig, Timothy J. (2000). Japan Pop!: Inside the World of Japanese Popular Culture. M.E. Sharpe. p. 317. ISBN 0-7656-0561-9.
  2. ^ Mainichi Daily News staff (February 7, 1999). "Bands must dance to producers' beat". Mainichi Daily News.
  3. ^ Billboard Magazine, 1973. Retrieved March 14, 2016.
  4. ^ a b "森昌子 │ オリコン芸能人事典-ORICON STYLE". Oricon.
  5. ^ "Asahi news article" (in Japanese). 朝日新聞. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  6. ^ "Oricon sale history of Masako Mori" (in Japanese). Oricon. Retrieved March 27, 2019.

External linksEdit