Marko Dević

Marko Dević (Serbian Cyrillic: Марко Девић; Ukrainian: Марко Девiч, romanizedMarko Devich;[2][3][4][5] born 27 October 1983) is a Ukrainian retired football player.

Marko Dević
Марко Девић
Marko Dević 2013.jpg
Dević in 2013
Personal information
Full name Marko Dević[1]
Date of birth (1983-10-27) 27 October 1983 (age 38)
Place of birth Belgrade, SR Serbia,
SFR Yugoslavia
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Position(s) Attacking midfielder / Forward
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2001–2002 Zvezdara 14 (2)
2002–2003 Železnik 19 (1)
2003–2004 Radnički Beograd 16 (1)
2004 Voždovac 14 (4)
2005–2006 Volyn Lutsk 32 (2)
2006–2012 Metalist Kharkiv 148 (64)
2012–2013 Shakhtar Donetsk 12 (4)
2013–2014 Metalist Kharkiv 27 (20)
2014–2016 Rubin Kazan 41 (11)
2015Al-Rayyan (loan) 7 (6)
2017 Rostov 6 (1)
2017–2018 Vaduz 30 (13)
2018–2019 Sabah 21 (8)
2019 Voždovac 12 (4)
2020 Sabah 3 (1)
Total 402 (142)
National team
2008–2014 Ukraine 35 (7)
*Club domestic league appearances and goals

A naturalized Ukrainian citizen since 2008, Serbian-born Dević made his international debut for his adopted country in 2008. He has since earned over 30 caps and scored 7 international goals for Ukraine. In 2013, he became the first player to score a hat-trick for the Ukraine national football team in an official match.

Club careerEdit

Early careerEdit

Born in Belgrade (Serbia, SFR Yugoslavia), Dević started his career at his hometown club Zvezdara, making 14 appearances and scoring twice in the 2001–02 season,[6] during which time the club got relegated from the top division.[7] He later played for Železnik, Radnički Beograd and Voždovac, all in Serbia. He spent just one year at each of the clubs. He scored three goals in 20 appearances for Železnik, including one goal in 19 league appearances and two goals in one cup match. He scored once in 16 appearances for Radnički, before joining Voždovac where he scored four times in 14 appearances.

UkraineEdit

Volyn LutskEdit

In 2005, Ukrainian club Volyn Lutsk acquired Dević. During the 2004–05 Ukrainian Premier League season, he made 14 appearances but failed to score a single goal as Volyn finished in 8th position.[8] The following season he netted twice in 18 league appearances for Volyn. At the end of the season the club was relegated.[9] Dević made 32 league appearances for Volyn and one cup appearance, scoring two goals.

Metalist KharkivEdit

 
Dević playing against Malmö FF in November 2011

Myron Markevych brought Dević to Vyscha Liha club Metalist Kharkiv. He scored 4 goals in 27 league appearances in his first season as Metalist finished in 3rd position.[10] In the 2007–08 season, he was the Ukrainian Premier League top scorer with 19 goals in 27 matches played. Close behind him were Oleksandr Hladky, Oleksandr Kosyrin and Yevhen Seleznyov, each with 17 goals.[11] Despite Dević's prolific scoring, Metalist finished in third place once again. Dević had a slow start ro the 2008–09 season but in the 13th round he scored both goals in a 2–0 win over Chornomorets Odessa. He finished the season with eight goals from 24 league matches as Metalist again finished third.[12] Metalist also made it to the round of 16 in the UEFA Cup but lost out to another Ukrainian side, Dynamo Kyiv, on away goals after a 3–3 aggregate score.[13] Dević scored eight goals in 24 league appearances in the 2008–09 season, with Metalist finishing in 3rd place.[12] In the 2009–10 season he netted eight times in 20 league appearances as Metalist finished third.[14] In the 2010–11 season Dević topped the assist table for the season with 9 assists. He also managed 14 goals in 24 league appearances to become the second highest goal scorer behind Yevhen Seleznyov of Dnipro, helping Metalist to a 3rd-place finish.[15] The 2011–12 season saw Dević score 11 goals from 26 league matches as Metalist finished 3rd for the sixth season in a row.[16] Metalist also progressed to the quarter final stage of the Europa League, losing out to Portuguese side Sporting 3–2 on aggregate.[17] Dević scored five goals and three assists in 484 minutes of play in the competition, finishing in a tie for eighth place in the scoring charts.

He left the club in 2012 after six seasons to join the reigning Ukrainian Premier League champions Shakhtar Donetsk. Dević managed to score 64 goals in 148 league appearances for Metalist and 75 from 192 appearances in all competitions.

Shakhtar DonetskEdit

Dević joined Shakhtar during the 2012–13 Premier League season on a four-year contract[18] for a fee of £4.4 million. Although he had the number 33 at Metalist, he instead took number 18 at Shakhtar as the number 33 shirt was already assigned to Darijo Srna. He made his first appearance for Shakhtar as a 77th-minute substitute for Alex Teixeira in a 2–0 victory over Metalurh Donetsk in the 2012 Super Cup.[19] This success marked Dević's first trophy. His league debut for Shakhtar came in a comprehensive 6–0 victory over Arsenal Kyiv. He came on as a substitute for Alex Teixeira in the 69th minute and scored his first goal for Shakhtar, a penalty, in the 94th minute of the match.[20] His first start came in a commanding 4–0 victory over Volyn Lutsk. He scored the first goal of the match after 4 minutes and added an assist for Henrikh Mkhitaryan.[21] He scored another goal in a 4–1 win against Vorskla.[22]

Return to MetalistEdit

On 28 February 2013, Dević returned to Metalist on a four-year deal.[23]

RussiaEdit

On 27 February 2014, Dević signed a four-year deal with Rubin Kazan, where he played 14 games and scored 3 goals. In January 2015, he was sent for a loan to Qatar's Al Rayyan, where he played 18 games and scored 11 goals. He helped his team win promotion to the Qatar Stars League.

On 17 January 2017, Dević signed a 1.5-year deal with a Russian Premier League club FC Rostov.[24] After only six months, Dević left Rostov on 17 June 2017.[25]

Later careerEdit

On 7 August 2017, he joined FC Vaduz.[26]

On 4 August 2018, Dević signed a two-year contract with Sabah FC.[27]

On 16 January 2020, Sabah announced the return of Dević on a contract until the end of the 2019–20 season.[28] Dević left Sabah on 24 April 2020.[29]

International careerEdit

 
Dević in action against Austria in June 2012

In June 2008, Dević became a naturalized Ukrainian citizen in hopes of playing for the Ukraine national football team.[30] Although Dević is not the first footballer from outside the former Soviet Union to accept Ukrainian citizenship, his decision has led to numerous discussions in the media on the adoption of foreign players. The first international player to become a naturalized Ukrainian was Mamadi Sangare from Conakry, Guinea, who in 2008 played for FC Desna Chernihiv, and before that FC CSKA Kyiv.

Dević also had a very successful season in 2007–08, scoring 19 goals and becoming top scorer, putting pressure on national team coach Olexiy Mykhailychenko to select him. But Mykhailychenko hesitated, stating that one great season might not be enough to justify Devic's selection for Ukraine. Nonetheless, he did cap Dević for a friendly match against Norway on 19 November 2008,[31] becoming the third naturalized citizen on the Ukraine national football team called up at that time, along with Oleksandr Aliyev and Artem Milevskyi. Dević played the second half of the match and wore the number 10 shirt. In the next couple of years his match participation dropped noticeably, due to his low performance in the Premier League as well as not scoring with the national team.

Dević was a member of Ukraine's squad for UEFA Euro 2012. On 19 June 2012, he was in the starting line-up for the game against England in the final round of games before the quarter-finals. Ukraine lost 0–1, with Wayne Rooney's second-half header carrying England through at the Donbass Arena in Donetsk. However, Dević had a goal disallowed in the second half when John Terry hooked the ball clear off the goal line, as confirmed by video replays.[32] England ultimately won Group D and advanced along with France, while Ukraine were eliminated. Dević's "ghost goal" reopened football's goal-line technology debate.[33][34] Replays of the build-up also appeared to show Dević's teammate, Artem Milevskyi, who set up Dević, in an offside position when the ball was played to him, although the play was not flagged for offside by match officials.[35] On the following day, however, UEFA and its chief refereeing officer, Pierluigi Collina, delivered their final verdict: match officials had erroneously denied Dević and Ukraine a legitimate goal.[36][37]

Career statisticsEdit

ClubEdit

As of 28 April 2020[6]
Club Season League Cup Continental Super Cup Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Zvezdara 2001–02 First League of Serbia and Montenegro 14 2 0 0 14 2
Železnik 2002–03 First League of Serbia and Montenegro 19 1 1 2 20 3
Radnički Beograd 2003–04 Second League of Serbia and Montenegro 16 1 0 0 16 1
Voždovac 2004–05 Second League of Serbia and Montenegro 14 4 0 0 14 4
Volyn Lutsk 2004–05 Vyshcha Liha 14 0 0 0 14 0
2005–06 18 2 1 0 19 2
Total 32 2 1 0 33 2
Metalist Kharkiv 2006–07 Ukrainian Premier League 27 4 5 0 32 4
2007–08 27 19 1 1 2 0 30 20
2008–09 24 8 3 2 9 1 36 11
2009–10 20 8 1 0 4 0 25 8
2010–11 24 14 0 0 6 2 30 16
2011–12 26 11 0 0 13 5 39 16
Total 148 64 10 3 34 8 192 75
Shakhtar Donetsk 2012–13 Ukrainian Premier League 12 4 1 0 2 0 1 0 16 4
Metalist Kharkiv 2012–13 Ukrainian Premier League 10 5 0 0 0 0 10 5
2013–14 17 15 2 1 2 2 21 18
Total 27 20 2 1 2 2 31 23
Rubin Kazan 2013–14 Russian Premier League 11 3 0 0 0 0 11 3
2014–15 3 0 0 0 3 0
2015–16 19 7 0 0 6 2 25 9
2016–17 8 1 2 1 10 2
Total 41 11 2 1 6 2 49 14
Al-Rayyan (loan) 2014–15 Qatari Second Division 7 6 4 1 7 4 18 11
Rostov 2016–17 Russian Premier League 6 1 0 0 2 0 8 1
Vaduz 2017–18 Swiss Challenge League 30 13 3 3 0 0 33 16
Sabah 2018–19 Azerbaijan Premier League 21 8 0 0 21 8
Voždovac 2019–20 Serbian SuperLiga 12 4 1 0 13 4
Sabah 2019–20 Azerbaijan Premier League 3 1 0 0 3 1
Career total 402 142 25 11 53 16 1 0 481 169

InternationalEdit

As of 28 November 2018[38]
Ukraine national team
Year Apps Goals
2008 1 0
2009 1 0
2010 5 0
2011 10 2
2012 11 0
2013 5 4
2014 2 1
Total 35 7

International goalsEdit

Scores and results list Ukraine's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1 9 February 2011 GSP Stadium, Nicosia   Sweden 1–1 1–1 Friendly
2 15 November 2011 Arena Lviv, Lviv   Austria 2–1 2–1
3 6 September 2013   San Marino 1–0 9–0 2014 World Cup qualifier
4 15 October 2013 Stadio Olimpico, Serravalle 0–2 0–8
5 0–4
6 0–6
7 5 March 2014 Antonis Papadopoulos Stadium, Larnaca   United States 0–2 0–2 Friendly

HonoursEdit

Radnički Beograd
Shakhtar Donetsk
Al-Rayyan
Vaduz
Individual

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Marko Dević". UEFA. Retrieved 10 June 2012.
  2. ^ Profile at the Football Federation of Ukraine webpage
  3. ^ Profile at the Ukrainian Premier League webpage
  4. ^ Photo with a jersey with name spelled as Девіч, not Девич at the Metalist Kharkiv webpage
  5. ^ "Marko Devich". FIFA. Archived from the original on 16 January 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2012.
  6. ^ a b http://srbijafudbal.com/vozdovac/devic.htm
  7. ^ "Marko Dević". UEFA. Retrieved 18 October 2014.
  8. ^ "Ukrainian Premier League standings 2004/05". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  9. ^ "Ukraine 2005/06". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  10. ^ "Ukraine 2006/07". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  11. ^ Сезон 2007-2008 (in Ukrainian). UAFootball.net.ua. Retrieved 29 November 2013.
  12. ^ a b "Ukraine 2008/09". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  13. ^ "Dynamo hold off tenacious Metalist". 19 March 2009. Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  14. ^ "Ukraine 2009/10". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  15. ^ "Ukraine 2010/11". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  16. ^ "Ukraine 2011/12". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  17. ^ "Metalist pay the penalty as Sporting progress". 5 April 2012. Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  18. ^ "Marko Dević signed up by FC Shakhtar" (25 May 2012). shakhtar.com/en. FC Shakhtar Donetsk. Retrieved 20 October 2014.
  19. ^ "Metalurh Donetsk vs Shakhtar 0–2". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  20. ^ "Shakhtar vs Arsenal Kyiv 6–0". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  21. ^ "Volyn vs Shakhtar 0–4". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  22. ^ "Shakhtar vs Vorskla 4–1". Retrieved 1 October 2012.
  23. ^ Linnyk, Igor (28 February 2013). "Shakhtar let Dević make Metalist return". UEFA. Retrieved 18 October 2014.
  24. ^ Добро пожаловать, Марко! (in Russian). FC Rostov. 17 January 2017.
  25. ^ Марко Девич покинул Ростов. fc-rostov.ru (in Russian). FC Rostov. 17 June 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  26. ^ "Marko Devic zum FC Vaduz" (in German). FC Vaduz. 7 August 2017.
  27. ^ "Ukraynalı hücumçu Marko Deviçlə 2 illik müqavilə bağlanıb". facebook.com (in Azerbaijani). Sabail FK. 4 August 2018. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  28. ^ "MARKO DEVİÇ "SABAH"DA!". sabahfc.az/ (in Azerbaijani). Sabah FC. 16 January 2020. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  29. ^ "TƏŞƏKKÜRLƏR, MARKO!". sabahfc.az/ (in Azerbaijani). Sabah FC. 24 April 2020. Retrieved 28 April 2020.
  30. ^ Марко Девич: "Очень рад, что получил гражданство Украины" [Marko Dević: "I am very happy to have received Ukrainian citizenship"] (in Ukrainian). UA-Football.com. 3 July 2008. Retrieved 29 November 2013.
  31. ^ Михайличенко викликав трьох гравців "Металіста" [Mykhailychenko called up three players from "Metalist"] (in Ukrainian). UA-Football.com. 10 November 2008. Retrieved 29 November 2013.
  32. ^ Tidey, Will (19 June 2012). "Ukraine vs. England: Marko Devic Enters Goal-Line Technology Hall of Shame". The Bleacher Report. Retrieved 19 June 2012.
  33. ^ "5 Famous Soccer Goal-Line Controversies". The Washington Post. 19 June 2012. Archived from the original on 8 September 2019. Retrieved 19 June 2012.
  34. ^ "England, France through to Euro 2012 quarters". Herald Sun. 20 June 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2012.
  35. ^ "Rooney seizes his chance to lift England's expectations". The Independent. 20 June 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2012.
  36. ^ "Euro 2012: Uefa admits Ukraine were deprived of a goal against England". The Guardian. 20 June 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2012.
  37. ^ "Euro 2012: Ukraine goal crossed the line and should have been given says Uefa referee chief Pierluigi Collina". The Daily Telegraph. 20 June 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2012.
  38. ^ "Dević, Marko". National Football Teams. Benjamin Strack-Zimmermann. Retrieved 16 December 2011.

External linksEdit