Open main menu

Mark Sedwill

Sir Mark Philip Sedwill KCMG (born 21 October 1964) is a British diplomat and senior civil servant who has served as Cabinet Secretary and Head of the Civil Service since 2018.[1] He has served as National Security Adviser since 2017. He previously served as the United Kingdom's Ambassador to Afghanistan from 2009 to 2010 and as the NATO Senior Civilian Representative in Afghanistan in 2010. He was the Permanent Secretary at the Home Office from February 2013 to April 2017.

Sir Mark Sedwill
KCMG
Mark Sedwill.jpg
Mark Sedwill
Cabinet Secretary
Assumed office
24 October 2018
Acting: 25 June 2018 - 24 October 2018
Prime MinisterTheresa May
Preceded bySir Jeremy Heywood
Head of the Home Civil Service
Assumed office
4 November 2018
Prime MinisterTheresa May
Preceded bySir Jeremy Heywood
National Security Adviser
Assumed office
13 April 2017
Prime MinisterTheresa May
Preceded bySir Mark Lyall Grant
Director, Afghanistan & Pakistan of the
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
In office
2010–2012
Prime MinisterDavid Cameron
Preceded byKaren Pierce
NATO Senior Civilian Representative in Afghanistan
In office
January 2010 – June 2010
Prime MinisterGordon Brown
David Cameron
Preceded byFernando Gentilini
Succeeded bySimon Gass
Personal details
BornMark Philip Sedwill
(1964-10-21) 21 October 1964 (age 54)
Ealing, England
NationalityBritish
Alma materUniversity of St Andrews
St Edmund Hall, Oxford

Contents

Early life and educationEdit

Sedwill was born in Ealing. He attended Bourne Grammar School in Bourne, Lincolnshire, becoming the Head Boy. He went to the University of St Andrews, where he gained a Bachelor of Science (BSc), and later gained a Master of Philosophy (MPhil) in economics from St Edmund Hall, Oxford.[2][3]

CareerEdit

Early diplomatic careerEdit

Sedwill joined the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in 1989 and he served in the Security Coordination Department and the Gulf War Emergency Unit until 1991.

He was then posted in Cairo, Egypt, from 1991 to 1994 as a Second Secretary, then First Secretary in Iraq from 1996 to 1997 whilst serving as a United Nations weapons inspector, then in Nicosia, Cyprus, as First Secretary for Political-Military Affairs and Counterterrorism from 1997 to 1999. He was the Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (Robin Cook and later Jack Straw) from 2000 to 2002 in the run-up to and preparations for the 2003 Iraq invasion.[2]

He then served as the Deputy High Commissioner to Pakistan, based in Islamabad from 2003 to 2005, then the Deputy Director for the Middle East and North Africa Department of the Foreign Office. From 2006 to 2008, he served as International Director of the UK Border Agency, part of the Home Office.[2][4]

Afghanistan ambassador and NATO rolesEdit

In April 2009, Sedwill became the Ambassador to Afghanistan, succeeding Sherard Cowper-Coles. In January 2010, he was additionally appointed as NATO's Senior Civilian Representative in Afghanistan, to be the civilian counterpart to the ISAF Commander, U.S. General Stanley A. McChrystal and then U.S. General David Petraeus.[5][6] He was succeeded as ambassador temporarily by his predecessor, Cowper-Coles, and then by William Patey, formerly British Ambassador to Saudi Arabia.[2]

In May 2011, Sedwill took over as the FCO's Director-General for Afghanistan and Pakistan (and thus as the UK's Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan) from Karen Pierce CMG. He additionally became the FCO's Director-General, Political in Autumn 2012, replacing Geoffrey Adams.

Home Office and National Security AdviserEdit

In February 2013, Sedwill became the Permanent Secretary at the Home Office, filling the vacancy left by Helen Ghosh.[7][8] Sedwill replaced Mark Lyall Grant as National Security Adviser in the Cabinet Office in April 2017.

Cabinet SecretaryEdit

He became acting Cabinet Secretary in June 2018, while Jeremy Heywood took a leave of absence on medical grounds, and was appointed to replace Heywood on his retirement on 24 October 2018.[9] He is the second Cabinet Secretary never to have worked at HM Treasury, and the first whose career has been dominated by diplomatic and security work.[3][10] He was described as the "Prime Minister's first and only choice" to replace Heywood, with no recruitment process taking place, with some suggesting the urgency of arrangements for the UK's departure from the European Union as a reason for the quick appointment.[3][10][11] Prime Minister Theresa May was criticised for allowing Sedwill to remain as National Security Adviser alongside his role as Cabinet Secretary, with speculation that the role was being kept for Europe adviser Oliver Robbins.[10][12][13]

Personal lifeEdit

Sedwill married in 1999 and has one daughter. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and a Fellow of the Institute of Directors.[2]

HonoursEdit

He was appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George in 2008, and a Knight Commander in 2017.[2][14][15]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Sir Mark Sedwill - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. Retrieved 2018-11-04.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "SEDWILL, Mark Philip". Who's Who 2013. A & C Black. December 2012. Retrieved 2013-01-11.
  3. ^ a b c "The quiet rise of "securocrat" Mark Sedwill, the new head of the civil service". www.newstatesman.com. Retrieved 2018-10-31.
  4. ^ "300,000 UK visas 'wrongly issued'". BBC News. 18 November 2008. Retrieved 21 May 2011.
  5. ^ "Ambassador Mark Sedwill". NATO. Retrieved 21 May 2011.
  6. ^ Foreign & Commonwealth Office (26 January 2010). "NATO names Mark Sedwill as Senior Civilian Representative". Her Majesty's Government. Archived from the original on 15 November 2010. Retrieved 21 May 2011.
  7. ^ "Cabinet office: new senior appointments and changes - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. Retrieved 2017-03-05.
  8. ^ "New permanent secretary for the Home Office". Home Office website. Her Majesty's Government. 2013-01-09. Retrieved 2013-01-11.
  9. ^ Statement on Sir Jeremy Heywood, gov.uk, 24 October 2018
  10. ^ a b c Blitz, James (25 October 2018). "Critics question dual role for Britain's new top civil servant". Financial Times. Retrieved 2018-10-31.
  11. ^ "Sir Mark Sedwill appointed Cabinet Secretary by Theresa May for 'no-nonsense approach' during Brexit deal". inews.co.uk. 2018-10-25. Retrieved 2018-10-31.
  12. ^ "Security experts raise concern over top civil servant's double role". Evening Standard. Retrieved 2018-10-31.
  13. ^ "Twin role of top civil servant and security adviser 'only temporary'". Evening Standard. Retrieved 2018-10-31.
  14. ^ "No. 58729". The London Gazette (Supplement). 2008-06-14. p. 3.
  15. ^ "Mark SEDWILL". www.thegazette.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-10-31.

External linksEdit

Video clipsEdit

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Sir Sherard Cowper-Coles
British Ambassador to Afghanistan
2009–10
Succeeded by
Sir William Patey
Preceded by
Fernando Gentilini
NATO Senior Civilian Representative in Afghanistan
January–June 2010
Succeeded by
Sir Simon Gass
Preceded by
Karen Pierce
Director, Afghanistan & Pakistan of the
Foreign and Commonwealth Office

2010–2012
Succeeded by
Richard Crompton
as Director, South Asia and Afghanistan
Preceded by
Sir Geoffrey Adams
Director-General, Political of the
Foreign and Commonwealth Office

2012–2013
Succeeded by
Sir Simon Gass
Government offices
Preceded by
Dame Helen Ghosh
Permanent Secretary of the
Home Office

2013–2017
Succeeded by
Philip Rutnam
Preceded by
Sir Mark Lyall Grant
National Security Adviser
2017–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Sir Jeremy Heywood
Cabinet Secretary
2018–present
Incumbent