Marian Zieliński

Marian Zieliński (24 December 1929 – 13 October 2005) was a Polish weightlifter. He competed at the 1956, 1960, 1964 and 1968 Olympics and won bronze medals in 1956, 1964 and 1968, placing fourth in 1960. He held the world and European titles in 1959 and 1963.[1][2] Zieliński set three ratified world records: two in the snatch in 1958 and one in the clean and jerk in 1964.[3]

Marian Zieliński
Marian Zieliński 1963cr.jpg
Zieliński in 1963
Personal information
Born24 December 1929
Chełm, Poland[1]
Died13 October 2005 (aged 75)
Warsaw, Poland
Height160 cm (5 ft 3 in)[1][2]
Sport
Sportweightlifting
ClubLegia Warszawa[1]
Coached byJózef Styczyński[1]
Medal record
Representing  Poland
Olympic Games
Bronze medal – third place 1956 Melbourne -60 kg
Bronze medal – third place 1964 Tokyo -67.5 kg
Bronze medal – third place 1968 Mexico City -67.5 kg
World Championships
Gold medal – first place 1959 Warsaw -60 kg
Bronze medal – third place 1961 Vienna -67.5 kg
Bronze medal – third place 1962 Budapest -67.5 kg
Gold medal – first place 1963 Stockholm -67.5 kg
Bronze medal – third place 1964 Tokyo -67.5 kg
Silver medal – second place 1965 Tehran -67.5 kg
Silver medal – second place 1966 East Berlin -67.5 kg
Bronze medal – third place 1968 Mexico City -67.5 kg
European Championships
Bronze medal – third place 1956 Helskinki -60 kg
Bronze medal – third place 1957 Katowice -67.5 kg
Gold medal – first place 1959 Warsaw -60 kg
Gold medal – first place 1960 Milan -67.5 kg
Bronze medal – third place 1961 Vienna -67.5 kg
Bronze medal – third place 1962 Budapest -67.5 kg
Gold medal – first place 1963 Stockholm -67.5 kg
Silver medal – second place 1966 East Berlin -67.5 kg
Silver medal – second place 1968 Leningrad -67.5 kg

Zieliński took up weightlifting in the early 1950s, and retired in 1970. He then coached weightlifters until 1978, and after that worked as a painter, sculptor and jeweler. He was married to Jadwiga Nienartowicz and had two sons, Andrzej (born 1958) and Mark (born 1960), both live in Canada.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f Profile. pkol.pl (in Polish)
  2. ^ a b Marian Zieliński. sports-reference.com
  3. ^ Marian Zieliński. chidlovski.net