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Margo J. Anderson

Margo J. Anderson (also published as Margo Anderson Conk)[1] is an American social historian and historian of statistics known for her studies of the United States Census and on the history of Pittsburgh and Milwaukee. She is a distinguished professor of history at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee,[2] and a former president of the Social Science History Association.[1]

Education and careerEdit

Anderson studied history as an undergraduate at Bucknell University, graduating summa cum laude in 1967. She earned a master's degree and PhD from Rutgers University in 1972 and 1978 respectively.[1]

She taught briefly as an instructor at Vassar College before joining the Wisconsin–Milwaukee faculty in 1977. At Milwaukee, she chaired the history department from 1992 to 1995, directed the Urban Studies Program from 2001 to 2005, and became a distinguished professor in 2013.[1]

She was president of the Social Science History Association in 2006.[1]

BooksEdit

Anderson is the author or editor of:

  • The United States Census and Labor Force Change: A History of Occupation Statistics, 1870-1940 (UMI Research Press, 1980)[3]
  • The American Census: A Social History (Yale Univ. Press, 1988; 2nd ed., 2015)[4]
  • Pittsburgh Surveyed: Social Science and Social Reform in the Early Twentieth Century (edited with Maurine W. Greenwald, 1996)[5]
  • Encyclopedia of the U.S. Census (edited with Constance F. Citro and Joseph J. Salvo; CQ Press, 2000; 2nd ed., 2012)[6]
  • Who Counts? The Politics of Census-Taking in Contemporary America (with Stephen Fienberg; Russell Sage 1999 and 2001)[7]
  • Perspectives on Milwaukee’s Past (edited with Victor Greene; University of Illinois Press, 2009)[8]
  • Bibliography of Metropolitan Milwaukee (with Ann M. Graf and Amanda I. Seligman; Marquette University Press, 2014)

Awards and honorsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f Curriculum vitae (PDF), September 2016, retrieved 2017-10-17
  2. ^ Faculty, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Department of History, retrieved 2017-10-17
  3. ^ Reviews of The United States Census and Labor Force Change: A History of Occupation Statistics, 1870-1940: Albert W. Niemi (June 1981), The Journal of Economic History 41 (2): 471, doi:10.1017/S0022050700044119; Bruce Laurie (Spring 1982), International Labor and Working-Class History 21: 139–144, JSTOR 27671424.
  4. ^ Reviews of The American Census: A Social History: Robert V. Wells (October 21, 1988), "Sociopolitical Enumerations", Science 242 (4877): 448–450, doi:10.1126/science.242.4877.448-a; Philip Morrison (April 1989), Scientific American 260 (4): 123–125, JSTOR 24987226; Theodore Porter (June 1989), Isis 80 (2): 296–298, doi:10.1086/355018; William Petersen (July 1989), American Journal of Sociology 95 (1): 202–203, JSTOR 2780420; Richard Jensen (September 1989), Journal of American History 76 (2): 573, doi:10.2307/1908000; Jeremy Atack (September 1989), Journal of Economic History 49 (3): 769–771, doi:10.1017/S0022050700009207; Kenneth J. Winkle (September 1989), "The Census and Society", Reviews in American History 17 (3): 341–345, doi:10.2307/2702830; John F. McClymer (November 1989), The Historian 52 (1): 142, JSTOR 24447654; Karol J. Krótki (1989), Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series D (The Statistician) 38 (4): 312–314, doi:10.2307/2349072; William R.Thompson (1989), Government Information Quarterly 6 (3): 313–314, doi:10.1016/0740-624X(89)90072-5; Robert P. Swierenga (April 1990), The American Historical Review 95 (2): 577–578, doi:10.1086/ahr/95.2.577; Daniel Melnick (June 1990), Journal of the American Statistical Association 85 (410): 602–603, JSTOR 2289824; Michael R. Haines (Autumn 1990), Journal of Social History 24 (1): 180–182, JSTOR 3787647; Howard L. Green (Winter 1990), The Public Historian 12 (1): 105–107, doi:10.2307/3378333; Mary C. Waters (Spring 1991), Journal of American Ethnic History 10 (3): 70–72, JSTOR 27500845.
  5. ^ Reviews of Pittsburgh Surveyed: John F. McClymer (September 1997), Journal of American History 84 (2): 695–696, doi:10.2307/2952670; Rob Ruck (Autumn 1997), Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies 64 (4): 575–577, JSTOR 27774043; Ileen A. DeVault (January 1998), Contemporary Sociology 27 (1): 55–56, JSTOR 2654716.
  6. ^ Reviews of Encyclopedia of the U.S. Census: Ben Amata (2002), Government Information Quarterly 19 (4): 427–428, doi:10.1016/S0740-624X(02)00126-0; Shari Laster (Summer 2013), Reference & User Services Quarterly 52 (4): 352, JSTOR refuseserq.52.4.352.
  7. ^ Reviews of Who Counts? The Politics of Census-Taking in Contemporary America: Harvey M. Choldin (December 1999), Population and Development Review 25 (4): 797–799, JSTOR 172492; Thomas R. Belin (January 14, 2000): Science 287 (5451): 239–240, JSTOR 3074473; M. S. Ridout (June 2000), Biometrics 56 (2): 648, JSTOR 2677016; A. Morning (2000), Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 26 (4): 749, doi:10.1080/713680502; Ernest M. T So (2001), Technometrics 43 (2): 242, doi:10.1198/tech.2001.s600; Don Ylvisaker (2001), Journal of the American Statistical Association 96 (453): 339–341 doi:10.1198/016214501750332901; Barbara Everitt Bryant (Winter 2002), The Public Opinion Quarterly 66 (4): 636–640, JSTOR 3078714.
  8. ^ Reviews of Perspectives on Milwaukee's Past: Roger D. Simon (June 2010), The Journal of American History 97 (1): 218–220, JSTOR 40662913; Mary Wingerd (2010), Annals of Iowa 69 (3): 351–352, [1]; Thomas J. Jablonsky (Spring 2012), Journal of American Ethnic History 31 (3): 114–115, doi:10.5406/jamerethnhist.31.3.0114.

External linksEdit