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Margarita Mariscal de Gante

Margarita Mariscal de Gante (born 10 January 1954) is a Spanish judge and politician, who served as the minister of justice from 1996 to 2000.

Margarita Mariscal de Gante
(Mariscal de Gante) Miguel Ángel Rodríguez durante la rueda de prensa posterior al Consejo de Ministros junto a la ministra de Justicia. Pool Moncloa. 23 de agosto de 1996 (cropped).jpeg
de Gante in 1996
First Vice President of the Chamber of Deputies
In office
9 April 2002 – 20 January 2004
Preceded byFrancisco Camps
Succeeded byCarme Chacón
Member of the Congress of Deputies
In office
12 March 2000 – 2 April 2004
ConstituencyAlbacete
Minister of Justice
In office
6 May 1996 – 28 April 2000
Preceded byJuan Alberto Belloch
Succeeded byÁngel Acebes
Personal details
Born (1954-01-10) 10 January 1954 (age 65)
Madrid
NationalitySpanish

Early lifeEdit

Gante was born in Madrid on 10 January 1954. She is the daughter of Jaime Mariscal de Ghent, a judge of the Public Order Tribunal created in Francoist Spain. The brother of this judge, Commissioner Mariscal de Gante, is also known for having invited the torturer Billy el Niño, the alias of Antonio González Pacheco, to celebrate in a police station in Madrid. [1] She has a law degree.[2]

CareerEdit

Gante worked as a judge in different cities of Spain before she attained her ministerial appointment.[2] She is a member of the Popular party.[1] She was appointed minister of justice on 6 May 1996, replacing Juan Alberto Belloch in the post.[2][3] She was in office until 28 April 2000 and Ángel Acebes replaced her as justice minister.[3][4] She was elected to the congress of deputies in 2000, representing Albacete Province, and served there until 2004.[1] During her term she was the first vice-president of the congress.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Mariscal de Gante Mirón, Margarita". Congress of Deputies. Retrieved 5 June 2013.
  2. ^ a b c "Magistral conservadora". El Pais. 5 May 1996. Retrieved 5 June 2013.
  3. ^ a b "Spanish ministries". Rulers. Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  4. ^ a b "Spain Ministers". Women Guide. Retrieved 5 June 2013.