March 1936

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The following events occurred in March 1936:

March 1, 1936 (Sunday)Edit

March 2, 1936 (Monday)Edit

March 3, 1936 (Tuesday)Edit

  • The Italian government had the four largest banks in the country declared public banks.[5]

March 4, 1936 (Wednesday)Edit

March 5, 1936 (Thursday)Edit

March 6, 1936 (Friday)Edit

  • Adolf Hitler summoned the Reichstag for Saturday at noon. International speculation abounded as to what the purpose of the session might be, as all that was announced for the agenda was "acceptance of a declaration of the German government."[8][9]
  • Yugoslavian Prime Minister Milan Stojadinović survived an assassination attempt when a Macedonian deputy shot at him on the floor of the Chamber. Stojadinović was unhurt as another deputy struck the assailant's arm and caused the shots to go wild.[10]
  • Born: Marion Barry, civil rights activist and politician, in Itta Bena, Mississippi (d. 2014)
  • Died: Rubin Goldmark, 63, American composer

March 7, 1936 (Saturday)Edit

March 8, 1936 (Sunday)Edit

March 9, 1936 (Monday)Edit

March 10, 1936 (Tuesday)Edit

March 11, 1936 (Wednesday)Edit

March 12, 1936 (Thursday)Edit

  • Britain, France, Belgium and Italy (the signatories of the Locarno Treaties besides Germany) formally protested the German government's renunciation of the Locarno Pact. The League of Nations also noted it as a violation of international law.[20]
  • Germany threatened to enter a state of "honourable isolation" and increase its military presence in the Rhineland if France and Belgium continued to mass troops on their eastern borders.[21]

March 13, 1936 (Friday)Edit

  • Leftist rioters burned down churches and a newspaper plant in Madrid.[22][23]
  • 18 died in flooding across the northeastern United States and Canada.[24]

March 14, 1936 (Saturday)Edit

March 15, 1936 (Sunday)Edit

  • Hitler set two conditions before Germany would agree to send an envoy to a conference on the Rhineland dispute. First, Germany would have equal rights with those of the other powers present. Second, the powers would immediately enter negotiations for peace pacts with Germany. France was infuriated by the second condition and insisted that no such peace proposals could be discussed until German troops were withdrawn from the Rhineland.[26]
  • Serge Mdivani of the aristocratic Mdivani family was killed in a polo accident in Delray Beach, Florida.[27]
  • Born: Howard Greenfield, songwriter, in Brooklyn, New York (d. 1986)

March 16, 1936 (Monday)Edit

March 17, 1936 (Tuesday)Edit

  • The Pittsburgh Flood of 1936 was the worst flood in the city's history. At least 10 were dead in nearby Johnstown.[28]
  • Soviet Foreign Affairs Minister Maxim Litvinov told the League of Nations that it would become a "laughing stock" and could not be preserved "if it does not carry out its own decisions, but to the contrary accustoms the aggressor to ignore its recommendations, its admonitions and its warnings." Litvinov expressed skepticism of Hitler's proposals for peace, pointing out that the Locarno Treaties already represented just such a pact.[29]
  • Born: Patty Maloney, actress, in Perkinsville, New York

March 18, 1936 (Wednesday)Edit

March 19, 1936 (Thursday)Edit

  • The known death toll in the flooding across twelve U.S. states rose to 150.[33]
  • President Roosevelt appealed for donations to the American Red Cross to help the flood victims.[34]
  • In London, the Council of the League of Nations formally condemned Germany as a breaker of treaties. Joachim von Ribbentrop had pleaded for the delegates to delay the vote and take more time to consider Germany's peace offer, to no avail.[35]
  • Italy and Albania signed a new series of economic agreements between the two countries.[20]
  • Born: Ursula Andress, actress and model, in Ostermundigen, Switzerland

March 20, 1936 (Friday)Edit

  • The Polish government backed down on its plan to outlaw kosher slaughtering of animals. An amendment to the bill was passed allowing religious communities to slaughter animals according to their practice.[36]
  • Born: Lee "Scratch" Perry, reggae producer, in Kendal, Jamaica

March 21, 1936 (Saturday)Edit

  • President Roosevelt allocated $25 million for flood relief in addition to the $18.4 million already allotted through emergency funds.[37]
  • The Noël Coward one-act play Star Chamber premiered in London.
  • Born: Ed Broadbent, politician and political scientist, in Oshawa, Canada
  • Died: Alexander Glazunov, 70, Russian composer

March 22, 1936 (Sunday)Edit

  • Italian warplanes bombed Jijiga for more than an hour in the most intense aerial bombardment of the war to date.[3][38]
  • The musical drama film The Great Ziegfeld premiered in Los Angeles.[39]

March 23, 1936 (Monday)Edit

  • Mussolini created the National Council of Guilds, representing 23 professional corporations. All large private industries in the country were nationalized.[40][41]
  • The League of Nations Committee of Thirteen called upon the International Committee of the Red Cross to supply any information it could offer regarding accusations of Italian troops using poison gas in Ethiopia. The Red Cross denied the request, explaining that the "neutrality which the International Red Cross Committee is bound to observe makes it necessary for the Committee to exercise very great discretion."[42]
  • Died: Oscar Asche, 65, Australian actor, director and writer

March 24, 1936 (Tuesday)Edit

March 25, 1936 (Wednesday)Edit

  • Britain, France and the United States signed the Second London Naval Treaty, limiting tonnage and gun size for each ship category. However, the restrictions were slight and the agreement had many loopholes.[20]
  • International Committee of the Red Cross President Max Huber went to Rome to discuss an investigation of the Italian bombing of Red Cross units. Italy set its conditions: the question of poison gas would be excluded from any investigation, no Ethiopians could participate and Italy could not appear to be standing trial. Huber left with a promise from Mussolini to respect the Red Cross flag, but nothing more.[48]

March 26, 1936 (Thursday)Edit

March 27, 1936 (Friday)Edit

  • Reynoldstown won the Grand National horse race for the second straight year.

March 28, 1936 (Saturday)Edit

March 29, 1936 (Sunday)Edit

  • Parliamentary elections were held in Germany. No opposition parties were allowed and the Nazis claimed almost 99% of the vote.[51] Polling booths were established in the air for the first time in history, as the Hindenburg and Graf Zeppelin cruised over the Saar and Rhineland all day long as passengers and crew voted.[52]
  • Two large squadrons of Italian bombers pounded Harar for two and a half hours, setting the city ablaze. Ethiopian Red Cross and Egyptian Red Crescent hospitals were also bombed despite being clearly marked and set off some distance from the city.[3]

March 30, 1936 (Monday)Edit

  • The Palestine Broadcasting Service was inaugurated.
  • Iran informed the U.S. State Department that it was closing its diplomatic and consular offices in the country due to treatment of Iranian subjects in the American press. The controversy stemmed from an incident the previous October when Iranian diplomat Ghaffer Djalal was arrested for speeding. Despite Djalal's claims that his diplomatic immunity was violated, comments in the American press said that even diplomats should obey speed laws.[53]

March 31, 1936 (Tuesday)Edit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Tageseinträge für 1. März 1936". chroniknet. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  2. ^ Harris, Brice (1964). The United States and the Italo-Ethiopian Crisis. Stanford, California: Leland Stanford Junior University. pp. 132–133.
  3. ^ a b c d Pearce, Jeff (2014). Prevail: The Inspiring Story of Ethiopia's Victory over Mussolini's Invasion, 1935–1941. Skyhorse Publishing. ISBN 978-1-63220-096-9.
  4. ^ "Shikat Beats O'Mahoney to Regain Title". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 3, 1936. p. 21.
  5. ^ "Italy Seizes Banks; Gains in Ethiopia". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 3, 1936. p. 1.
  6. ^ "British Ambulance Bombed". The Advertiser. Adelaide: 23. March 6, 1936.
  7. ^ "Link German on Trial as Spy to Wartime Acts Against U.S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 5, 1936. p. 4.
  8. ^ "Tageseinträge für 6. März 1936". chroniknet. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  9. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 7, 1936). "Hitler Speaks Today; Alarm Sweeps Europe". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  10. ^ "Assassin Fires at Serb Premier on House Floor". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 7, 1936. p. 2.
  11. ^ "Pact Defied; Paris Calls War Council". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 7, 1936. p. 1.
  12. ^ "Fairbanks Marries Lady Ashley in Paris". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 7, 1936. p. 1.
  13. ^ Cazorla-Sanchez, Antonio (2013). Franco: The Biography of the Myth. Routledge. p. 48. ISBN 978-1-134-44949-1.
  14. ^ "Rhineland (Military Occupation)". Hansard. March 9, 1936. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  15. ^ "German Spy Gets 4 Years in Prison in British Trial". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 10, 1936. p. 3.
  16. ^ "Paris Moves Up Army; Demands Curb on Hitler". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 10, 1936. p. 1.
  17. ^ "Many Are Killed In Spanish Riots". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 10, 1936. p. 1.
  18. ^ a b Cortada, James W., ed. (1982). Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. p. 496. ISBN 0-313-22054-9.
  19. ^ a b "7 Nations Promise to Aid France Against Germany". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 12, 1936. p. 2.
  20. ^ a b c d "Chronology 1936". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  21. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 13, 1936). "Hitler Warns Europe Anew". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  22. ^ a b "Spain Seizes 200 Fascists". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 14, 1936. p. 1.
  23. ^ Buckley, Henry (March 14, 1936). "Madrid Rioters Burn Churches; Fire on Police". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1.
  24. ^ "18 Die in Floods; Swollen Rivers Begin to Recede". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 13, 1936. p. 1.
  25. ^ "Marxist Torch Terror Spreads Through Spain". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 15, 1936. p. 7.
  26. ^ "League Jolted by Reply of Hitler". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 16, 1936. p. 1.
  27. ^ "Polo Fall Fatal to Mdivani". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 16, 1936. p. 1.
  28. ^ "Flood Engulfs Johnstown". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 18, 1936. p. 1.
  29. ^ "Litvinov Flays Hitler; Charges Nazis Plan War". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 18, 1936. p. 1.
  30. ^ "Floods Sweep On; 57 Dead". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 19, 1936. p. 1.
  31. ^ "Tageseinträge für 18. März 1936". chroniknet. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  32. ^ Darrah, David (March 19, 1936). "Germany Puts Case Up to the League Today". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  33. ^ "Floods Engulf East; 150 Die". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 20, 1936. p. 1.
  34. ^ "Roosevelt's Appeal For Red Cross Funds". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 19, 1936. p. 1.
  35. ^ "League Council Brands Reich Pact Breaker". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 19, 1936. pp. 1, 7.
  36. ^ "Polish Amendment Passed to Permit Kosher Meat". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 21, 1936. p. 8.
  37. ^ "Adds 25 Million for Flood Aid in Stricken Areas". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 22, 1936. p. 4.
  38. ^ "Ethiopian Town Laid Waste by Italian Bombs". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 23, 1936. p. 7.
  39. ^ Hanson, Patricia King, ed. (1993). The American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures Produced in the United States: Feature Films, 1931–1940. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. p. 835. ISBN 0-520-07908-6.
  40. ^ "Il Duce Seizes Big Industries, Sees War Near". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 23, 1936. p. 1.
  41. ^ "Italy Prepares for War; Seizes Industries". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. March 24, 1936.
  42. ^ Spencer, John H. (2006). Ethiopia at Bay: A Personal Account of the Haile Selassie Years. Tsehai Publishers. p. 50. ISBN 978-1-59907-000-1.
  43. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 25, 1936). "Hitler Rejects Rhine Peace Terms". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  44. ^ "1936 – Longest Game in NHL History". Library and Archives Canada. Archived from the original on June 22, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  45. ^ Stubbs, Dave (March 23, 2014). "Celebrating NHL's longest game, played March 24-25, 1936". Hockey Inside/Out. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  46. ^ Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 464. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  47. ^ "RMS Queen Mary – Build". richardcoltman.me. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  48. ^ Baer, George W. (1976). Test Case: Italy, Ethiopia, and the League of Nations. Leland Stanford Junior University. p. 244.
  49. ^ "Mexican Plane Drops; 14 Die". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 27, 1936. p. 1.
  50. ^ "Primo de Rivers Gets Two Months in Jail; Insulted Police Chief". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 29, 1936. p. 19.
  51. ^ "Hitler, Victor at Polls, Drafts New Peace Bid". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 30, 1936. p. 1.
  52. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 30, 1936). "Germans Back Up Hitler With a Record Vote". Chicago Daily Tribune: 8.
  53. ^ "Iran Angered by Press Will Shut Legation". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 31, 1936. p. 1.
  54. ^ Murphy, C.J. (April 1, 1936). "New Nazi Zep Flying Ocean; 107 on Board". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.