Manisha Malhotra

Manisha Malhotra (Hindi: मनीषा मल्होत्रा Manīṣā Maľhōtrā; born 19 September 1976) is a retired tennis player from India.

Manisha Malhotra
मनीषा मल्होत्रा
Country (sports) India
ResidenceMumbai, India
Born (1976-09-19) 19 September 1976 (age 44)
Mumbai
Turned pro1996
Retired2004
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money$52,259
Singles
Career record136–92
Career titles0 WTA, 5 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 314 (21 April 2003)
Doubles
Career record93–67
Career titles0 WTA, 7 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 149 (8 April 2002)
Olympic Games1R (2000)
Team competitions
Fed Cup17–15
Manisha Malhotra
Medal record
Asian Games
Silver medal – second place 2002 Busan Mixed Doubles

Her career high in singles is 314, achieved on 21 April 2003. In doubles, she peaked at No. 149 in the WTA rankings on 8 April 2002. In her career, Malhotra won five singles and seven doubles titles on the ITF Women's Circuit.

Playing for India at the Fed Cup, Malhotra has a win–loss record of 17–15.

CareerEdit

Malhotra represented India at the 2000 Sydney Olympics in the women's doubles tournament, partnering Nirupama Vaidyanathan but lost in the first round to Jelena Dokić and Rennae Stubbs.[citation needed]

At the 2001 PreCon Open in Switzerland, she was defeated in the first qualifying round by Maja Palaveršić. This was her first match at the WTA-level.[1]

Malhotra had her most successful year in 2002, when she was the runner-up at the Busan Asian Games and won the silver medal in the mixed doubles draw, partnering Mahesh Bhupathi.[citation needed]

Malhotra qualified for the 2003 AP Tourism Hyderabad Open, winning three matches; but lost in the first round to Tatiana Poutchek.[citation needed] This was her second and last tournament at the WTA-level.[2]

She retired from professional tennis in 2004.[citation needed] Her last singles match was a loss in the first qualifying round, against Japan's Maki Arai at an ITF $50,000 tournament in Shenzhen, China, in early December, 2003. Her last doubles matches came at the 2004 Fed Cup, where she won three of her ties (against Uzbekistan, South Korea, and Taiwan), and lost one (against Indonesia) (all partnering Sania Mirza).

She along with Sania Mirza holds the record of Longest Fed Cup tie breaks (21-19), which they achieved against Uzbekistan in 2004.[3]

ITF finalsEdit

$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments

Singles (5–4)Edit

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1. 8 August 1998 Southsea, United Kingdom Grass   Eleni Daniilidou 6–7(5–7), 3–6
Runner-up 2. 30 May 1999 El Paso, United States Hard   Sara Walker 3–6, 3–6
Winner 3. 8 August 1999 Harrisonburg, United States Hard   Michelle Dasso 6–4, 6–3
Winner 4. 26 September 1999 Sunderland, United Kingdom Hard (i)   Nicola Payne 2–6, 6–1, 6–0
Runner-up 5. 3 October 1999 Glasgow, United Kingdom Carpet (i)   Gréta Arn w/o
Winner 6. 23 July 2000 Baltimore, United States Hard   Rika Fujiwara 7–6(7–5), 6–7(4–7), 6–2
Runner-up 7. 3 September 2000 Jaipur, India Grass   Monique Adamczak 2–6, 6–2, 3–6
Winner 8. 10 September 2000 Delhi, India Hard   Veronika Raimřová 4–6, 6–1, 6–3
Winner 9. 13 April 2003 Mumbai, India Hard   Akgul Amanmuradova 2–6, 6–4, 7–6(12–10)

Doubles (7–8)Edit

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1. 30 May 1999 El Paso, United States Hard   Julie Scott   Kim Grant
  Sara Walker
6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 2. 3 October 1999 Glasgow, United Kingdom Carpet (i)   Gréta Arn   Lizzie Jelfs
  Karen Nugent
w/o
Winner 3. 20 December 1999 Lucknow, India Grass   Tong Ka-po   Maša Vesenjak
  Urška Vesenjak
6–3, 5–7, 6–1
Runner-up 4. 27 December 1999 Chandigarh, India Grass   Katarina Mišić   Maša Vesenjak
  Urška Vesenjak
3–6, 7–6(7–5), 0–6
Runner-up 5. 16 April 2000 Mumbai, India Hard   Satomi Kinjo   Rushmi Chakravarthi
  Sai Jayalakshmy Jayaram
4–6, 6–4, 1–2 ret.
Winner 6. 28 May 2000 El Paso, United States Hard   Leanne Baker   Kaysie Smashey
  Varalee Sureephong
6–2, 7–6(7–5)
Runner-up 7. 4 June 2000 San Antonio, United States Hard   Leanne Baker   Melanie Clayton
  Emma Gott
6–3, 6–7(5–7), 5–7
Winner 8. 11 June 2000 Hilton Head, United States Hard   Wendy Fix   Milagros Sequera
  Gabriela Voleková
6–4, 7–6(7–3)
Runner-up 9. 20 August 2000 London, United Kingdom Hard   Susi Bensch   Natalie Grandin
  Nicole Rencken
2–6, 7–5, 6–7(6–8)
Runner-up 10. 5 March 2001 Warrnambool, Australia Grass   Nadia Johnston   Simona Arghire
  Remi Uda
3–6, 3–6
Winner 11. 22 April 2001 Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Hard   Nirupama Vaidyanathan   Leanne Baker
  Shelley Stephens
6–3, 7–5
Winner 12. 17 June 2001 Marseille, France Clay   Leanne Baker   Caroline Dhenin
  Maja Palaveršić
7–6(7–5), 6–2
Winner 13. 1 July 2001 Båstad, Sweden Clay   Leanne Baker   Daniela Klemenschits
  Sandra Klemenschits
6–3, 6–1
Runner-up 14. 3 December 2001 Nonthaburi, Thailand Hard   Jeon Mi-ra   Ivana Abramović
  Kim Jin-hee
1–6, 5–7
Runner-up 15. 21 July 2002 Valladolid, Spain Hard   Leanne Baker   Elena Baltacha
  Natacha Randriantefy
2–6, 3–6

Other finalsEdit

Mixed doublesEdit

Outcome Date Tournament Location Partnering Opponents Score
  Silver medal 11 October 2002 2002 Asian Games Busan, South Korea   Mahesh Bhupathi   Janet Lee
  Lu Yen-hsun
6–4, 3–6, 7–9

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Basel 2001 - results
  2. ^ Hyderabad 2003 Full results
  3. ^ "The Fed Cup General Records".

External linksEdit