Manan Ahmed Asif

Manan Ahmed Asif is a historian and associate professor at Columbia University in New York City.[1] He is the founder of the South Asia blog Chapati Mystery and co-founder of Columbia's Group for Experimental Methods in Humanistic Research.

Manan Ahmed Asif
Born1971
OccupationProfessor, Historian
Known forresearch in history
Notable work
A Book of Conquest : The Chachnama and Muslim Origins in South Asia
Where the Wild Frontiers Are: Pakistan and the American Imagination

CareerEdit

Asif holds a BA from Punjab University, Lahore and a second from Miami University in Ohio. Asif earned a PhD from the University of Chicago in 2008.[2] At Chicago, Asif studied under Muzaffar Alam, Fred Donner, and Ronald Inden.[3]

Asif's work often combines archaeological, numismatic, epigraphic, and literary evidence and focuses on the history of South Asia.[4]

According to Asif, Muslim presence in the continent is not to be understood as a history of conquests or Manichean conflict (religious, military, etc). Asif, argues instead, that we recognize that presence as “lived spaces” (A Book 49), interconnected with each other across the region, and full of particularities that must be understood in their own terms.[5]

In 2014, he helped co-found Columbia's Group for Experimental Methods in Humanistic Research, which focuses on “mobilized humanities” and innovations in scholarly methodologies. One of the recent projects, Torn Apart/Separados, a series of rapidly produced data visualizations, responded to the Trump administration family separation policy announced by the United States government in 2018.[6][7] The project located 113 shelters used to house children separated from their parents at the Mexico-United States Border.[8][9]

WorksEdit

  • 2016 A Book of Conquest: The Chachnama and Muslim Origins in South Asia. Harvard University Press; ISBN 0-6746-6011-0 (10); ISBN 978-0-67466-011-3 (13).
  • 2011 Where the Wild Frontiers Are: Pakistan and the American Imagination. Just World Publications; ISBN 1-9359-8206-0 (10); ISBN 978-1-93598-206-7 (13).
  • 2020 The Loss of Hindustan. HUP/Harper Publications;ISBN 978-0-67498-790-6.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Columbia University Department of History". Columbia University. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  2. ^ "Columbia University Department of History". Columbia University. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  3. ^ "The Many Histories of Muhammad b. Qasim: Narrating the Muslim Conquest of Sindh (Order No. 3338323)". ProQuest 304406685. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  4. ^ Kumar, Anu A Misconstrued Narrative of Conquest – Manan Ahmed Asif on the 12th Century ‘Chachnama’, The Wire (thewire.in), December 24, 2016
  5. ^ Zutshi, Chitralekha (2017-12-11). "Manan Ahmed Asif. A Book of Conquest: The Chachnama and Muslim Origins in South Asif". The American Historical Review. doi:10.1093/ahr/122.5.1583. ISSN 0002-8762.
  6. ^ Dreyfuss, Emily (2018-06-25). "'ICE Is Everywhere': Using Library Science to Map the Separation Crisis". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Retrieved 2019-05-22.
  7. ^ Martinez, Norma. "Fronteras: Digitally Mapping Trump Administration's 'Zero Tolerance' Policy". www.tpr.org. Retrieved 2019-05-22.
  8. ^ "A shocking map of America's vast "immigrant detention machine"". perma.cc. Retrieved 2019-05-22.
  9. ^ Fournier, Jess. "Torn Apart: Mapping the Geography of U.S. Immigration Policy". Feministing. Retrieved 2019-05-22.