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Malcolm Colin Cameron (April 12, 1831 – September 26, 1898) was a businessman and lawyer in Ontario, Canada. He represented Huron South in the House of Commons of Canada from 1867 to 1875 and from 1878 to 1882 and Huron West from 1882 to 1887, 1891 to 1892 and 1896 to 1898.

Malcolm Colin Cameron
Malcolm Colin Cameron.jpg
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Huron South
In office
September 20, 1867 – January 22, 1874
Preceded bynone
Succeeded byThomas Greenway
In office
September 17, 1878 – June 20, 1882
Preceded byThomas Greenway
Succeeded byJohn McMillan
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Huron West
In office
June 20, 1882 – February 22, 1887
Preceded byDistrict was created in 1882
Succeeded byJames Colebrooke Patterson
In office
June 23, 1896 – May 30, 1898
Preceded byJames Colebrooke Patterson
Succeeded byRobert Holmes
7th Lieutenant Governor of the Northwest Territories
In office
May 30, 1898 – September 26, 1898
MonarchVictoria
Governor GeneralThe Earl of Aberdeen
PremierFrederick W. A. G. Haultain
Preceded byCharles Herbert Mackintosh
Succeeded byAmédée E. Forget
Personal details
Born(1831-04-12)April 12, 1831
Perth, Upper Canada
DiedSeptember 26, 1898(1898-09-26) (aged 67)
London, Ontario
NationalityCanadian
Political partyLiberal
Spouse(s)
Jessie H. McLean (m. 1856)
RelationsMalcolm Cameron, father
Children8
ResidenceGoderich, Ontario
Alma materKnox College
Occupationlawyer, businessman
Professionpolitician

He was born in Perth in Upper Canada in 1831. He was the son, probably adopted, of Malcolm Cameron. He attended Knox College in Toronto, later studying law. In 1855, he had moved to Goderich, was called to the bar in 1860, later became part of a law firm there and was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1876. Cameron joined the Goderich town council and later became mayor. In 1867, he was elected to the 1st Canadian Parliament representing Huron South.

His re-election in 1874 was overturned in 1875 but he was elected again in 1878. He defended the interests of the salt industry in the Goderich area in parliament. He took an interest in western Canada, pushing without success for representation in parliament for the Northwest Territories and denouncing the hanging of Louis Riel.

In June 1898, he was appointed Lieutenant Governor for the Northwest Territories.

He died a few months later in London, Ontario.

His son Malcolm also served as a member of the Ontario assembly and as mayor of Goderich.[1]

Euphemia township in Lambton County, Ontario was named by Cameron in honour of his mother, Euphemia McGregor.[2]

ReferencesEdit

Notes
  1. ^ Chambers, E J (1908). The Canadian Parliamentary Guide and Work of General Reference for the Dominion of Canada.
  2. ^ McCarthy, Bob (March 4, 2011). "'Voices from the Past': Samuel Smith—sentry, soldier, surveyor, settler". Lambton Shield.
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