Maarouf al-Dawalibi

Maarouf al-Dawalibi (Arabic: معروف الدواليبي‎) (March 29, 1909 – August 15, 2004),[1] was a Syrian politician and was twice the prime minister of Syria. He was born in Aleppo, and held a Ph.D. in Law. He served as a minister of economy between 1949 and 1950, and was elected speaker of the parliament in 1951. He also served as minister of defense between 1954 and 1955.[2] After the Ba'ath party came to power in 1963, he was imprisoned and later exiled, serving as an adviser to several Saudi kings, including King Khalid.[3] His son, Nofal al-Dawalibi, is involved in the Syrian Opposition.

Maarouf al-Dawalibi
Prime Minister of Syria
In office
November 28 – 29 1951
Preceded byZaki al-Khatib
Succeeded byFawzi al-Silu
In office
December 22, 1961 – March 28, 1962
Preceded byIzzat al-Nuss
Succeeded byBashir al-Azma
Speaker of the Parliament of Syria
In office
June 23 – September 30, 1951
Preceded byNazim al-Kudsi
Succeeded byRushdi al-Kikhya
Personal details
BornMarch 29, 1909
Aleppo, Syria
DiedAugust 15, 2004 (aged 95)
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Political partyPeople's Party and the Muslim Brotherhood
Alma materUniversity of Damascus, Sorbonne University

BiographyEdit

Maarouf al-Dawalibi was born in Aleppo.[4] He received his early education in Aleppo and graduated from the University of Damascus with a B.A. in Law. He did his doctoral studies at the Sorbonne University on the Roman Law.[4]

al-Dawalibi became a professor at the University of Damacus and authored al-Huqūq al-Rūmāniyah, which was later published by the university. When the university set up Faculty of the Shariah, he was appointed to teach the principles of Fiqh.[4] He authored Madkhal ilā ʻilm uṣūl al-fiqh, a book that is taught in the seminaries affiliated with the Nadwatul Ulama.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "BestFreeCams.club - Only the Best Free Live Cams".
  2. ^ "معروف الدواليبي". 11 July 2004. Archived from the original on 2004-07-11.
  3. ^ Antero Leitzinger (March 2002). "The Roots of Islamic Terrorism". The Eurasian Politician (5).
  4. ^ a b c d Nadwi, Ijteba (1973). Islam awr Huquq-e-Insani (in Urdu) (1 ed.). New Delhi: Book Service. pp. 7–8.
Preceded by Prime Minister of Syria
November 28 - 29, 1951
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of Syria
December 22, 1961 - March 28, 1962
Succeeded by