Open main menu

Maalikapurathamma

Maalikapurathamma is the goddess who is worshipped in a subsidiary shrine at Sabarimala Ayyappa Temple. Maalikapurathamma Temple is visited after having darshan of Sabarimala Ayyappa Temple.Malikappurathamma is also called Manchambika and Mancha mathavu (Mancha matha).[1][2]

Maalikapurathamma (Mahishi) is the sister of Mahishasura, who was the daughter of the sage Galvan. A student of Galvan's cursed Mahishi, turning her into a buffalo-headed demon. The demon was killed by Ayyappa, ending the curse and changing her into a beautiful woman. She wanted to marry Ayyappa, but Ayyappa was a Brahmachari. He asked her to reside near his temple in Sabarimala. Her temple in time came to be known as Maalikapurathamma Temple.

Ayyappa also told her that he would marry her when first timer (kanni Ayyappa) does not comes to sabarimala Ayappa knows all year new kanni ayappa comes to sabarimala for darshan

Contents

Malikappurathamma templeEdit

Malikapuram Temple is situated on a small hill just 100 meters away from Sabarimala. According to legend, Malikapuram temple is the place where the demon Mahishi rests in eternal wait.[3]

The temple of Malikappurath Amma, whose importance is almost in par with Lord Ayyappan, is located few yards from Sannidhanam. It is believed that the Lord Ayyapan had specific instructions that he wanted Malikappurath Amma, on his left side. Prior to the fire disaster, there was only a Peeda Prathishta (holy seat) at Malikappuram. The idol of Malikappurath Amma was installed by Brahmasree Kandararu Maheswararu Thanthri. The Devi at Malikappuram holds a Sankh, Chakram and Varada Abhya Mudra. Now the idol is covered with a gold Golaka. The temple also was reconstructed in the last decade and now the conical roof and sopanam is covered with gold.[4]

OfferingsEdit

Of the two coconuts in the "Pin Kettu" of the Irumudi kettu, One is broken at the Pampa River and another coconut is to offer to the Malikapurathamma.The turmeric powder in the Irumudi kettu is also offered to the Malikapurathamma[5]Thengai urutt (rolling of Coconut) is another major ritual which is performed in this temple.[6]Here coconuts are offered only after rolling them on the ground.[7][8]Other main offerings to Goddess Malikapurathu Amma are Saffron powder (Kumkumam podi), Manjal podi (Turmeric powder), Plantain (Kadali Pazham), Jhagri (Sharkara), red silk and Honey.[9]

Malikappuram Ezhunnelathu (Malikappuram Procession)Edit

Beginning with Makara Vilakku festival, Malikapurathamma leaves her shrine on three successive nights to inspect if the time has come for Ayyappan to fulfill his promise. A procession from the Malikapurathamma temple goes to Sharamkutti, where the first-time pilgrims leave an arrow to announce their presence. Every year, a crestfallen Malikapurathamma returns to continue her eternal wait.[10][11][12]The idol of the Devi will be carried on the back of a caparisoned elephant with traditional music including pandy melam. The same procession will return to Malikappuram in a silent manner which symbolizes the grief of Devi who sees thousands of arrows at Saramkuthy.[13]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.vaikhari.org/malikappurathamma.html
  2. ^ https://www.tripadvisor.com.sg/ShowUserReviews-g2282355-d2629115-r549223851-Malikkappuram_Devi_Temple-Sabarimala_Pathanamthitta_District_Kerala.html
  3. ^ http://sabarimala.net/malikappurathamma-temple/
  4. ^ "Malikappurathamma Malikappuram Temple Sabarimala". www.vaikhari.org. Retrieved 2016-12-02.
  5. ^ https://www.religionworld.in/sabarimala-significance-irumudi-sabarimala-pilgrimage/
  6. ^ http://www.vaikhari.org/malikappurathamma.html
  7. ^ http://sabarimala.net/malikappurathamma-temple/
  8. ^ http://www.hindudevotionalblog.com/2013/11/goddess-malikapurathamma-sabarimala.html?m=1
  9. ^ http://www.hindudevotionalblog.com/2013/11/goddess-malikapurathamma-sabarimala.html?m=1
  10. ^ https://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/art-and-culture/the-pilgrims-progress-2/
  11. ^ https://www.youthkiawaaz.com/2018/10/applying-modernity-in-sabrimala/
  12. ^ https://indianexpress.com/article/india/sabarimala-temple-women-entry-protests-faith-politics-5410790/
  13. ^ http://www.vaikhari.org/malikappurathamma.html