MSCHF (pronounced "mischief") is an American art collective based in Brooklyn, New York, United States.[1][2][3] MSCHF has produced a wide range of artworks, ranging from browser plugins to sneakers, physical products, social media channels and photographs.

HistoryEdit

The group was founded in 2016 by Gabriel Whaley, who acts as its CEO.[2][3] As of January 2020, MSCHF was reported to have received $11.5 million USD in funding.[4] The group operates as a company under the name MSCHF Product Studio, Inc.[5]

ReleasesEdit

The group announces the availability of their work in numbered "drops".[2] In May 2018 MSCHF released its first work, titled The Persistence of Chaos. The work was a single 2008 Windows laptop loaded with six malware programs.[6] The programs included were those that had purportedly caused nearly $100 billion dollars in damage to the global economy.[6][7]

A November 2019 release called Puff the Squeaky Chicken consisted of a rubber chicken that was also a functional bong.[6][8][9]

An April 2020 release called Severed Spots involved the purchase of a $30,000 USD Damien Hirst spot print. After purchasing the work, MSCHF cut the individual spots out of the print, selling them for $480 each. A second work consisting of the leftover paper, titled 88 Holes, sold for $261,400 USD.[10][11][12]

In 2020, the group released a dog collar called Cuss Collar that turns a dog's barking into spoken swear words.[13][14][15]

In June 2020 MSCHF and MrBeast released a one-time multiplayer mobile game titled "Finger on the App". In the game, players touch their phone screen and the last person to remove their finger from the screen wins $25,000.[16] Four people ended up winning $20,000 each after keeping their finger on the app for over 70 hours.[17] The game was reportedly so successful that a sequel titled "Finger on the App 2" was released in March 2021, featuring a grand prize of $100,000.[18] The winner kept their finger on the phone screen for around 51 hours; the second-place finisher also received a prize of $20,000.[19]

In September 2020 MSCHF released a series of paintings that were enlargements of medical bills received by American citizens. The paintings were sold for $78,000 USD, and the proceeds used to pay down the bills the work was built upon.[20][21]

In February 2021 the group purchased a Boston Dynamics robot dog, and mounted a paintball gun on it. The robot was used in a live performance that allowed users of the MSCHF app to control the robot and its paintball gun. After MSCHF publicly criticized the potential use of robotic dogs by police forces, Boston Dynamics released a statement criticizing the use of the robot in an artwork.[22][23][24]

Also in February 2021, MSCHF purchased four Birkin bags and used them to make sandals, dubbed Birkinstocks after the Birkenstock brand of shoes.[25] The shoes sold for between $34,000 and $76,000 USD, depending on the size of shoe purchased.[26][27]

In March 2021 the group released Axe No 5, a mashup of Axe Body Spray and Chanel No. 5 perfume.[28][29][30]

Also, on March 29, 2021, MSCHF partnered with Lil Nas X, to release a pair of modified Nike Air Max 97 shoes called Satan Shoes, in an edition of 666.[31] The shoes sold for $1,018 USD, in an apparent reference to Bible verse Luke 10:18.[32] They featured a bronze pentagram, an inverted cross and a drop of real human blood in their sole and sold out in the first minutes of being available for sale.[33] The shoes garnered significant controversy, which led Nike to announce that they were suing MSCHF for trademark infringement and dilution.[34] In Nike's complaint against MSCHF and Lil Nas X, the brand argued that it had "suffered harm to its goodwill, including among consumers who believe that Nike is endorsing satanism."[35] The two companies came to a settlement in April 2021 after a U.S. District Court in Brooklyn granted Nike a temporary restraining order against MSCHF. As part of the settlement, MSCHF agreed to accept returns of the Satan Shoes.[36]

In July 2021, MSCHF released Dead Startup Toys.[37] The drop included miniature "toy" versions of the Juicero juicer, the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) rugged laptop, Theranos miniLab, Jibo social robot, and the Coolest Cooler.

In October 2021 the collective offered the original Andy Warhol drawing "Fairies", which they had purchased for $20,000, along with 999 high-quality forgeries they produced, for $250 apiece. Having mixed the fakes with the lone original, MSCHF claimed not to know which was the real Warhol. Each of the forgeries and also the lone original were (re)titled "Possibly Real Copy of 'Fairies' by Andy Warhol".[38]

In December 2021, they released Tontine, a morbid sort of betting pool loosely based on the 17th century investment scheme of the same name. Participants enter $10 dollars into the pot and then must log in every day lest they be eliminated. The last person remaining gets the pot. [39]

In January 2022, MSCHF released OnlyBags. The drop consisted of a website where users could browse and purchase shopping bags from luxury brands. All bags sold out in under a minute.[40]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Turner, Nick; Schneider, Joe (April 9, 2021). "Nike Settles Suit Over Lil Nas X's 'Satan Shoes' That Had Human Blood". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on April 12, 2021. Retrieved April 12, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c Leskin, Paige. "A company that runs on 'structured chaos' is going viral and selling out products in minutes, from Jesus shoes to toaster-shaped bath bombs". Business Insider.
  3. ^ a b Pietsch, Bryan (28 March 2021). "Nike Sues Over Unauthorized 'Satan Shoes'". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 28 March 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  4. ^ "Lil Nas X's 'Satan Shoe' - made with one drop of human blood - sold out in under a minute, bringing in nearly $700,000". news.yahoo.com. Archived from the original on 2021-04-26. Retrieved 2021-03-31.
  5. ^ Cullins, Ashley (March 29, 2021). "Nike Sues MSCHF Over Lil Nas X Satan Shoes". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 31, 2021. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  6. ^ a b c Stephen, Bijan (27 July 2020). "How MSCHF built a business out of squeaky chicken bongs". The Verge. Archived from the original on 30 March 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  7. ^ "A Laptop Infected With the World's Most Dangerous Computer Viruses Is Up for Auction. The Bid Is Now More Than $1.2 Million". Artnet News. 22 May 2019. Archived from the original on 14 March 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  8. ^ "puff the rubber chicken bong that squeaks when you smoke it". designboom | architecture & design magazine. 27 November 2019. Archived from the original on 8 April 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  9. ^ "The Puff Rubber Chicken Bong Squeaks When You Smoke It | Cool Material". coolmaterial.com. 2 December 2019. Archived from the original on 8 April 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  10. ^ "When an Art Collective Cut Up a $30,000 Damien Hirst Spot Print, the Spots Sold Out. Now the Empty Paper Just Sold for $261,000". Artnet News. 6 May 2020. Archived from the original on 31 March 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  11. ^ Holland, Oscar. "A $30K Damien Hirst was cut up -- and the pieces are selling for seven times as much". CNN. Archived from the original on 2021-04-08. Retrieved 2021-03-31.
  12. ^ "How to Make Money Destroying the Work of Damien Hirst". Interview Magazine. 1 May 2020. Archived from the original on 8 April 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  13. ^ "Bad Dog! This Collar Translates All of Your Dog's Barks Into Curse Words". PEOPLE.com. Archived from the original on 2021-04-08. Retrieved 2021-03-30.
  14. ^ "You can now buy a dog collar that will swear every time your dog barks". fox43.com. Archived from the original on 2020-02-19. Retrieved 2021-03-30.
  15. ^ Alicia Lee. "You can now buy a dog collar that will swear every time your dog barks". CNN. Archived from the original on 2021-02-26. Retrieved 2021-03-30.
  16. ^ Beresford, Trilby (June 30, 2020). "YouTuber MrBeast Launches Multiplayer Endurance Game 'Finger on the App'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on May 5, 2021. Retrieved May 5, 2021.
  17. ^ Alexander, Julia (July 3, 2020). "MrBeast ends Finger on the App competition by telling players to stop after 70 hours". The Verge. Archived from the original on March 18, 2021. Retrieved May 5, 2021.
  18. ^ Spangler, Todd (March 19, 2021). "MrBeast's $100,000 'Finger on the App 2' Contest Kicks Off Saturday". Variety. Archived from the original on May 5, 2021. Retrieved May 5, 2021.
  19. ^ "MrBeast Crowns $100,000 'Finger on the App' Winner After 50-Hour Contest". Tubefilter.com. March 23, 2021. Archived from the original on May 5, 2021. Retrieved May 5, 2021.
  20. ^ Holland, Oscar. "Oversized hospital bill paintings sold to pay off medical debts". CNN. Archived from the original on 2021-03-29. Retrieved 2021-03-31.
  21. ^ "An Art Collective Turned Three Americans' Medical Bills Into Paintings and Then Sold Them to Erase $73,000 Worth of Debt". Artnet News. 28 September 2020. Archived from the original on 14 March 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  22. ^ Stephen, Bijan (22 February 2021). "MSCHF's latest drop lets you control a Boston Dynamics robot with a paintball gun on its back". The Verge. Archived from the original on 18 April 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  23. ^ "Boston Dynamics condemns art group's 'provocative use' of doglike robot | Boston.com". www.boston.com. Archived from the original on 2021-04-09. Retrieved 2021-03-31.
  24. ^ "Boston Dynamics' Robot Dog Is Now Armed—in the Name of Art". Wired. Archived from the original on 2021-03-10. Retrieved 2021-03-31.
  25. ^ Doaln, Leah. "Irreverent or insane? A $76K sandal cut from real Birkin bags". CNN. Archived from the original on 2021-04-09. Retrieved 2021-03-31.
  26. ^ Friedman, Vanessa (8 February 2021). "$76,000 Birkinstocks Made From Actual Birkin Bags?". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 30 March 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  27. ^ Holliday, Kayla. "Why You Keep Seeing That $76,000 Birkenstock-Birkin Bag Mash-Up in the Gossip Pages". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on 2021-03-02. Retrieved 2021-03-31.
  28. ^ Wynne, Kelly (8 March 2021). "Axe body spray meets Chanel No. 5 in questionable fragrance release". Newsweek. Archived from the original on 31 March 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  29. ^ "MSCHF Releases World's Most Expensive Axe Body Spray". HYPEBEAST. 9 March 2021. Archived from the original on 8 April 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  30. ^ Sawyer, Jonathan (10 March 2021). "A Closer Look at the Chanel x Axe "Collab" That Nobody Asked For". Highsnobiety.
  31. ^ "'Satan Shoes' are just the latest stunt for off-kilter company MSCHF". NBC News. Archived from the original on 2021-03-30. Retrieved 2021-03-30.
  32. ^ "Team who created rapper's 'Satan Shoes' put own blood samples inside shoes". www.msn.com. Archived from the original on 2021-03-30. Retrieved 2021-03-31.
  33. ^ Holland, Oscar; Palumbo, Jacqui. "Lil Nas X's unofficial 'Satan' Nikes containing human blood sell out in under a minute". CNN. Archived from the original on 2021-03-31. Retrieved 2021-03-30.
  34. ^ Hernandez, Victoria (29 March 2021). "Nike sues novelty company MSCHF over Lil Nas X's 'Satan Shoes' collab". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 2021-03-30. Retrieved 2021-03-30.
  35. ^ Complaint ("Comp.") at 42, Nike v. MSCHF Product Studio, INC., No. 21-cv-1679
  36. ^ Vigdor, Neil (April 8, 2021). "Company Will Offer Refunds to Buyers of 'Satan Shoes' to Settle Lawsuit by Nike". New York Times.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  37. ^ Porter, Jon (2021-07-12). "Five "Dead Startups" from Juicero to Coolest Cooler parodied as toys". The Verge. Archived from the original on 2021-07-12. Retrieved 2021-07-12.
  38. ^ Holland, O., "1,000 Warhol artworks are on sale for just $250 each. But only one is real", CNN, October 26, 2021.
  39. ^ "MSCHF Turns Taboo Investment Scheme Into a Chance to Win Cash With Online Game Tontine". adweek. 2021-12-23. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  40. ^ "MSCHF Is Selling Designer Bags for $40". Highsnobiety. 2022-01-10. Retrieved 2022-01-12.

External linksEdit