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The M29 is an American-produced 81 millimeter mortar. It began replacing the M1 mortar in U.S. service in 1952 being lighter and with greater range. It was subsequently replaced by the M252 mortar in 1987. Variants included the M29E1 and M29A1, adopted in 1964. These were produced with a hard chrome-plated bore to prolong barrel life and ease of cleaning.

US M29 81 mm Mortar
Mortar M29.jpg
TypeInfantry mortar
Place of originUnited States
Service history
In service1952–present
Used bySee Users
WarsKorean War
Vietnam War
Laotian Civil War
Cambodian Civil War
Lebanese Civil War
Salvadoran Civil War
Specifications
Mass23.4 kilograms (52 lb) (M5 mount) 9.3 kilograms (21 lb) (M1 mount)

Feed systemmanual

The maximum rate of fire is 30 rounds for the first minute followed by 4 to 12 rounds per additional minute. The range is 5,140 yards. The weapon was usually serviced by a crew of five. The normal crew consisted of a squad leader, a gunner, an assistant gunner and two ammunition handlers.

Contents

Combat useEdit

The M29 mortar has been used by many countries in many wars.

PhilippinesEdit

The M29 mortar is used by the Philippine army and the Americans as well. the Philippine army or (PA) used M29 mortars against terrorist in Mindanao.[citation needed] They used recently the M29 mortar in the all-out offensive against (BIFF) or Bangsamoro Islamic freedom fighters. the citizens of Mindanao called them the "MON DRAGON". The all-out offensive against the BIFF is launched February 24, 2015 to lessen the forces of the BIFF and in order also to kill Basit Usman. There are 400 units of M29 mortar in the Philippines.[citation needed]

UsersEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Gander, Terry J.; Cutshaw, Charles Q. (4 June 2001). "81 mm M29 and M29A1 mortar". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2002-2003. pp. 5330–5333.
  2. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Bolivia". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 949.
  3. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Brazil". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 1031.
  4. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Chile". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 1221.
  5. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Cyprus". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 1509.
  6. ^ a b c Wiener, Friedrich (1987). The armies of the NATO nations: Organization, concept of war, weapons and equipment. Truppendienst Handbooks Volume 3. Vienna: Herold Publishers. p. 469.
  7. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Ecuador". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 1602.
  8. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Ethiopia". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 1645.
  9. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Fiji". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 1646.
  10. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Greece". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 2344.
  11. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Indonesia". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 2476.
  12. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Iran". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 2548.
  13. ^ "Japanese mortars". Jane's Infantry Weapons 1994-1995. 27 April 1994. p. 3013.
  14. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Jordan". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 3014.
  15. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "South Korean Army mortars". Jane's Infantry Weapons 1994-1995. pp. 3081–3082.
  16. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Lebanon". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 3087.
  17. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Liberia". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 3089.
  18. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Luxembourg". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 3091.
  19. ^ Maung, Aung Myoe (2009). Building the Tatmadaw: Myanmar Armed Forces Since 1948 (PDF). p. 107. ISBN 978-981-230-848-1.
  20. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Myanmar (Burma)". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 3112.
  21. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Nepal". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 3113.
  22. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Nigeria". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 3136.
  23. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Panama". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 3238.
  24. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Philippines". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 3269.
  25. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Saudi Arabia". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 3850.
  26. ^ Rottman, Gordon L. (1993). Armies of the Gulf War. Elite 45. Osprey Publishing. p. 30. ISBN 9781855322776.
  27. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Suriname". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 4275.
  28. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Taiwan". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 4552.
  29. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Tunisia". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 4572.
  30. ^ Rottman, Gordon L. (2010). Army of the Republic of Vietnam 1955–75. Men at Arms 458. Osprey Publishing. p. 9. ISBN 9781849081818.
  31. ^ Rottman, Gordon L. (10 Feb 2009). North Vietnamese Army Soldier 1958–75. Warrior 135. Osprey Publishing. p. 32. ISBN 9781846033711.
  32. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Vietnam". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 5799.
  33. ^ Gander, Terry J. (22 November 2000). "National inventories, Yemen". Jane's Infantry Weapons 2001-2002. p. 5802.

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