M-227 (Michigan highway)

M-227 is a 6.834-mile (10.998 km) north–south state trunkline highway in the U.S. state of Michigan. It consists largely of a segment of old U.S. Highway 27 (US 27) along the south and west sides of Marshall. The highway passes the airport and serves an industrial section of town north of the Kalamazoo River. M-227 was created as a part of a program to add additional routes into the state's highway system under the leadership of Governor John Engler.

M-227 marker
M-227
M-227 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by MDOT
Length6.834 mi[1] (10.998 km)
ExistedOctober 1, 1998[2]–present
Major junctions
South end I-69 south of Marshall
North end BL I-94 in Marshall
Location
CountiesCalhoun
Highway system
US 223 M-231

Route descriptionEdit

M-227 starts at a diamond interchange with Interstate 69 (I-69) at exit 32 between Tekonsha and Marshall. From I-69, M-227 runs east on F Drive South north of Pine and Long lakes for approximately one mile (1.6 km). The highway runs through agricultural land and turns north to follow Old US 27/17 Mile Road. At Division Drive, M-227 passes into Marshall on Kalamazoo Avenue. The highway runs past the Brooks Field airport and the Alwin Downs Golf Course. Kalamazoo Avenue crosses the Kalamazoo River, and M-227 turns west along Industrial Road. This section of town is an industrial park, and M-227 curves north onto West Drive,[3][4] crossing the Norfolk Southern Railroad.[5] The northern terminus is BL I-94 (Michigan Avenue) on the west side of Marshall, near I-69.[3] It lies only within Calhoun County and is entirely an undivided surface route.[4]

Like other state highways in Michigan, M-227 is maintained by the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT). In 2011, the department's traffic surveys showed that on average, 8.408 vehicles used the highway daily in Marshall south of Industrial Dive and 1,862 vehicles did so each day along F Drive, the highest and lowest counts along the highway, respectively.[6] No section of M-227 is listed on the National Highway System,[7] a network of roads important to the country's economy, defense, and mobility.[8]

HistoryEdit

Before the completion of I-69 near Marshall in late 1967, US 27 followed 17 Mile Road and Kalamazoo Avenue into Marshall. That routing was turned back to local control after the completion of I-69 to I-94.[9][10] M-227 came into existence nearly 35 years after the completion of I-69 in southern Michigan and, except for the section of old US 27, was long a collection of unnumbered local surface roads. It was designated as a part of Governor John Engler's Rationalization program on October 1, 1998 and first signed in 2001.[2][11]

Major intersectionsEdit

The entire highway is in Calhoun County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Fredonia Township0.0000.000  I-69 – Coldwater, LansingExit 32 on I-69
Marshall6.83410.998  BL I-94 (Michigan Avenue)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation & Michigan Center for Shared Solutions and Technology Partnerships (2009). MDOT Physical Reference Finder Application (Map). Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  2. ^ a b Truscott, John (September 24, 1998). "MDOT Accepts Responsibility for 120 Miles of Local Roads" (Press release). Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on March 15, 2007. Retrieved August 26, 2008.
  3. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (2010). Uniquely Michigan: Official Department of Transportation Map (Map). c. 1:975,000. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § M10. OCLC 42778335, 639960603.
  4. ^ a b Google (September 29, 2010). "Overview Map of M-227" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved September 29, 2010.
  5. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (April 2009). Michigan's Railroad System (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved September 14, 2010.
  6. ^ Bureau of Transportation Planning (2008). "Traffic Monitoring Information System". Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 30, 2012.
  7. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (April 23, 2006). National Highway System, Michigan (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 21, 2012. Retrieved October 7, 2008.
  8. ^ Natzke, Stefan; Neathery, Mike & Adderly, Kevin (June 20, 2012). "What is the National Highway System?". National Highway System. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved July 1, 2012.
  9. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1967). Michigan Water-Winter Wonderland: Official Highway Map (Map). [c. 1:918,720]. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § M10. OCLC 12701120. Retrieved October 17, 2019 – via Michigan History Center.
  10. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1968). Official Highway Map (Map). [c. 1:918,720]. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § M10. OCLC 12701120. Retrieved October 17, 2019 – via Michigan History Center.
  11. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2001). Michigan, Great Lakes Great Times: Official Department of Transportation Map (Map). c. 1:918,720. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § M10. OCLC 42778335. Retrieved October 17, 2019 – via Michigan History Center.

External linksEdit

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata
  • M-227 at Michigan Highways
  • M-227 at CanHighways.com