Lytton Mausoleum

The Lytton Mausoleum is a family mausoleum in Knebworth Park, Hertfordshire, England.

Mausoleum at Knebworth House Herts - geograph.org.uk - 476189.jpg
The mausoleum in 2007
General information
Architectural styleNeoclassical
CountryEngland
Listed Building – Grade II
Official nameLytton Mausoleum in Knebworth Park, including railings
Designated1968
Reference no.1174579[1]
ClientElizabeth Bulwer-Lytton
Technical details
Structural systemstone
Design and construction
ArchitectJohn Buonarotti Papworth

DescriptionEdit

The mausoleum was commissioned by Elizabeth Bulwer-Lytton (née Warburton-Lytton) and built in 1817 in memory of her parents Richard Warburton-Lytton (1745–1810) and Elizabeth (née Jodrell) of Knebworth House. It is set in parkland at a distance from the Church of St Mary and St Thomas, a Grade I listed building.

Until the construction of the mausoleum, the Lytton family of Knebworth House used the Lytton Chapel, attached to the north side of St Mary's church, for interments. This chapel was rebuilt around 1710 to house three exceptionally fine monuments dedicated to members of the family.[2]

BurialsEdit

Inside the mausoleum are a number of coffins,[3] including that of Elizabeth Bulwer-Lytton (1770–1843). A casket holds the ashes of Lady Constance Bulwer-Lytton (1869–1923). She joined the suffragette movement,[4] and, as her epitaph states “sacrificed her health and talents in helping to bring victory to this cause”.[2]

Architecture and conservationEdit

The architect of the octagonal, stone building was John Buonarotti Papworth. His design is neoclassical. The roof supports a sarcophagus with shell acroteria.[1][5]

The building and the railings which enclose it were Grade II listed in 1968.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Lytton Mausoleum in Knebworth Park, including railings". Historic England.
  2. ^ a b "Lytton Mausoleum". Mausolea and Monuments Trust.
  3. ^ "Tragic story of Victorian novelist's distraught daughter". Telegraph. March 2017.
  4. ^ "An aristocratic freedom fighter". Hertfordshire Life (www.hertfordshirelife.co.uk). November 2014. Retrieved 13 March 2019.
  5. ^ "Design for a sarcophagus". Retrieved 14 March 2019.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 51°52′31″N 0°12′44″W / 51.87521°N 0.21229°W / 51.87521; -0.21229