Luigi Delneri

Luigi "Gigi" Delneri (born 23 August 1950), often incorrectly written as Del Neri,[1] is an Italian football manager and a former player.

Luigi Delneri
Luigi Del Neri.jpg
Delneri as Atalanta manager in 2007
Personal information
Full name Luigi Delneri
Date of birth (1950-08-23) 23 August 1950 (age 70)
Place of birth Aquileia, Italy
Playing position(s) Midfielder
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1967–1968 Aquileia
1968–1972 SPAL 66 (0)
1972–1974 Foggia 51 (5)
1974–1975 Novara 33 (1)
1975–1978 Foggia 92 (6)
1978–1980 Udinese 59 (7)
1980–1981 Sampdoria 33 (1)
1981–1982 Vicenza 31 (4)
1982–1983 Siena 24 (1)
1983–1984 Pro Gorizia 32 (8)
1984–1985 Opitergina
Teams managed
1985–1986 Opitergina
1986–1989 Pro Gorizia
1989–1990 Partinicaudace
1990–1991 Teramo
1991–1992 Ravenna
1992–1994 Novara
1994–1996 Nocerina
1996–1998 Ternana
1998 Empoli
1998–1999 Ternana
2000–2004 Chievo
2004 Porto
2004–2005 Roma
2005–2006 Palermo
2006–2007 Chievo
2007–2009 Atalanta
2009–2010 Sampdoria
2010–2011 Juventus
2012–2013 Genoa
2015–2016 Hellas Verona
2016–2017 Udinese
2020 Brescia
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

After a playing career as a midfielder including for several Serie A clubs, he began managing in the lower leagues, and took Ternana to consecutive promotions into Serie B. He then spent four years at Chievo, helping the Verona neighbourhood club into Serie A for the first time and 5th place and UEFA Cup qualification in their first season at the top.

Delneri left Chievo in 2004 for UEFA Champions League holders Porto, but was dismissed within weeks and before a competitive game. He subsequently managed several Serie A clubs in the following years, including one season with Juventus after taking Sampdoria to fourth place in 2010.

Playing careerEdit

Born at Aquileia, Udine, Delneri made his professional debut as player at the age of 16 for SPAL, Ferrara's football team, for which he had worked as storer. After playing for Foggia and Novara, he moved to Udinese, with whom he gained promotion to Serie A, Italy's top division. He was later traded to Sampdoria and then to Vicenza, Siena, Pro Gorizia and Opitergina, an amateur team from Oderzo, where he ended his playing career at 34.

Coaching careerEdit

Early career / ChievoEdit

After his retirement as a player, Delneri stayed at Oderzo, appointed by chairman Ettore Setten (now owner of Treviso) as head coach. In 1986, he signed for Serie D team Pro Gorizia. He then coached Partinicaudace, a minor Sicilian Serie D team, in 1989, Teramo, Ravenna, Novara and Nocerina of Serie C2; with this last team he won the league and promotion to Serie C1. He then moved to Ternana of Serie C2, guiding it to Serie B after two consecutive promotions.

In 1998, after his second consecutive promotion, Delneri was signed by Serie A's Empoli, but was fired before starting the championship and was subsequently recalled by his former team Ternana in Serie B.

In 2000, Delneri signed with Chievo of Serie B, a team representing a small quarter of the city of Verona. It was the beginning of the so-called "Chievo miracle" in which the team was promoted for the very first time to Serie A, where they topped the league for the first half of the season and then qualified for the UEFA Cup by coming 5th.[2]

Porto, Roma and PalermoEdit

In June 2004, Delneri signed a three-year contract to succeed José Mourinho at UEFA Champions League holders Porto.[3] He was sacked on 7 August, without even managing a competitive game, allegedly for missing training sessions.[4]

Delneri became Roma's third manager of the season in October 2004, after Cesare Prandelli and Rudi Völler. His team failed to advance from their Champions League group, and he dropped young forward Antonio Cassano after a dispute.[5] He resigned from his two-year contract in March 2005, with the team in 7th, and handed the job over to Bruno Conti.[6]

In June 2005, Delneri signed for Palermo, succeeding Francesco Guidolin who had quit for new challenges after qualifying them for the 2005–06 UEFA Cup.[7] He was fired on 28 January 2006 with the team in 10th after a 3–1 home loss to Siena, having taken them into the knockout stages of the UEFA Cup.[8]

Chievo return, Atalanta and SampdoriaEdit

 
Delneri as Sampdoria manager in 2009

On 16 October 2006, Delneri returned to coach Chievo, replacing Giuseppe Pillon at the 15th-place club.[9] Despite a strong start, he did not manage to save his side from relegation, losing a spot in the following season's Serie A with a 2–0 loss to Catania on the final matchday.[10]

Following the relegation, Delneri was announced as new Atalanta boss in June 2007.[11] He led the team from Bergamo to 9th and 11th place in his two seasons; he announced in April 2009 that he would leave at the end of the season.[12]

Delneri left to take over at Sampdoria on 1 June 2009, a team that had just finished 13th. He guided Sampdoria to a surprising fourth-place finish, and a spot to the third qualifying round of the 2010–11 UEFA Champions League, leaving the next day.[13]

JuventusEdit

On 19 May 2010, two days after leaving Sampdoria, Delneri was appointed as coach of Juventus.[14] At the end of the 2010–11 season, having finished 7th and not qualified for Europe, Delneri was sacked by the Juventus board of directors.[15]

Later careerEdit

On 22 October 2012, Delneri was named new head coach of tenth-place Genoa in Serie A, succeeding sacked coach Luigi De Canio at Sampdoria's rivals.[16] On 20 January 2013, however, Delneri was himself sacked following a 0–2 home loss to Catania and a string of bad results for the team, which recorded only two wins in his 13 matches with the club.[17]

Delneri was hired at another of his former club's rivals, this time Chievo's adversaries Hellas Verona, replacing Andrea Mandorlini on 1 December 2015; the team had not won once all season.[18] He left by mutual consent after the season ended in relegation for the club on 23 May 2016.[19]

On 3 October 2016, Delneri signed a one-year deal with the option of a second at Udinese, succeeding Giuseppe Iachini who had won two of seven games.[20] He finished the campaign in 13th, earning a second year, but took 12 points from the first 12 games and lost his job on 21 November 2017 when three points above the relegation places.[21]

On 4 September 2020, Delneri was officially appointed manager of Brescia, following their relegation to Serie B.[22] On 6 October 2020, after one draw and one loss, positioned in last place, Delneri was sacked.[23]

Style of managementEdit

As a manager, Delneri is known for using a spectacular, offensive-minded style of football, which is heavily influenced by Arrigo Sacchi's tactics at Milan, as well as Dutch total football. His teams are known for their work-rate, strength, heavy running, and aggressive use of pressing when defending off the ball, while they are known for their movement off the ball, ability to change positions, and make overlapping runs when attacking.[24] A tactically intelligent manager, his preferred formation is the 4–4–2, which relies on a high defensive line, although he has also been known to adopt other systems which better suit the characteristics of his players, including the 4–3–3.[25][26]

Managerial statisticsEdit

As of 19 November 2017[27][28][29][30][31][32][33][34]
Managerial record by team and tenure
Team From To Record
G W D L Win %
Teramo 1 July 1990 1 July 1991 40 16 16 8 040.00
Ravenna 1 July 1991 1 July 1992 46 21 19 6 045.65
Novara 1 July 1992 1 July 1994 78 30 33 15 038.46
Nocerina 24 October 1994 1 July 1996 68 31 26 11 045.59
Ternana 1 July 1996 1 July 1998 83 43 29 11 051.81
Empoli 1 July 1998 1 September 1998 0 0 0 0 !
Ternana 6 November 1998 25 January 1999 9 0 5 4 000.00
Chievo 1 July 2000 4 June 2004 154 65 48 41 042.21
Porto 4 June 2004 7 August 2004 0 0 0 0 !
Roma 29 September 2004 13 March 2005 31 11 8 12 035.48
Palermo 1 July 2005 29 January 2006 31 11 11 9 035.48
Chievo 16 October 2006 30 June 2007 36 9 13 14 025.00
Atalanta 1 July 2007 30 June 2009 79 26 20 33 032.91
Sampdoria 1 June 2009 17 May 2010 40 20 10 10 050.00
Juventus 19 May 2010 23 May 2011 50 20 19 11 040.00
Genoa 22 October 2012 20 January 2013 13 2 2 9 015.38
Hellas Verona 1 December 2015 23 May 2016 26 6 7 13 023.08
Udinese 4 October 2016 21 November 2017 44 15 8 21 034.09
Brescia 4 September 2020 Present 0 0 0 0 !
Total 828 326 274 228 039.37

HonoursEdit

CoachEdit

Individual

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Per favore, chiamatelo Gino Delneri". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). 19 January 2003. Retrieved 14 May 2012.
  2. ^ Whelan, Padraig (30 April 2012). "Chievo Verona: A Modern Day Miracle". Forza Italian Football. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  3. ^ "Del Neri to coach Porto". Eurosport. 4 June 2004. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  4. ^ "Porto dump coach Del Neri". BBC Sport. 7 August 2004. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  5. ^ Evans, Simon (5 November 2004). "Totti can only look on as Roma fail again". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  6. ^ "Del Neri hands over Roma reins". UEFA. 14 March 2005. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  7. ^ "Del Neri to push Palermo on". UEFA. 31 May 2005. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  8. ^ "Palermo give Del Neri the push". UEFA. 28 January 2006. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  9. ^ "Del Neri returns to Chievo". UEFA. 16 October 2006. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  10. ^ "Chievo, è stata una favola". La Gazzetta dello Sport (in Italian). 28 May 2017. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  11. ^ "Atalanta, ecco Del Neri" (in Italian). 9 June 2007. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  12. ^ "Del Neri to leave Atalanta in summer". FourFourTwo. 20 April 2009. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  13. ^ "Luigi Del Neri leaves Sampdoria as Juventus rumours grow". The Guardian. 17 May 2010. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  14. ^ "Juventus confirm Delneri appointment". ESPN soccernet. 19 May 2010. Retrieved 25 June 2010.
  15. ^ "Juventus part company with coach Luigi Del Neri". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. 21 May 2011. Retrieved 14 May 2012.
  16. ^ McCauley, Kim (22 October 2012). "Genoa sack Luigi De Canio, replace him with Luigi Delneri". SB Nation. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  17. ^ "Ballardini succeeds Delneri at Genoa". UEFA. 21 January 2013. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  18. ^ "Official: Del Neri in at Verona". Football Italia. 1 December 2015. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  19. ^ "Confirmed: Del Neri leaves Verona". 23 May 2006. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  20. ^ "Luigi Delneri Handed Udinese Hotseat". Be In Sports. 3 October 2016. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  21. ^ "Del Neri sacked by Udinese". FourFourTwo. 21 November 2017. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  22. ^ "Luigi Delneri è il nuovo tecnico della Prima Squadra" (in Italian). Brescia Calcio. 4 September 2020. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  23. ^ "Official: Brescia sack Delneri, recall Lopez". Football Italia. 6 October 2020.
  24. ^ Vernazza, Sebastiano (15 April 2019). "Chievo, ciao Serie A. La nostra Top Undici gialloblù" [Chievo, bye Serie A. Our Top gialloblù eleven] (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. Retrieved 15 April 2019.
  25. ^ Turcato, Enrico (18 October 2010). "L'allenatore cambia: da 4–4–2 a 4–3–3" [The coach changes: from 4–4–2 to 4–3–3] (in Italian). www.sportmediaset.mediaset.it. Retrieved 15 April 2019.
  26. ^ "Barzagli: More fun with Allegri". Football Italia. 14 June 2019. Retrieved 19 June 2019.
  27. ^ "Luigi Delneri's managerial career". Soccerbase. Racing Post. Retrieved 14 May 2012.
  28. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tablesi/ital05.html
  29. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tablesi/italcup05.html
  30. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tablesi/ital06.html
  31. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 7 February 2016. Retrieved 7 January 2016.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  32. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tablesi/italcup07.html
  33. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tablesi/italcup08.html
  34. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tablesi/italcup09.html
  35. ^ "Albo d'Oro" (in Italian). assocalciatori.it. Archived from the original on 15 May 2013. Retrieved 25 April 2016.
  36. ^ "Albo "Panchina d'Oro"" (in Italian). Alleniamo.com. Archived from the original on 7 July 2011. Retrieved 25 April 2016.

External linksEdit