Lu Liang-Huan

Lu Liang-Huan (Chinese: 呂良煥, born 10 December 1936), also known as Mister Lu (Mr Lu) to British golf fans, was a successful Taiwanese golfer who won several important tournaments on the Asian and European circuits between 1959 and 1987.

Lu Liang-Huan
呂良煥
Personal information
NicknameMr. Lu
Born (1936-12-10) 10 December 1936 (age 83)
Taipei, Japanese-ruled Taiwan
Height1.72 m (5 ft 8 in)
Weight65 kg (143 lb; 10.2 st)
Nationality Taiwan
Career
StatusProfessional
Former tour(s)Japan Golf Tour
Asia Golf Circuit
Professional wins23
Number of wins by tour
Japan Golf Tour8
Other15
Best results in major championships
Masters Tournament37th: 1972
PGA ChampionshipDNP
U.S. OpenDNP
The Open Championship2nd: 1971
Achievements and awards
Asia Golf Circuit
champion
1966, 1967
Lu Liang-Huan
Traditional Chinese呂良煥
Simplified Chinese吕良焕

Lu was born in Taipei. He became the first winner of the Hong Kong Open in 1959, the tournament devised by former Australian Open champion Eric Cremin and featuring, among others, Bob Charles and Kel Nagle. He would become a regular winner on the Far East Circuit, later known as the Asia Golf Circuit, winning his own country's national Open on four occasions and the overall circuit title in 1966 and 1967.[1][2] He also played on the Japan Golf Tour, winning nine times between 1971 and 1987.

His finest year was 1971, when he finished runner-up to Lee Trevino in The Open at Royal Birkdale, then the following week won the French Open at Biarritz. He also won in Thailand and Japan that season. In 1972, he and countryman Hsieh Min-Nan teamed up to win the World Cup at Royal Melbourne Golf Club, Taiwan's sole victory in the event.[3]

Lu's nephew, Lu Hsi-chuen, also had a successful career as a professional golfer.[4]

Professional wins (23)Edit

Japan Golf Tour wins (8)Edit

No. Date Tournament Winning score Margin of
victory
Runner(s)-up
1 3 Jun 1973 World Friendship −12 (69-73-65-69=276) Playoff   Isao Aoki,   Graham Marsh
2 21 Apr 1974 Sobu International Open −8 (71-71-68-70=280) 4 strokes   Fumio Tanaka,   Masashi Ozaki
3 1 Sep 1974 Hiroshima Open −16 (68-68-67-69=272) 1 stroke   Takashi Murakami
4 11 May 1975 Fujisankei Classic −8 (71-71-68-70=280) 4 strokes   Graham Marsh
5 31 Aug 1975 Hiroshima Open (2) −13 (66-65-72-72=275) Playoff   Tōru Nakamura,   Kosaku Shimada
6 26 Jun 1977 Shizuoka Open −5 (68-71-72-70=283) Playoff   Yasuhiro Miyamoto
7 21 Aug 1983 Acom Doubles
(with   Lu Hsi-chuen)
−27 (64-66-66-65=261)
8 22 Mar 1987 Shizuoka Open (2) −8 (71-74-69-66=280) 2 strokes   Nobumitsu Yuhara

Japan Golf Tour playoff record (3–1)

No. Year Tournament Opponent(s) Result
1 1973 World Friendship   Isao Aoki,   Graham Marsh Won with birdie on first extra hole
2 1975 Hiroshima Open   Tōru Nakamura,   Kosaku Shimada Won two-hole aggregate playoff;
Lu: E (3-4=7),
Nakamura: +2 (5-4=9),
Shimada: +2 (4-5=9)
3 1976 Fujisankei Classic   Norio Suzuki Lost to par on fifth extra hole
4 1977 Shizuoka Open   Yasuhiro Miyamoto

Japanese circuit wins (2)Edit

Asia Golf Circuit wins (9)Edit

Other Asian wins (1)Edit

European circuit win (1)Edit

Other wins (2)Edit

Results in major championshipsEdit

Tournament 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975
Masters Tournament CUT 37 T43 T43
The Open Championship T24 2 T40 T5 T53

Note: Lu only played in the Masters Tournament and The Open Championship.

  Top 10
  Did not play

CUT = missed the half-way cut
"T" indicates a tie for a place

Team appearancesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Boyle triumphs in the Yomiuri". The Straits Times. Singapore. 11 April 1966. p. 19. Retrieved 19 February 2020 – via National Library Board.
  2. ^ "Thompson equal third". The Age. Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. AAP–Reuters. 10 April 1967. p. 25. Retrieved 19 February 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ Alliss, Peter (1983). The Who's Who of Golf. Orbis Publishing. p. 361. ISBN 0-85613-520-8.
  4. ^ "Taiwan's Lu first rookie to win three golf titles". The Straits Times. Singapore. 25 April 1979. p. 32. Retrieved 19 February 2020 – via National Library Board.
  5. ^ "Bembridge Out of the Money". The Glasgow Herald. 18 February 1974. Retrieved 3 January 2020.

External linksEdit