Los Andes Province, Chile

Los Andes Province (Spanish: Provincia de Los Andes) is one of eight provinces of the central Chilean region of Valparaíso (V). The city of Los Andes is the capital of the province.

Los Andes Province
Provincia de Los Andes
Official seal of Los Andes Province
Location in the Valparaíso Region
Location in the Valparaíso Region
Los Andes Province is located in Chile
Los Andes Province
Los Andes Province
Location in Chile
Coordinates: 32°51′S 70°21′W / 32.850°S 70.350°W / -32.850; -70.350Coordinates: 32°51′S 70°21′W / 32.850°S 70.350°W / -32.850; -70.350
Country Chile
Region Valparaíso
CapitalLos Andes
Communes
Government
 • TypeProvincial
 • Presidential Provincial DelegateCristian Aravena Reyes (Socialist Party)
Area
 • Total3,054.1 km2 (1,179.2 sq mi)
 • Rank2
Population
 (2012 Census)[2]
 • Total102,819
 • Rank6
 • Density34/km2 (87/sq mi)
 • Urban
74,104
 • Rural
17,579
Sex
 • Men46,325
 • Women45,358
Time zoneUTC-4 (CLT[3])
 • Summer (DST)UTC-3 (CLST[4])
Area code56 + 34
WebsiteDelegation of Los Andes

AdministrationEdit

As a province, Los Andes is a second-level administrative division, governed by a provincial delegate who is appointed by the president. Edith Quiroz Ortiz, appointed by president Piñera on April 22, 2010, was the first woman to hold the office of Governor of Los Andes. The presidential provincial delegate appointed by president Gabriel Boric is Cristian Aravena Reyes, a Socialist.[1]

CommunesEdit

The province is composed of four communes (Spanish: comunas), each governed by a municipality consisting of an alcalde and municipal council:

Geography and demographyEdit

The province spans a landlocked area of 3,054.1 km2 (1,179 sq mi), the second largest in the Valparaíso Region. According to the 2002 census, Los Andes is the sixth most populous province in the region with a population of 91,683. At that time, there were 74,104 people living in urban areas, 17,579 people living in rural areas, 46,325 men and 45,358 women.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Municipality of Los Andes". Retrieved 28 July 2010.[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ a b c d (in Spanish) Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas
  3. ^ "Chile Time". WorldTimeZones.org. Archived from the original on 2007-09-11. Retrieved 2010-07-28.
  4. ^ "Chile Summer Time". WorldTimeZones.org. Archived from the original on 2007-09-11. Retrieved 2010-07-28.

External linksEdit