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Earl of Minto

  (Redirected from Lord Minto)

Earl of Minto, in the County of Roxburgh, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1813 for Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Baron Minto. The current earl is Gilbert Timothy George Lariston Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 7th Earl of Minto (born 1953).

Earl of Minto
Coronet of a British Earl.svg
Arms of the Earl of Minto

Blazon

Arms: Quarterly:1st & 4th, counterquartered, I & IV, Argent a Hunting Horn Sable, stringed Gules, in the dexter chief point a Crescent Gules, on a Chief wavy Azure, three Mullets Argent (Murray of Melgund); II & III, Azure, a Chevron Argent, between three Fleurs-de-lis Or (Kynynmound of that Ilk); 2nd & 3rd, Gules, on a Bend engrailed Or, a Baton Azure, within a Bordure Vair (Elliot of Minto); overall a Chief Argent, charged with a Moor’s Head couped in profile proper (augmentation, being the arms of Corsica). Crest: A dexter Arm embowed, issuant from Clouds, throwing a Dart, all proper. Supporters: Dexter: An Indian Sheep proper; Sinister: A Fawn proper.

Creation date 24 February 1813
Monarch The Prince Regent (acting on behalf of his father King George III)
Peerage Peerage of the United Kingdom
First holder Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Earl of Minto
Present holder Timothy Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 7th Earl of Minto
Heir apparent Gilbert Francis Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, Viscount Melgund
Subsidiary titles Viscount Melgund
Baron Minto
Baronet ‘of Headshaw’
Status Extant
Armorial motto Over the Crest:
NON EGET ARCU (He needs not the bow)
Below the shield:
SUAVITER ET FORTITER (Mildly but firmly)
Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound,
4th Earl of Minto

The family seat is Minto Park, near Hawick in the Scottish Borders. The original family seat, Minto Castle, was demolished some years ago after having been abandoned for some time.

Contents

HistoryEdit

The family descends from the politician and judge Gilbert Elliot, who served as a Lord of Session under the judicial title of Lord Minto. In 1700 he was created a baronet, of Minto in the County of Roxburgh, in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He was also a prominent judge and politician and served as a Lord of Session (under the judicial title of Lord Minto) from 1726 to 1733, as a Lord of the Justiciary from 1733 to 1765 and as Lord Justice Clerk from 1763 to 1766. His eldest son, the third Baronet, was a politician and held ministerial office as a Lord of the Admiralty from 1756 to 1762 and as Treasurer of the Navy from 1767 to 1770. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the fourth Baronet. He was a noted diplomat, politician and colonial administrator and served as Governor-General of India from 1807 to 1813. In 1797 he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Baron Minto, of Minto in the County of Roxburgh.[1] In 1813 he was further honoured when he was made Viscount Melgund, of Melgund in the County of Forfar, and Earl of Minto, in the County of Roxburgh.[2] The latter titles are in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. In 1797 Lord Minto assumed by Royal licence the additional surnames of Murray-Kynynmound after those of Elliot.

He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Earl. He was a diplomat and Whig politician and held office as First Lord of the Admiralty from 1835 to 1841 and as Lord Privy Seal from 1846 to 1852. Lord Minto was succeeded by his eldest son, the third Earl. He sat as a [[Liberal Party (UK)|LiberalMember of Parliament for Hythe, Greenock and Clackmannanshire. On his death the titles passed to his son, the fourth Earl. He was a prominent colonial administrator and served as Governor General of Canada from 1898 to 1904 and as Viceroy of India from 1905 to 1910. As of 2014 the titles are held by his great-grandson (the titles having descended from father to son), the seventh Earl, who succeeded in 2005.

The family seat is Minto, near Hawick, Roxburghshire. In 1992 Minto House was listed as Category A, and largely demolished within weeks.[3][4]

Elliot baronets, of Minto (1650-1797)Edit

Baron Minto (1797-1813)Edit

Earls of Minto (1813)Edit

Other family membersEdit

Numerous other members of the family have also gained distinction.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "No. 14052". The London Gazette. 7 October 1797. p. 968.
  2. ^ "No. 16700". The London Gazette. 2 February 1813. p. 251.
  3. ^ Bennett, Will (2 September 1992). "Minto House demolition starts". The Independent. Retrieved 2011-02-28.
  4. ^ "The Minto House Debacle". Institute for Historic Building Conservation. 1992. Retrieved 2011-02-28.

ReferencesEdit