Lithuanian Centre Union

The Lithuanian Centre Union, or Centre Union of Lithuania (Lithuanian: Lietuvos centro sąjunga, LCS), was a liberal[2] political party in Lithuania that existed between 1993 and 2003.

Lithuanian Centre Union
Lietuvos centro sąjunga
Founded1990
Dissolved2004
Split fromSąjūdis
Merged intoLiberal and Centre Union
Succeeded byLithuanian Centre Party
IdeologyLiberalism
Agrarianism[1]
Political positionCentre-right
Most MPs (1996)
13 / 141

HistoryEdit

It was established by the centre-fraction in Sąjūdis in 1990 as the Lithuanian Centre Movement. In 1992 parliamentary election the movement failed to pass 4 per cent threshold and won only 2 seats. In 1993 the movement was reorganised to party. In 1995 municipal elections the party entered many municipal councils and joined coalition with the Homeland Union and the Lithuanian Christian Democratic Party.

In 1996 parliamentary election the party won 8.67 per cent of the votes and 14 seats. It signed agreement of confidence and supply with the Homeland Union and the Lithuanian Christian Democratic Party. in 1997 presidential election the Centre Union supported Valdas Adamkus, who won election.

In spring of 2000, the Centre Union joined informal alliance between the New Union (Social Liberals), the Liberal Union of Lithuania and the Modern Christian-Democratic Union (known as the New Politics Coalition). In 2000 parliamentary election the party won 2.86 per cent of the votes and 2 seats. Coalition as a whole failed to win majority of the seats in Seimas and relied from the support of Lithuanian Peasants Party and Young Lithuania. Coalition lasted only 8 months.

In 2003 the party joined forces with the Liberal Union of Lithuania and the Modern Christian-Democratic Union to form the Liberal and Centre Union.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Arter, David (15 May 2017). From Farmyard to City Square? The Electoral Adaptation of the Nordic Agrarian Parties. Routledge. ISBN 9781351935531.
  2. ^ Nordsieck, Wolfram. "Lithuania". Parties and Elections in Europe. Archived from the original on 4 August 2004. Retrieved 28 May 2019.

External linksEdit