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List of winners of multiple Rugby World Cups

Since the inception of the Rugby World Cup in 1987, a total of twenty one rugby union players have won the Rugby World Cup twice.[citation needed]

Five Australia players - John Eales, Phil Kearns, Dan Crowley, Jason Little and Tim Horan – were part of both the 1991 and 1999 Wallabies squads. They were joined by South Africa player Os du Randt, who played for the Springboks in their 1995 and 2007 victories. Francois Steyn became the second South African player to win the competition twice, in the 2007 and 2019 Rugby World Cups.

In 2015, 14 New Zealand players won their second World Cup, having won in 2011.[1][2] Richie McCaw was the first player to captain his nation to two titles.[3] As coaches, both Steve Hansen and Wayne Smith were involved in New Zealand's 2011 and 2015 victories.

ListEdit

Name Country Years won
Dan Crowley   Australia 1991, 1999
John Eales   Australia 1991, 1999
Tim Horan   Australia 1991, 1999
Phil Kearns   Australia 1991, 1999
Jason Little   Australia 1991, 1999
Os du Randt   South Africa 1995, 2007
Dan Carter   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Ben Franks   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Owen Franks   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Jerome Kaino   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Richie McCaw   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Keven Mealamu   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Ma'a Nonu   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Kieran Read   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Colin Slade   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Conrad Smith   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Victor Vito   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Sam Whitelock   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Sonny Bill Williams   New Zealand 2011, 2015
Tony Woodcock   New Zealand 2011, 2015
François Steyn   South Africa 2007, 2019

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ De Menezes, Jack (1 November 2015). "RWC 2015: 14 All Blacks including Richie McCaw and Dan Carter join exclusive two-time World Cup winners' club". Independent. Retrieved 6 November 2015.
  2. ^ "It's only fitting that the All Blacks won the title". New Zealand Times. 6 November 2015. Retrieved 6 November 2015.
  3. ^ Lucas, Dan (1 November 2015). "New Zealand 34-17 Australia". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 November 2015.