List of types of marble

Wikimedia list article
Marble from Fauske in Norway.
Blocks of Carrara marble in Italy.

The following is a list of various types of marble according to location.

(NB: Marble-like stone which is not true marble according to geologists is included, but is indicated by italics and an endnote).

Contents

AfricaEdit

EgyptEdit

EthiopiaEdit

  • Dalati marble which is found in Western Oromia, is white in color processed in Addis Ababa and used for decorating floors and walls.[citation needed]

TunisiaEdit

  • Giallo antico — also known as Numidian marble (marmor numidicum in Latin), was a yellow marble quarried in Roman times from the area of Chemtou, ancient Simmithu

AsiaEdit

IndiaEdit

  • Makrana Marble - White Marble also known as Sangemarmar. Used in the Construction of the Taj Mahal, India & the White House, USA.
  • Bidasar Marble

Omani Limestone/Marble deposits are frequent and recurring in this moutaineous country. The most famous of these Marbles is Desert Beige which is quarried from Ibri Oman.

PakistanEdit

  • Historical cities in Pakistan, Lahore, Multan, Taxila, Peshawar, Karachi, Sibi etc. Buner is a famous city for marble in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Shigar Gilgit Baltistan Pakistan.

TurkeyEdit

EuropeEdit

 
Marble quarry in Naxos, Greece.

BelgiumEdit

Czech RepublicEdit

 
A stoup from brown Slivenec marble in the church in Dobřichovice

See webpage Dekorační kameny etc.

FranceEdit

GermanyEdit

GreeceEdit

IrelandEdit

ItalyEdit

MacedoniaEdit

NorwayEdit

RomaniaEdit

PolandEdit

PortugalEdit

RussiaEdit

SpainEdit

SwedenEdit

North AmericaEdit

OceaniaEdit

New ZealandEdit

EndnotesEdit

These entries are actually "false" marble, near-marble, or marble mis-nomers:

  1. ^ Geologists consider Ashford Black Marble to be a type of carboniferous limestone.
  2. ^ Geologists consider Connemara marble to be a type of serpentinite.
  3. ^ Geologists consider Purbeck Marble to be a type of limestone.
  4. ^ Geologists consider Sussex Marble to be a type of limestone.
  5. ^ Geologists consider St. Genevieve marble to be an oolitic limestone.
  6. ^ Geologists consider Tennessee marble to be a compressed limestone.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ [1] Retrieved 2015-08-29