List of the major 5000-meter summits of North America

Denali in Alaska is the highest mountain peak of North America. Denali is the third most topographically prominent and third most topographically isolated summit on Earth after Mount Everest and Aconcagua.

The following sortable table comprises the 11 mountain peaks of greater North America[1] with at least 5000 meters (16,404 feet) of elevation and at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence.[2]

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

  1. The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.[3][4]
  2. The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.[5][4]
  3. The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.[6]

In greater North America, only Denali exceeds 6000 meters (19,685 feet) elevation. Three major summits exceed 5500 meters (18,045 feet), the following 11 major summits exceed 5000 meters (16,404 feet), 21 exceed 4500 meters (14,764 feet), 124 exceed 4000 meters (13,123 feet), 277 exceed 3500 meters (11,483 feet), and 401 exceed 3000 meters (9843 feet) elevation.

Major 5000-meter summitsEdit

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Of the 11 major 5000-meter summits of North America, five are located in the United States, four in Canada, and three in México. Mount Saint Elias lies on the Canada-United States border and is the second highest major summit of both countries.

The 11 summits of North America with at least 5000 meters of topographic elevation and 500 meters of topographic prominence

Rank Mountain peak Region Mountain range Elevation Prominence Isolation Location
1 Denali[7][8][a]
(Mount McKinley)
  Alaska Alaska Range 6190.5 m
20,310 ft
6141 m
20,146 ft
7,450.24 63°04′08″N 151°00′23″W / 63.0690°N 151.0063°W / 63.0690; -151.0063 (Denali)
2 Mount Logan[9][10][b]   Yukon Saint Elias Mountains 5956 m
19,541 ft
5247 m
17,215 ft
623 km
387 mi
60°34′02″N 140°24′20″W / 60.5671°N 140.4055°W / 60.5671; -140.4055 (Mount Logan)
3 Pico de Orizaba[11][12][c]
(Citlaltépetl)
  Puebla
  Veracruz
Cordillera Neovolcanica 5636 m
18,491 ft
4922 m
16,148 ft
2,690.14 19°01′50″N 97°16′11″W / 19.0305°N 97.2698°W / 19.0305; -97.2698 (Pico de Orizaba)
4 Mount Saint Elias[13][14][d]   Alaska
  Yukon
Saint Elias Mountains 5489 m
18,009 ft
3429 m
11,250 ft
41.3 km
25.6 mi
60°17′34″N 140°55′51″W / 60.2927°N 140.9307°W / 60.2927; -140.9307 (Mount Saint Elias)
5 Popocatépetl[15][16][e][f]   México
  Morelos
  Puebla
Cordillera Neovolcanica 5410 m
17,749 ft
3040 m
9,974 ft
143 km
88.8 mi
19°01′21″N 98°37′40″W / 19.0225°N 98.6278°W / 19.0225; -98.6278 (Popocatépetl)
6 Mount Foraker[17][18][g]   Alaska Alaska Range 5304 m
17,400 ft
2210 m
7,250 ft
23 km
14.27 mi
62°57′37″N 151°23′59″W / 62.9604°N 151.3998°W / 62.9604; -151.3998 (Mount Foraker)
7 Mount Lucania[19][20][h][i]   Yukon Saint Elias Mountains 5260 m
17,257 ft
3080 m
10,105 ft
43 km
26.7 mi
61°01′17″N 140°27′58″W / 61.0215°N 140.4661°W / 61.0215; -140.4661 (Mount Lucania)
8 Iztaccíhuatl[21][22][j]   México
  Puebla
Cordillera Neovolcanica 5230 m
17,159 ft
1560 m
5,118 ft
17.51 km
10.88 mi
19°10′49″N 98°38′29″W / 19.1802°N 98.6415°W / 19.1802; -98.6415 (Iztaccíhuatl)
9 King Peak[23][24]   Yukon Saint Elias Mountains 5173 m
16,972 ft
1073 m
3,520 ft
4.68 km
2.91 mi
60°35′00″N 140°39′18″W / 60.5833°N 140.6549°W / 60.5833; -140.6549 (King Peak)
10 Mount Bona[25][26][k]   Alaska Saint Elias Mountains 5044 m
16,550 ft
2103 m
6,900 ft
80 km
49.7 mi
61°23′08″N 141°44′58″W / 61.3856°N 141.7495°W / 61.3856; -141.7495 (Mount Bona)
11 Mount Steele[27][28][l]   Yukon Saint Elias Mountains 5020 m
16,470 ft
760 m
2,493 ft
9.45 km
5.87 mi
61°05′34″N 140°18′42″W / 61.0929°N 140.3118°W / 61.0929; -140.3118 (Mount Steele)

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ The summit of Denali is the highest point of the Alaska Range, the State of Alaska, the United States of America, and greater North America. Denali is the third most topographically prominent and third most topographically isolated summit on Earth after Mount Everest and Aconcagua.
  2. ^ The summit of Mount Logan is the highest point of the Saint Elias Mountains, Yukon, and all of Canada.
  3. ^ The summit of Pico de Orizaba is the highest point of Estado Libre y Soberano de Puebla, Estado Libre y Soberano de Veracruz de Ignacio de la Llave, and all of México.
  4. ^ Mount Saint Elias is the second highest major summit of both Canada and the United States.
  5. ^ Popocatépetl on the border of Puebla is the highest point of both Estado Libre y Soberano de México and Estado Libre y Soberano de Morelos.
  6. ^ Popocatépetl is the southernmost 5000-meter (16,404-foot) summit of México and greater North America.
  7. ^ Mount Foraker is the westernmost 5000-meter (16,404-foot) summit of Alaska, the United States, and greater North America.
  8. ^ The summit of Mount Lucania is the highest point of the northern Saint Elias Mountains.
  9. ^ Mount Lucania is the northernmost summit of its elevation in Canada.
  10. ^ Iztaccíhuatl is the northernmost and westernmost 5000-meter (16,404-foot) summit of México.
  11. ^ The summit of Mount Bona is the highest point of the northwest Saint Elias Mountains.
  12. ^ Mount Steele is the northernmost and easternmost 5000-meter (16,404-foot) summit of Canada.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ This article defines greater North America as the portion of the continental landmass of the Americas extending westward and northward from the Isthmus of Panama plus the ocean islands surrounding that landmass. This article defines the ocean islands of greater North America to include the coastal islands of North America, the islands of the Caribbean Sea, the Lucayan Archipelago, the islands of Greenland (Kalaallit Nunaat), the islands of Canada, and the islands of Alaska. The Hawaiian Islands are not included because they are considered part of Oceania.
  2. ^ This article defines a significant summit as a summit with at least 100 meters (328.1 feet) of topographic prominence, and a major summit as a summit with at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence. All summits in this article have at least 500 meters of topographic prominence. An ultra-prominent summit is a summit with at least 1500 meters (4921 feet) of topographic prominence.
  3. ^ All elevations in the 48 states of the contiguous United States include an elevation adjustment from the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD 29) to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). For further information, please see this United States National Geodetic Survey note.
  4. ^ a b If the elevation or prominence of a summit is calculated as a range of values, the arithmetic mean is shown.
  5. ^ The topographic prominence of a summit is the topographic elevation difference between the summit and its highest or key col to a higher summit. The summit may be near its key col or quite far away. The key col for Denali in Alaska is the Isthmus of Rivas in Nicaragua, 7642 kilometers (4749 miles) away.
  6. ^ The topographic isolation of a summit is the great-circle distance to its nearest point of equal elevation.
  7. ^ "Denali". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  8. ^ "Denali". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  9. ^ "Mount Logan". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  10. ^ "Mount Logan". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  11. ^ "Pico de Orizaba". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  12. ^ "Pico de Orizaba". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  13. ^ "Mount Saint Elias". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  14. ^ "Mount Saint Elias". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  15. ^ "Popocatépetl". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  16. ^ "Popocatépetl". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  17. ^ "Mount Foraker". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  18. ^ "Mount Foraker". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  19. ^ "Mount Lucania". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  20. ^ "Mount Lucania". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  21. ^ "Iztaccíhuatl". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  22. ^ "Iztaccíhuatl". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  23. ^ "King Peak". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  24. ^ "King Peak". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  25. ^ "Mount Bona". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  26. ^ "Mount Bona". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  27. ^ "Mount Steele". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.
  28. ^ "Mount Steele". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 May 2016.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 63°04′08″N 151°00′23″W / 63.0690°N 151.0063°W / 63.0690; -151.0063 (Denali)