List of American live-action shorts

This is a list of short subject film series released by Hollywood studios.

ColumbiaEdit

(This list excludes multi-chapter serials: see List of film serials by studio#Columbia Pictures)

  • Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences - one special (1949)
  • Alan Mowbray (1941–1942) - 2 two-reelers
  • Andy Clyde (1935–1956) - 73 comedy two-reelers
  • Animal Cavalcade (1952–1953) - 4 one-reel comedies, much footage recycled from earlier shorts
  • Bedtime Stories for Grown-Ups (1929–1932) - 18 one-reelers with Eddie Buzzell
  • Ben K. Blake Film Novelty specials: Yoo-Hoo General (1942), My Wife's An Angel (1943) & A Voice Is Born (1947)
  • Bert Wheeler (1950–1951) - 2 two-reelers
  • Billie Burke (1948) - 2 two-reelers
  • Billy Gilbert (1943–1944) - 3 two-reelers
  • Broadway Follies (1937–1938) - 5 musical one-reelers directed by Ben K. Blake
  • Buster Keaton (1939–1941) - 10 two-reelers
  • Candid Microphone (1948–1954) featuring Allen Funt and produced by Ben K. Blake
  • Cavalcade of Broadway (1949–1952) - 12 New York nightlife shorts
  • Charley Chase (1937–1940) - 20 two-reelers
  • Cinescope (1939–1941) - 17 one-reel documentaries including a few travelogues by André de la Varre
  • Columbia Star Comedies (those headlining one two-reeler each; these didn’t become long-term series like the Three Stooges or Andy Clyde): Charlie Murray (1935), Franklin Pangborn (1935), Guinn "Big Boy" Williams (1936), Herman Bing (1937), Danny Webb (Special, 1939), Wally Brown & Tim Ryan (together, 1949), Harry Mimo (1953), The Mischief Makers (1954, 1 two-reeler of an Our Gang type series), Girlie Whirls (starring Muriel Landers, 1957)
  • Columbia Musical Novelties (1933–1934) - 8 comedy/musical two-reelers, often with dialogue entirely in rhyme.
  • Columbia Specials (1936–1944)- about 9, including a Cosmocolor short Fashion Takes a Holiday (1940)
  • Columbia Topnotchers (1953–1954) - set of 4 one-reel documentaries
  • Columbia Tour (1936–1944) - 32 one-reel travelogues
  • Community Sing (1937–1949) - 124 musical sing-a-long shorts, produced by Ben K. Blake after '40
  • Court of Human Relations ((1936–1937) - 4 dramatic one-reelers produced by TruPictures.
  • Eddie Foy, Jr. (1945–1951) - 3 two-reelers
  • El Brendel (1936–1945) - 19 two-reelers, 2 costarring Harry Langdon and 1 costarring Shemp Howard
  • Film Vodvil ((1943–1946) - produced by Ben K. Blake
  • Fools Who Made History (1939) - pair of dramatic two-reelers
  • Football Thrills (1931) - 6 sports-reels
  • George Givot and Cliff Nazarro (1943) - 2 two-reelers
  • George Sidney and Charles Murray (1934) - 6 comedy two-reelers
  • The Glove Slingers (1939–1943) - 12 two-reelers, with Noah Beery, Jr., David Durand, and Bill Henry alternating leads
  • Gus Schilling and Richard Lane (1945–1950) - 11 two-reelers
  • H. A. Ripley's Minute Mysteries (1933–1934) - 10 one-reelers produced by John Randolph Bray
  • Hall Room Boys Photoplays (pre-Columbia: 1919–1923) - before Columbia started, Harry Cohn worked on this series
  • Harry Langdon (1934–1945) - 22 comedy two-reelers
  • Harry Von Zell (1946–1950) - 8 two-reelers
  • Hugh Herbert (1943–1952) - 23 two-reelers
  • Joe Besser (1938, 1949–1956) – 1 two-reeler in ’38, followed by 11 more later
  • Joe DeRita (1946–1948) - 4 two-reelers
  • Laughing with Medbury (1931–1935) - John P. Medbury hosted travelogues (27 total)
  • Johnny Downs (1942) - 2 two-reelers
  • Johnny Walker International Forum (1941) – 3 two-reelers
  • Lambs Club (1933) - 8 comedies showcasing members
  • Leon Errol (1933–1934) - 5 comedy two-reelers
  • Life's Last Laughs (1934–1935) - 6 one-reel spoofs on epitaphs
  • Max Baer and Maxie Rosenbloom (1950–1952) - 4 two-reelers
  • Monkeyshines (1931) - 5 comedies with an ape cast
  • Monty Collins and Tom Kennedy (1935–1938) - 10 two-reelers, plus one with Monty solo (1936). Tom also co-starred with Johnny Arthur in one 1938 two-reeler.
  • Music Hall Vanities (1939) - trio of shorts
  • Music to Remember (1950) - 6 classical musical performances
  • Musical Travelark (1954–1967) - 34 travelogues initially in CinemaScope and all in color. Harry Foster directed several.
  • New York Parade (film series) (1940) - pair of documentaries (1940)
  • Panoramics (1940–1945) - 14 one-reel documentaries
  • Polly Moran (1936–1937) - 2 two-reelers
  • Quiz Reel (film series) (1941–1942) - 5 one-reelers
  • The Radio Rogues (1935) - 3 two-reelers
  • Rambling Reporter travelogue (1930–1931) - 13 one-reelers
  • Roscoe Karns (1941) - 2 two-reelers
  • Screen Snapshots (C-B-C company: 1920–1924; Columbia: 1924–1958) - series of shorts that looked at the lives of various Hollywood stars
  • Shemp Howard (1944–1947) - 9 two-reelers
  • Slim Summerville (1943–1944) - 2 two-reelers
  • Smith and Dale (1938–1939) - 2 two-reelers
  • Special Happy Hour (1937–1939) - 7 one-reelers
  • Spice of Life - Literary Digest Jokes (1934–1935) - 7 one-reelers
  • Stars of Tomorrow (1935) - 6 one-reelers
  • Sterling Holloway (1946–1948) - 6 two-reelers
  • Strange as It Seems (1936–1937) - 8 drama/documentary two-reelers produced by the Screen Classics Studio
  • Take It or Leave It (1940–1941) - produced by Ben K. Blake
  • The Three Stooges (1934–1958) - 190 two-reelers
  • Thrills of Music (1946–1949) - 23 big band musicals
  • Una Merkel (1943–1944) - 2 two-reelers
  • Vera Vague (1943–1952) - 16 two-reelers
  • Victor Gems (1929–1930) - 31 short musicals
  • Victory Shorts (1942–1944), some by the Office of War Information
  • Voice of Experience (1935–1936) - 10 one-reel advice shorts produced by Rex Film and Ben K. Blake
  • Wally Vernon and Eddie Quillan (1948–1956) - 16 two-reelers
  • Walter Catlett (1934–1940) - 6 comedy two-reelers produced sporadically
  • Walter Futter Curiosities (1930–1932) - 28 one-reel documentaries
  • The Washington Parade (1938–1941) - 12 one-reelers profiling the capital
  • World in Color travelogues (1937–1938) - 5 made in Cinecolor
  • World of Sports (1932–1967) – 263+ one-reelers produced by John Randolph Bray in the early years and directed by Jack Kofoed until 1939, when Harry Foster took over. Most were in black and white prior to the sixties.
  • Columbia also distributed many independent productions, including many imports from the National Film Board of Canada and the award-winning People Soup and Norman Rockwell's World... An American Dream.
  • The Learning Corporation of America was mostly owned by Columbia between 1968 and 1975 (although the company continued through the early '90s), being responsible for many short educational films for schools (often 16mm), along with TV specials and theatrical shorts like the award-winning Angel and Big Joe (1975).

Educational PicturesEdit

(Distributed through Fox Film and 20th Century Fox, 1932–1938)

First NationalEdit

Fox Film and 20th Century FoxEdit

Hal RoachEdit

(Distributed by Pathé Exchange, 1914–1928, and MGM, 1927–1938)

Mack SennettEdit

Metro Pictures (pre-MGM)Edit

MGMEdit

  • Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences (1950) – 3 one-reelers in black and white
  • Around the World with Burton Holmes (1930–1931) – 12 one-reel travelogues
  • CinemaScope Specials (1953–1956) – approximately 8, early ones were orchestra performances led by Johnny Green. Also The Battle of Gettysburg (1955 film)
  • Colortone Musical (1929–1935) - 17 one and two reel musicals in Technicolor, utilizing the full rainbow process from mid-1934.
  • Colortone Revue (1929–1930) – 5 black and white (but sepia tone released) comedies, two with Jack Benny.
  • Crime Does Not Pay (1935–1946) - 49 two-reel dramatic shorts
  • Dogville Comedies (1929–1931) - nine short parodies of feature films enacted by dogs, also known as All-Barkies.
  • FitzPatrick Traveltalks (1931–1953) – travelogues initially released independently in the late twenties, but approximately 221 one-reelers for MGM. In full Technicolor starting in 1934.
  • Hal Roach Comedies (distributed between 1927 and 1938)
  • Herbert Kalmus Great Events (silent, 1927–1929) – 12 two-reelers produced in 2-color Technicolor, costumed recreations of famous events from Betsy Ross to Cleopatra.
  • Historical Mysteries (1937–1938) – 11 one reel docu-shorts narrated by Carey Wilson and John Nesbitt
  • Louis Lewyn Galaxy of Stars (1934–1937) – 7 Technicolor two-reelers featuring many familiar faces. Also a few “MGM Miniatures” in black & white later followed the same model.
  • MGM Movietone Acts (1928–1930) - 82 one-reelers spotlighting various comedy and musical acts in sound
  • MGM Oddities / MGM Miniatures (1-reel, 1932–1946, 1951–1955) – about 115+ documentaries and comedy shorts running less than 11 minutes in length. Term “Oddity” replaced by “Miniature” by 1935. Early “Oddities” narrated by Pete Smith (two in color) and later Carey Wilson. Charles "Chic" Sale appeared in some mid-thirties entries. Also a series profiling Nostradamus.
  • MGM Musical Revue (1933–1934) – 9 two-reelers including some Three Stooges in early Technicolor
  • MGM 2-Reel Special (1927–1929, 1931, 1933–1945) - includes a documentary 24 Dollar Island directed by Robert Flaherty, also Jackie Cooper special (1931), followed by a more consistently released series starting in 1935, often musicals.
  • Martin Block Musical Merry-Go-Round (1947–1948) – 6 total
  • Office of War Information & War Activities Committee Specials (1941–1943)
  • Our Gang (1938–1944) taken over from Hal Roach.
  • The Passing Parade (1938–1949) - 73 strange-but-true stories narrated by John Nesbitt.
  • Pete Smith series (1931–1955)
    • Fisherman's Paradise (6 sports-reels, 1 in early Technicolor, 1931–1932)
    • Sports Champions / Sports Parade (36 one-reelers, 1931–1936)
    • Goofy Movies (10 one-reel spoofs edited from various silent film clips, 1933–1934)
    • 3D film Specials (3 made in 1935, ’37 & ’40)
    • Specialties (214 live-action documentary/comedies 1935–1955, at least 18 in color. Dave O'Brien appeared in many ‘40s and ‘50s comedy titles)
  • Robert Benchley Comedies (1935–1940; 1943–1944) – 30 one reelers
  • Romance of Celluloid (1937–1944) – behind the scenes documentaries
  • Spotlight on the World We Live In (1951) – newsreel series made by Gordon Films
  • Stop Look and Listen (film) (1967)
  • Tabloid Musical (1936–1937) – 7 one-reelers, including the famous Every Sunday
  • Theater of Life (1946–1948) – 4 two-reel documentaries co-produced by the Associated Press
  • UFA “Oddity” (1927–1929) – 43 imported from Germany silent documentaries

ParamountEdit

Pathé ExchangeEdit

(Company merged with RKO in 1931. This list excludes multi-chapter serials: see List of film serials Pathé Exchange)

  • Adventures of Bill & Bob (1920–1922)
  • Benny Rubin Comedies (1930–1931)
  • Chronicles of America (1923–1924)
  • Edgar Jones Westerns (1921)
  • Fred H. Kiser Industrial Films (1922–1923)
  • Grantland Rice's Sportlight (1923–1933) and “Football Sense” (1927)
  • Hal Roach comedies (distributor, 1914–1927)
  • Harvard University Department of Geology (1928–1929)
  • Henry & Polly (1927) with Leah Baird and Taylor Holmes
  • Hugh Wiley’s Wildcat (1929–1930) with Ford Washington Lee and John William Sublett
  • Indian Frontier (1924) with Ed Brady
  • James A. Fitzpatrick Famous Melodies (1926)
  • Johnny Jones (1922) featuring Edward Peil Jr.
  • Knute Rockne sports-reels (1930)
  • Mack Sennett comedies (distributor, 1923–1929)
  • Major Allen’s Safari (1921)
  • Monty Banks shorts and features (1927–1930)
  • On Guard with Arch Heath (1927)
  • Pathé Novelty (1922–1928) – umbrella title for assorted documentaries and specials
  • Pathé Review (silent version, 1919–1930, sound version called “Pathé Audio Review”, 1929–1933) - multi-subject shorts made on an average of 52 per year, usually with one or two segments in color (often stenciled).
  • Pathé Sound Comedies (1929–1932) known by different sub-titles: Campus Comedies, Capitol Comedies, Checker Comedies, E. B. Derr Comedies, Follies, George Le Maire Comedies, Golden Roosters, Manhattan Comedies, Melody Comedies, Rainbow Comedies, Rodeo Comedies, Rufftown Comedies, Smitty & His Pals, Variety Comedies and Whoopee Comedies. These featured Nat Carr, Daphne Pollard, Edgar Kennedy, James Gleason, William Frawley, Harry Watson, Jr., Reginald Merville, Franklyn Pangborn and Dot Farley
  • Range Rider Westerns (1922–1923) starring Leo D. Maloney
  • Rarebits (1927–1928) produced by Record Pictures
  • Raymond L. Ditmars Nature Reels (1912–1915). He also made segments for the Pathé Review.
  • Smitty & His Pals (1928–29) - 2 reel comedies produced by Amadee J. Van Beuren
  • Song Sketches (1930) directed by Oscar Lund and produced by Amadee J. Van Beuren
  • Sound Topics of the Day (1929–1930) directed by Alfred T. Mannon and produced by Amadee J. Van Beuren
  • Stereoscopiks (1925) – 3D film experiments produced by Frederick Eugene Ives and Jacob Leventhal
  • Tom Santschi Westerns (1921)
  • Topics of the Day (for Timely Prod., 1919–1929) produced by Amadee J. Van Beuren
  • Travelesque (1927–1928) featuring Will Rogers
  • True Detective Stories (1924)
  • Vagabond Adventure (1930–1931, for RKO- Pathé: 1931–1937) - travelogues produced by Amadee J. Van Beuren
  • Walter Futter Curiosities (1928–1929) produced by Amadee J. Van Beuren
  • World Geography (1927–1928) produced by Duncan Underbill

RepublicEdit

(This list excludes multi-chapter serials: see List of film serials by studio#Republic Pictures)

  • Land of Opportunity (1949–1950) – four documentaries
  • Meet the Stars (1940–1941) – 11 one-reelers
  • This World of Ours (1950–1955) – Carl Dudley produced Trucolor travelogues
  • Trucolor Specials (1956)

RKOEdit

(These do not include the Pathé shorts listed above)

United ArtistsEdit

UniversalEdit

(This list excludes multi-chapter serials: see List of film serials by studio#Universal Pictures)

Sound FilmsEdit

  • Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences one-reel special 1949
  • America Speaks (1942–1943) – 3 one-reel documentaries
  • Answer Man (1946–1948) – 15 one-reel documentaries
  • Arthur Lake comedies (1928–1930), initially the silent “Horace in Hollywood” two-reel comedies
  • Basketball Sports-reels (written by Albert H. Kelley and Samuel Freeman) (1931)
  • Benny Rubin (1929) – approximately 7 sound one-reel comedies
  • Charlie Murray & George Sidney Comedies (1930–1931) – 11 two-reelers
  • Christy Walsh All-America Sportreel (1931–1932) – 15 sports-reels
  • Daphne Pollard Comedies (1931–1932) – 4 two-reelers
  • Earth and Its People (1947–1949) – 35 two-reel travelogues initially released to schools in 16mm format, theatrically in 35mm in 1952-53.
  • Going Places (1934–1941) - 92 travelogues with Lowell Thomas and Graham McNamee (after ’38) narrating. Produced/directed by Allyn Butterfield and Charles E. Ford
  • Junior Jewel Comedies (1929–1930) with Snappy and “The Sporting Youth”, including Ann Christy, Sumner Getchell & Joan McCoy
  • Juvenile Jury (1946–1947) – 4 quiz novelty reels with Jack Barry (game show host)
  • Laemmle Novelties (1928–1929) – first sound series with musical and stage performances. Vernon Dent and Lou Archer appeared together in one.
  • Lloyd Hamilton Comedies (1931–1932) – 4 two-reelers
  • Louis Sobol (1932–1934) – 4 one and two-reelers
  • Mentone Brevity (1933–1939) – 77 variety shorts shot in New York City with many stage performers like Ethel Barrymore, Bill Robinson, Bob Hope, among others.
  • Morton Downey in “America's Greatest Composers” (1932–1933) – trio of shorts
  • Name Band Musical (1939–1957) – 214 California filmed 15–20 minute shorts showcasing the best in jazz and big band
  • Northwest Mounted Police (sound film series) (1929–1930) – two-reelers with Ted Carson
  • Pat Rooney (1929) – 6 two-reel comedies
  • Person-Oddity (1942–1946) – 48 human interest documentaries (one-reel) produced by Thomas Mead & Joseph O'Brien
  • Pioneer Kid (1929–1930) – two-reel westerns with Bobby Nelson, some initially filmed silent with sound dubbed in.
  • Red Star Comedy (1930–1932) – approximately 12 two-reelers with an assortment (including Edgar Kennedy, Tom O’Brian, Franklin Pangborn & Jack Duffy)
  • Robert Benchley (1933) – one short “Your Technocracy And Mine”
  • The Shadow (film series version) (1931–1932) – 6 two-reel fantasy-dramas adapted from the radio show with Arthur Aylesworth
  • Sing & Be Happy (1945–1949) – 29 musical one-reelers
  • Slim Summerville (1930–1934) – 20 two-reel comedies
  • Strange as it Seems (1930–1934) – 39 newsreel oddity-reels much like Believe It Or Not produced by Jerry Fairbanks and Manny Nathan Hahn, adapted from John Hix comics and shown in Multicolor during the first two seasons.
  • Stranger Than Fiction (1934–1942) – 110 documentary shorts, successor to Strange As It Seems covering animals, travel and peculiar items of interest. Production by Allyn Butterfield, Thomas Mead and Joseph O’Brien with Charles E. Ford and later Henry Clay Bate as key directors.
  • Sunny Jim McKee (1929–1930) – two-reel juvenile comedies
  • SuperSpecial Featurettes (1959–1968) – 23 running 20–30 minutes in color
  • Syd Saylor Comedies (1930) – 5 two-reelers
  • Thalians Club Comedies (1931–1932, 1934) – 5 two-reelers with Franklyn Pangborn and others.
  • Universal Brevities & Novelties (1930–1934) – 16 documentary one-reelers
  • Universal Color Adventures (1962–1972) – approximately 57 assorted one and two-reel documentaries
  • Universal-International Color Parade (1952–1962) – approximately 72 one and two-reel documentaries.
  • Universal-International Musical Westerns (1948–1949) - 19 two-reelers featuring Tex Williams and other country singers
  • Universal Specials (1930–1958, 1969–1972) – 45 comedy and documentary two-reelers not part of any series, in color by the ‘50s.
  • Universal Newsreel (1929–1967), also including a group of annual “Football Highlights” specials (1959–1967)
  • Van Ronkel Comedies (1935) – 6 two-reelers mostly with Sterling Holloway
  • Variety View (film series) (1941–1958) – 260 documentary one-reelers replacing “Going Places” and produced by Thomas Mead and initially Joseph O'Brien. All in black and white.
  • Vernon Dent (1929–1930) – pair of comedies
  • Victory Shorts (1942–1944) – 7 documentary one-reelers
  • Vistarama Specials (1954–1957) – 9 widescreen Eastmancolor travelogues produced by Carl Dudley
  • Warren Doane Comedies (1932–1935) – 46 two-reelers with James Gleason, Louise Fazenda, Sterling Holloway, Henry Armetta and others.
  • William Rowland & Monty Brice Featurettes (1932–1933) - 6 two-reel musicals, featuring such acts as Ruth Etting and the Boswell Sisters

Silent Films (pre-1928)Edit

  • Arthur Lake “Drugstore Cowboy” Series (1927–1928) – two-reel westerns
  • The Battling Cowboy (1924–1925)
  • Ben Hall Comedies (1927–1928)
  • Bert Roach Comedies (1923–1924)
  • Bess the Detectress (1914)
  • Big U (Universal) Productions (1914–1917) – both comedies and dramas
  • Bison Film Company (1912–1917) co-produced with Universal
  • Bluebird Comedy (1925–1927) – one-reelers featuring Neely Edwards, Charles Puffy, Arthur Lake and others. The Bluebird logo also handled occasional special shorts since 1916.
  • Bob Curwood Westerns (1927–1928)
  • Brunton Comedies (1922) co-produced with Universal
  • Bull’s Eye Comedies (1924–1925) – one-reelers featuring Bert Roach, Neely Edwards & Alice Howell
  • Century Studios Comedies (1917–1928), co-produced with Universal both one and two-reel comedies featuring Edith Roberts, Jimmie Adams, Alice Howell, the Century Lions (1918–1921), Joe Martin the chimpanzee (1919–1920), Brownie the Dog (1919–1923), Harry Sweet (after 1920), Baby Peggy (after 1921), Lee Moran (1922), Queenie (a horse), Maude (a mule), Buddy Messinger (1923), Pal (a dog, 1923) and Wanda Wiley (1924). The Stern Brothers took over and added other series: The Gumps (with Joe Murphy, Fay Tincher & Jack Morgan, 1923–1928), Buster Brown (with Arthur Trimble & Doreen Turner, 1925–1929), The Excuse Makers (with Wanda Wiley & Charles King, 1926–1927), What Happened To Jane? (1926–1927), Let George Do It (with Syd Saylor, 1926–1929), Newlyweds (with Syd Saylor, Ethlyne Clair, Jack Egan, Derelys Perdue & Sunny Jim McKee, 1926–1929), Keeping Up with the Joneses (1927–1928), Rube Goldberg Mike & Ike (1927–1929) and the assorted Stern Bros. Comedies (1925–1926).
  • Champion Boy Rider (1927–1928) – two-reel westerns
  • Champion Film Company (1912–1913)
  • Charles Puffy Comedies (1928)
  • The Collegians (1925–1929) – two-reel comedies made by the Junior Jewel division with George J. Lewis, Eddie Phillips and others. Soundtracks added to the later entries.
  • Crystal Films (1912–1914) co-produced with Universal, featuring “Baldy” Joseph Belmont, Vivian Prescott and Pearl White
  • Cyclone Smith (1919) – two-reel adventures with Eddie Polo
  • Eclair (1912–1915) co-produced with Universal
  • Famous Finlay Nature Pictures (1918) – documentaries featuring William L. Finley
  • Fast Steppers (1924) – two-reelers
  • The Forest Rangers (series) (1928–1929)
  • Francis Ford Dramas (1913–1915)- mostly one-reel
  • Gem Productions (1912–1913), co-produced with Universal one-reel comedies with Billy Quirk as well as mini-documentaries
  • Gold Seal Productions (1913–1917) – ranging from one to three reels, including the “Lord John’s Journal” and “Under the Crescent” series
  • Hoot Gibson Westerns (1917–1921, 1926)
  • Hysterical History (1924–1925) – mostly one-reel spoofs on history with Slim Summerville, Billy Franey and others.
  • IMP (1912–1917) was Universal’s initial flagship company with many comedies, dramas and documentaries, including the “Blinks” series with Charles DeForrest (1913) and some ambitious dramas starring King Baggot.
  • Jack Dempsey “Fight & Win” (1924) – two reelers
  • Jack London’s “Tales of the Fish Patrol” (1922–1923) – two-reel outdoor adventures with Jack Mulhall, Louise Lorraine and others
  • Joker Film (1912–1917) co-produced with Universal many one-reel comedies with an assortment of big names: Grace Cunard, Louise Fazenda, Max Asher, Bobby Vernon, Billy Franey, Ernest Shields, Gale Henry and others. There were also travelogue and human interest documentary segments edited into split reels.
  • L-KO Kompany (1914–1919) produced many Mack Sennett-influenced slapstick comedies through Universal distribution, some directed by Henry Lehrman. Stars included Raymond Griffith, Gertrude Selby, Billy Armstrong, Phil Dunham, Hank Mann, Alice Howell and Billie Ritchie.
  • Laemmle Films (1915–1917) – various comedies and dramas
  • The Leather Pushers (1921–1924) – sports drama two-reelers, with Billy Sullivan
  • Mirror (Universal film series) (1922) was a 4-part series featured vintage newsreel footage like President McKinley
  • Mustang (western shorts) (1925–1928) – two reel westerns with Edmund Cobb
  • Nestor Studios (1912–1919) co-produced with Universal with its best comedies of the period with Eddie Lyons, Lee Moran and Billy Franey.
  • Northwest Mounted Police (silent film series) (1927–1929) with Jack Perrin and Nelson McDowell
  • Okeh Komedy (1919)
  • Pat Powers Picture Plays (1912–1917) - both mini-dramas and documentaries. *Rainbow Film Productions (1920–1923)
  • Red Feather Productions (1916)
  • Rex Motion Picture (1912–1917) co-produced with Universal
  • St. Louis Motion Picture (1913–1914) co-produced with Universal
  • Slim Summerville & Bobby Dunn Comedies (1923–1925)
  • Star Comedies (1917–1923) – including Hank Mann, Eddie Boland, Bartine Burkett, Austin Howard, Bert Roach, Cliff Bowes, Dorothea Wolbert, Eddie Lyons, Lee Moran, Neely Edwards and Ford Sterling. Also Star featurettes (1917) with Mary Fuller, Averill Harris & Clara Beyers
  • Sterling Film Comedies (1912–1914) – all one-reel
  • Tales of the Old West (1923)
  • Tempest Cody (1919) – two-reelers with Marie Walcamp
  • Tenderfoot (1928–1929) – two reel westerns with George Chandler
  • The Texas Rangers (1928–1929) – two-reel westerns with Fred Gilman
  • Tom London Westerns (1920–1921)
  • Universal featurette (1918–1919) – assorted two and three reelers
  • Universal Ike (1914)
  • Universal Screen Magazine (followed by “New Screen Magazine”) (1916–1921) – 205 shorts
  • Universal Westerns (1917–1925) – additional 2-reelers with various performers
  • Victor Film (1912–1916) co-produced with Universal assorted one and two-reelers starring Florence Lawrence and J. Warren Keringan
  • Walter Forde Productions (1923)
  • William Wolbert as “Willy the Walrus” (1914)

Walt DisneyEdit

Warner Bros.Edit

Other seriesEdit

See alsoEdit

The Scales of Justice

ReferencesEdit

  • BoxOffice Magazine (release date information in multiple issue “Shorts Charts”) [1]
  • Bradley, Edwin M. (2005). The First Hollywood Sound Shorts, 1926-1931. McFarland & Company.
  • Braff, Richard E. (1999). The Universal Silents: A Filmography of the Universal Motion Picture Manufacturing Company, 1912-1929. McFarland & Company.
  • Fielding, Raymond (1978). The March of Time 1935-1951. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195022122.
  • Film Daily Magazine (short film listings) [2]
  • Fitzgerald, Michael G. (1977). Universal Pictures: A panoramic history in words, pictures, and filmographies. Arlington House. (lists all studio theatrical shorts of the 1930s and 40s)
  • Koszarski, Richard (2008). Hollywood On the Hudson: Film and Television in New York from Griffith to Sarnoff. Rutgers University Press. ISBN 9780813542935.
  • Lahue, Kalton C. (1966). Word of Laughter – The Motion Picture Comedy Short 1910-1930. University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0806112549.
  • Liebman, Roy (2003). Vitaphone Films – A Catalogue of the Features and Shorts. McFarland & Company. ISBN 9780786412792.
  • Maltin, Leonard (1972). The Great Movie Shorts. Bonanza Books.
  • Motion Picture Herald magazine (short film listings) [3]
  • Motion Pictures 1912-1939 Catalog of Copyright Entries 1951 Library of Congress [4]
  • Motion Pictures 1940-1949 Catalog of Copyright Entries 1953 Library of Congress [5]
  • Motion Pictures 1950-1959 Catalog of Copyright Entries 1960 Library of Congress [6]
  • Motion Pictures 1960-1969 Catalog of Copyright Entries 1971 Library of Congress [7]
  • Motion Picture News Booking Guide, Motion Picture News Inc. (primary editor: William A. Johnston), each edition has a selection of short subject releases:
    • April 1922 edition [8]
    • October 1922 edition [9]
    • April 1923 edition [10]
    • October 1923 edition [11]
    • April 1924 edition [12]
    • October 1926 edition [13]
    • Motion Picture News Booking Guide and Studio Directory (October 1927) [14]
    • 1929 edition [15]
  • Okuda, Ted & Watz, Edward The Columbia Comedy Shorts: Two-Reel Hollywood Film Comedies, 1933-1958 1998 McFarland & Company
  • Ward, Richard Lewis (2006). A History of the Hal Roach Studios. Southern Illinois University Press. ISBN 0809327279.