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List of riders with stage wins at all three cycling Grand Tours

The Grand Tours are the three most prestigious multi-week stage races in professional road bicycle racing.[1][2] The competitions are the Giro d'Italia, Tour de France and Vuelta a España, contested annually in that order. They are the only stage races permitted to last longer than 14 days.[3]

The Giro d'Italia, Tour de France, and Vuelta a España are collectively known as the Grand Tours of cycling. The oldest of the races, the Tour, began in 1903, while the Giro first started in 1909 and the Vuelta in 1935. The modern editions of the races all consist of 21 days of racing with two rest days spread throughout race calendar, giving riders at most 63 chances to win a stage in a Grand Tour each year.

Winning a stage in a Grand Tour is significant achievement and winning a stage in each Grand Tour is a rare feat that only 98 riders have achieved in their careers. Fiorenzo Magni was the first rider to win a stage in each Grand Tour with his victory in the stage 7 individual time trial at the 1955 Vuelta a España.[4] The most recent rider to accomplish this task was Simon Yates after he won stage 12 of the 2019 Tour de France.

Cyclists are ranked on the basis of their total stage wins in the three Grand Tours. When there is a tie between cyclists they are listed alphabetically. The majority of stage winners across the three tours have come from Europe, however there have been a few non-European cyclists who have accomplished this feat. Colombian Luis Herrera was the first non-European rider to win a stage in each of the Grand Tours when he completed the triple with his victory in stage 13 at the 1989 Giro d'Italia. The first North American to complete this feat is Tyler Farrar with his victory in stage 3 of the 2011 Tour de France. Simon Gerrans became the first person from the Southern Hemisphere to win a stage at each Grand Tour with his victory at the 2009 Vuelta a España in tenth leg. Djamolidine Abdoujaparov is the only Asian cyclist on the list.

Eddy Merckx, with 65 victories, has won the most stages at the Grand Tours. Mario Cipollini is second with 57, Mark Cavendish and Alessandro Petacchi are joint third with 48. Merckx has won the most Tour stages with 34, while Cipollini leads the tally for career stage wins at the Giro d'Italia with 42 to his name. Delio Rodríguez has the most stage wins in the history of the Vuelta a España (39 stages) but he failed to win any stages in the Tour de France or Giro d'Italia and is thus not represented in this list.[5]

Contents

ListEdit

 
Eddy Merckx won 64 stages between the Grand Tours during his racing years.
 
Bernard Hinault won 41 stages at the Grand Tours between the years 1978 and 1986.
 
Miguel Poblet (center) won 26 stages between all three Grand Tours during his professional racing career.
 
Jean-Paul van Poppel won a total of 22 stages at the Grand Tours.
 
Djamolidine Abdoujaparov won seventeen stages between the Grand Tour races that he competed in during his cycling career.
 
Federico Bahamontes won a total of eleven stages at the Grand Tours between the years 1957 and 1964.
 
Mark Cavendish ranks third overall and first among active riders with 48 Grand Tour stage wins since 2008.


Riders in bold are still active.

Riders who have won a stage in each Grand Tour
Rank Cyclist Country Winning span Giro Tour Vuelta Total Ref(s)
1 Eddy Merckx   Belgium 1967–1975 24 34 6 64
2 Mario Cipollini   Italy 1989–2003 42 12 3 57 [6][7]
3 Mark Cavendish   United Kingdom 2008–2016 15 30 3 48 [8][9]
Alessandro Petacchi   Italy 2000–2011 22 6 20 48 [10]
5 Bernard Hinault   France 1978–1986 6 28 7 41
6 Rik Van Looy   Belgium 1958–1969 12 7 18 37
7 Freddy Maertens   Belgium 1976–1981 7 15 13 35
8 Marino Basso   Italy 1967–1975 15 6 6 27
Francesco Moser   Italy 1973–1986 23 2 2 27
10 Guido Bontempi   Italy 1981–1993 16 6 4 26
Miguel Poblet   Spain 1955–1960 20 3 3 26 [11]
12 Laurent Jalabert   France 1992–1999 3 4 18 25 [12]
Rik Van Steenbergen   Belgium 1949–1957 15 4 6 25 [13]
14 Roger De Vlaeminck   Belgium 1972–1984 22 1 1 24
15 Jacques Anquetil   France 1957–1964 5 16 1 22
André Greipel   Germany 2009–2017 7 11 4 22 [14][15]
Jean-Paul van Poppel   Netherlands 1986–1994 4 9 9 22
18 Gerben Karstens   Netherlands 1965–1976 1 6 14 21
Tony Rominger   Switzerland 1988–1996 5 3 13 21
20 Marcel Kittel   Germany 2011–2017 4 14 1 19
21 Rudi Altig   Germany 1962–1969 4 8 6 18
Nino Defilippis   Italy 1952–1964 9 7 2 18
23 Djamolidine Abdoujaparov   Uzbekistan 1991–1996 1 9 7 17
24 Fiorenzo Magni   Italy 1948–1955 6 7 3 16
Alejandro Valverde   Spain 2003–2018 1 4 11 16
26 Gianni Bugno   Italy 1988–1998 9 4 2 15
Felice Gimondi   Italy 1965–1976 7 7 1 15
Rik Van Linden   Belgium 1972–1977 9 4 2 15
29 Chris Froome   United Kingdom 2011–2018 2 7 5 14
José Manuel Fuente   Spain 1971–1974 9 2 3 14
Thor Hushovd   Norway 2001–2011 1 10 3 14
Vincenzo Nibali   Italy 2010–2019 7 6 1 14 [16][17]
Joaquim Rodríguez   Spain 2003–2015 2 3 9 14 [18]
Marcel Wüst   Germany 1995–2000 1 1 12 14 [19]
Alex Zülle   Switzerland 1993–2000 3 2 9 14 [20][21]
36 Pierino Baffi   Italy 1955–1963 4 5 4 13
Laurent Fignon   France 1982–1992 2 9 2 13
Walter Godefroot   Belgium 1967–1975 1 10 2 13
Hugo Koblet   Switzerland 1950–1956 7 5 1 13
Eddy Planckaert   Belgium 1981–1989 1 2 10 13
Guido Reybrouck   Belgium 1965–1970 3 6 4 13
Dietrich Thurau   Germany 1976–1979 2 6 5 13
43 John Degenkolb   Germany 2012–2018 1 1 10 12
Julio Jiménez   Spain 1964–1968 4 5 3 12
Nicola Minali   Italy 1994–1998 2 3 7 12
46 Federico Bahamontes   Spain 1957–1964 1 7 3 11
Daniele Bennati   Italy 2007–2011 3 2 6 11 [22]
Jeroen Blijlevens   Netherlands 1995–1999 2 4 5 11 [23]
Miguel María Lasa   Spain 1970–1981 3 2 6 11 [24]
Gilberto Simoni   Italy 2000–2007 8 2 1 11
Ján Svorada   Czech Republic 1994–2001 5 3 3 11
Lucien Van Impe   Belgium 1972–1983 1 9 1 11
53 Guido Carlesi   Italy 1958–1965 7 2 1 10
David Millar   United Kingdom 2001–2012 1 4 5 10
Edward Sels   Belgium 1964–1969 1 7 2 10
Jean Stablinski   France 1957–1967 2 5 3 10
57 Tom Dumoulin   Netherlands 2015–2018 4 3 2 9
Philippe Gilbert   Belgium 2009–2015 3 1 5 9
Dimitri Konyshev   Russia 1990–2001 4 4 1 9
Elia Viviani   Italy 2015–2019 5 1 3 9
61 Fabio Baldato   Italy 1993–2003 4 2 2 8
Jean-François Bernard   France 1986–1990 4 3 1 8
Paolo Bettini   Italy 2000–2008 2 1 5 8 [25]
Luis Herrera   Colombia 1984–1992 3 3 2 8
Marino Lejarreta   Spain 1982–1991 2 1 5 8
Thierry Marie   France 1986–1992 1 6 1 8
Michael Matthews   Australia 2013–2017 2 3 3 8
Denis Menchov   Russia 2004–2012 2 1 5 8 [26]
Matteo Trentin   Italy 2013–2019 1 3 4 8 [27][28]
70 Erik Breukink   Netherlands 1987–1992 2 4 1 7
Caleb Ewan   Australia 2015–2019 3 3 1 7 [29][30]
Aitor González   Spain 2002–2004 3 1 3 7
Ercole Gualazzini   Italy 1969–1977 4 2 1 7
Nairo Quintana   Colombia 2013–2019 3 3 1 7 [31][32]
Bernardo Ruiz   Spain 1948–1955 1 2 4 7
Simon Yates   United Kingdom 2016–2019 3 2 2 7 [33][34]
77 Fabio Aru   Italy 2014–2017 3 1 2 6
Giovanni Battaglin   Italy 1975–1981 4 1 1 6
Rino Benedetti   Italy 1952–1962 4 1 1 6
Laudelino Cubino   Spain 1987–1995 2 1 3 6
Tyler Farrar   United States 2009–2012 2 1 3 6 [35]
Massimo Ghirotto   Italy 1988–1994 3 2 1 6
Charly Mottet   France 1986–1991 1 3 2 6
Thibaut Pinot   France 2012–2019 1 3 2 6 [36][37]
Michel Pollentier   Belgium 1974–1984 1 3 2 6
86 Pablo Lastras   Spain 2001–2012 1 1 3 5 [38]
Vicente López Carril   Spain 1971–1976 1 3 1 5
Robert Millar   United Kingdom 1983–1989 1 3 1 5 [39]
Serguei Outschakov   Ukraine 1993–1999 2 1 2 5 [40]
Jesper Skibby   Denmark 1989–1995 1 1 3 5
91 Rohan Dennis   Australia 2015–2018 1 1 2 4
Seamus Elliott   Ireland 1960–1963 1 1 2 4
Simon Gerrans   Australia 2008–2013 1 2 1 4
Oliverio Rincón   Colombia 1993–1996 1 1 2 4
Thomas De Gendt   Belgium 2012–2019 1 2 1 4 [41]
96 Juan Manuel Gárate   Spain 2001–2009 1 1 1 3 [42]
Tyler Hamilton   United States 2002–2004 1 1 1 3
David Zabriskie   United States 2004–2011 1 1 1 3

Riders who have a stage at each Grand Tour in a calendar yearEdit

An ever rarer accomplishment is to win a stage at all the Grand Tours in one single calendar year. This feat has only been accomplished by three riders in history. The first rider was Spain's Miguel Poblet who won a total of eight stages at all three Grand Tours in 1956. Two years later, Pierino Baffi won six stages between all three Grand Tours. The third, and most recent, rider was Italian cyclist Alessandro Petacchi who won fifteen stages at the Grand Tours in 2003.

Riders who have won a stage in each Grand Tour in a single year
Year Cyclist Country Giro Stage Wins Tour Stage Wins Vuelta Stage Wins Total Ref(s)
1956 Miguel Poblet   Spain 4 1 3 8 [1][43]
1958 Pierino Baffi   Italy 1 3 2 6 [1][43]
2003 Alessandro Petacchi   Italy 6 4 5 15 [1][43]

Ullrich and ContadorEdit

 
Jan Ullrich (pictured in Pisa during his winning time trial at the 2006 Giro) and Alberto Contador retroactively lost their place on the all-time list after being stripped of their Giro stage wins.

Two more riders, Jan Ullrich and Alberto Contador, have won stages in all three Grand Tours, but both were retroactively stripped of their stage wins in the Giro d'Italia.

  • Alberto Contador is one of seven riders who won the general classification at all Grand Tours. Contador won two stages and the general classification of the 2011 Giro d'Italia, but lost his 2011 results due to a positive test for clenbuterol in the 2010 Tour de France.[47] The CAS initially suspended Contador on 25 January 2011, but he appealed the decision, allowing him to compete in the 2011 Giro d'Italia and Tour de France. He lost his appeal on 6 February 2012 and was given a two-year ban with retroactive effect, starting from the day of his positive doping test on 21 July 2010, and was thereby stripped of his Giro results.[48] Contador also won the Giro d'Italia in 2008 and 2015, but did so without winning a stage on both occasions.

ReferencesEdit

Citations
  1. ^ a b c d Heijmans & Mallon 2011, p. 95.
  2. ^ "Million dollar, baby!". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. 12 January 2007. Retrieved 21 May 2011.
  3. ^ "UCI Cycling Regulations". Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI). Archived from the original (ASP) on 23 June 2011. Retrieved 29 April 2011.
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  5. ^ CyclingWeekly (2007-09-13). "PETACCHI RACKS UP THE WINS IN THE VUELTA". Cycling Weekly. IPC Media Limited. Retrieved 2014-05-21.
  6. ^ "Mario Cipollini". SR/Olympic Sports. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2014-05-12.
  7. ^ Heijmans & Mallon 2011, p. 49.
  8. ^ Birnie, Lionel (9 September 2010). "Cavendish completes the set of grand tour stage wins". Cycling Weekly. TI Media. Retrieved 11 July 2019.
  9. ^ "Mark Cavendish to race in RideLondon-Surrey Classic on Sunday". BBC Sport. BBC. 26 July 2018. Retrieved 11 July 2019. [...] added the Manxman, who has won 48 Grand Tour stages – 30 at the Tour.
  10. ^ "Petacchi confirms retirement from cycling". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. 13 June 2013. Retrieved 21 May 2011.
  11. ^ Heijmans & Mallon 2011, p. 160.
  12. ^ "Report". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. 1999-05-18. Retrieved 2014-05-21.
  13. ^ Heijmans & Mallon 2011, p. 222-223.
  14. ^ Farrand, Stephen (12 July 2011). "Greipel defeats Cavendish for stage win in Carmaux". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. Retrieved 11 July 2019.
  15. ^ Long, Jonny (15 June 2019). "André Greipel quits Critérium du Dauphiné with stomach virus, which could put his Tour de France at risk". Cycling Weekly. TI Media. Retrieved 11 July 2019. Despite having 11 Tour de France stage wins to his name, his last victory in the race came two years ago on the Champs-Élysees, and the 36-year-old has struggled to find the form that has seen him pick up a total of 22 Grand Tour stage wins.
  16. ^ Cary, Tom (6 July 2014). "Tour de France 2014: Vincenzo Nibali wins second stage after launching late attack in Sheffield". The Daily Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Retrieved 28 July 2019.
  17. ^ MacLeary, John (27 July 2019). "Egan Bernal on verge of Tour de France history as Colombian all but seals title after Vincenzo Nibali wins in mountains". The Daily Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Retrieved 28 July 2019.
  18. ^ "Joaquim Rodríguez". ProCyclingStats.
  19. ^ Tim Maloney (2000-07-05). "Wüst pounces Zabel for first ever Tour stage win". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2014-05-21.
  20. ^ "Alex Zülle". SR/Olympic Sports. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2014-05-12.
  21. ^ Heijmans & Mallon 2011, p. 250.
  22. ^ Shane Stokes (2008-05-12). "Bennati completes good day for Liquigas, Pellizotti holds on". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2014-05-21.
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  25. ^ "Paolo Bettini". SR/Olympic Sports. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2014-05-12.
  26. ^ Andrew Hood (2009-05-13). "Menchov wins stage 5; Di Luca in pink". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. Retrieved 2009-10-15.
  27. ^ "Vuelta a Espana: Trentin wins stage 4". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 22 August 2017. Retrieved 21 July 2019. Matteo Trentin (Quick-Step Floors) won stage 4 of the Vuelta a España with a cool sprint in a messy finale in Tarragona, joining the club of riders with stage wins in all three Grand Tours.
  28. ^ "Tour de France 2019: Matteo Trentin wins stage 17 as Julian Alaphilippe stays in yellow jersey". BBC Sport. BBC. 24 July 2019. Retrieved 24 July 2019.
  29. ^ Brown, Gregor (17 July 2019). "Long-awaited Tour de France victory lifts pressure off Caleb Ewan". Cycling Weekly. TI Media. Retrieved 17 July 2019. He now counts wins in all three Grand Tours.
  30. ^ Scrivener, Peter (28 July 2019). "Tour de France 2019: Egan Bernal wins, Geraint Thomas second, Caleb Ewan wins in Paris". BBC Sport. BBC. Retrieved 28 July 2019.
  31. ^ Farrand, Stephen (29 August 2016). "Vuelta a Espana: Nairo Quintana wins stage 10". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 25 July 2019.
  32. ^ Ryan, Barry (25 July 2019). "Tour de France: Quintana wins stage 18". Cyclingnews.com. Future plc. Retrieved 25 July 2019.
  33. ^ "Tour de France 2019: Simon Yates claims maiden stage win". BBC Sport. BBC. 18 July 2019. Retrieved 18 July 2019. He has now won stages at all three Grand Tours, having previously won at the Giro d'Italia and Vuelta a Espana.
  34. ^ Long, Jonny (21 July 2019). "Simon Yates wins Tour de France stage 15 as Pinot takes back more time". Cycling Weekly. TI Media. Retrieved 21 July 2019.
  35. ^ Velonews.com (2011-07-04). "Farrar first on the Fourth, wins stage 3 of the 2011 Tour de France". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. Retrieved 2014-05-21.
  36. ^ Fotheringham, Alasdair (9 September 2018). "Pinot completes Grand Tour stage victory set at Vuelta a Espana". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  37. ^ Long, Jonny (20 July 2019). "Thibaut Pinot takes stage 14 Tour de France victory as Alaphilippe gains time on Thomas". Cycling Weekly. TI Media. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  38. ^ Tim Maloney (2003-07-25). "Lastras blasts to second iBanesto stage victory". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2014-05-21.
  39. ^ Birnie, Lionel (9 September 2010). "Cavendish completes the set of grand tour stage wins". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 8 August 2011.
  40. ^ "Stage 13 Report". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. 1995-07-18. Retrieved 2014-05-21.
  41. ^ O'Shea, Sadhbh (8 September 2017). "Vuelta a Espana: De Gendt takes Grand Tour stage triptych". cyclingnews.com. Retrieved 10 September 2017.
  42. ^ Anthony Tan (2009-07-25). "Garate grabs emphatic Ventoux victory". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2014-05-21.
  43. ^ a b c Jeff Jones (2009-09-03). "Petacchi equals Poblet and Baffi". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2014-05-21.
  44. ^ "Stage 20, El Tiemblo – Avila, ITT, 46 kms". Cycling News. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  45. ^ "Jan Ullrich found guilty of an anti-doping rule violation by the Court of Arbitration for Sports (CAS)" (PDF). Press Release. Court of Arbitration for Sport. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 February 2012. Retrieved 9 February 2012.
  46. ^ "Jan Ullrich given two-year ban from CAS". Cyclingnews. Future Publishing limited. 9 February 2012. Retrieved 9 February 2012.
  47. ^ "Alberto Contador found guilty of an anti-doping rule violation by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS): suspension of two years" (PDF). The Court of Arbitration for Sport. 6 February 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 February 2012. Retrieved 13 February 2011.
  48. ^ "CAS sanctions Contador with two year ban in clenbutorol case". Cyclingnews. Future Publishing Limited. 6 February 2012. Retrieved 6 February 2012.
Bibliography