List of political parties in South Korea

This article lists political parties in South Korea. South Korea has a weakly institutionalized multi-party system,[1][2] characterized by frequent changes in party arrangements. Political parties have a chance of gaining power alone.

Current partiesEdit

Main partiesEdit

Party Assembly
seats
Party leader Floor leader Position Ideology
Parliamentary group   Democratic Party
더불어민주당
176 Lee Nak-yon

(Elected August 29)

Kim Tae-nyeon Centre[3] to centre-left[4] Liberalism[5]
Social liberalism[6]
  People Power Party
국민의힘
103 Kim Chong-in Joo Ho-young Right-wing[7] Conservatism
Anti-communism
Non-Parliamentary group Justice Party
정의당
6 Sim Sang-jung Bae Jin-gyo Centre-left[8] Social democracy
People Party
국민의당
3 Ahn Cheol-soo Kwon Eun-hee Centre to centre-right Conservative liberalism
Open Democratic Party
열린민주당
3 Lee Keun-shik Kim Jin-ae Centre to centre-left Social liberalism
Basic Income Party
기본소득당
1 Shin Ji-Hae Yong Hae-In Single-issue Universal Basic Income
(Single issue)
Transition Korea
시대전환
1 Centre[9] Pragmatism[9]

Extra-parliamentary partiesEdit

Conservative partiesEdit

Centrist partiesEdit

Liberal partiesEdit

Progressive partiesEdit

Single-issue partiesEdit

Unknown stances, third way, or syncretic partiesEdit

Defunct partiesEdit

 
Timeline of all mainstream political parties

Conservative partiesEdit

Mainstream partiesEdit

Minor partiesEdit

Liberal partiesEdit

Mainstream partiesEdit

Minor partiesEdit

Progressive partiesEdit

Green partiesEdit

Banned partiesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Wong, Joseph (2015). "South Korea's Weakly Institutionalized Party System". Party System Institutionalization in Asia: Democracies, Autocracies, and the Shadows of the Past. Cambridge University Press. pp. 260–279.
  2. ^ Wong, Joseph (2012). "Transitioning from a dominant party system to multi-party system: The case of South Korea". Friend or Foe? Dominant Party Systems in Southern Africa: Insights from the Developing World. United Nations University Press. pp. 68–84.
  3. ^ The Democratic Party of Korea is described as a centrist party by numerous sources:
  4. ^
  5. ^ The Democratic Party of Korea is described as a liberal party by numerous sources:
  6. ^ "An Identity Crisis for South Korea's Opposition". The Diplomat. 31 December 2015. South Korea's main opposition social-liberal party is reeling (again) from intraparty factional struggle. Rebranded earlier this week "the Minjoo Party of Korea" (formerly New Politics Alliance for Democracy), the party is searching for a new identity and direction after high profile and popular assemblyperson Ahn Cheol-soo defected on December 13.
  7. ^ "Three minor parties merge ahead of April elections". Yonhap News Agency. 24 February 2020. Last Monday, the main opposition Liberty Korea Party merged with the New Conservative Party and Forward for Future 4.0 to create the right-wing United Future Party (UFP).
  8. ^ "Minor opposition party picks Rep. Shim Sang-jung as new chief". Yonhap News. 2015-07-18. Retrieved 2020-03-11.
  9. ^ a b "시대전환 '비례연합정당' 참여하나… 16일 중 최종결정". Kyunghyang Shinmun. 16 March 2020. Retrieved 14 July 2019. 중도·실용주의 신생정당인 ‘시대전환’이 16일 더불어민주당이 주도하는 비례연합정당 참여를 최종 결정할 예정인 것으로 전해졌다.
  10. ^ Yonhap News Agency, December 19, 2014, [1], “...South Korea's Constitutional Court on Friday ordered the dissolution of a pro-North Korean minor opposition party...”

BibliographyEdit