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While there is ample evidence to indicate the health benefits of diets rich in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains and nuts, no specific food has been acknowledged by scientists and government regulatory authorities as providing a health benefit. Current medical research is focused on whether health effects could be due to specific essential nutrients or to phytochemicals which are not defined as essential.[1]

The following is a list of phytochemicals present in commonly consumed foods.

Contents

Terpenoids (isoprenoids)Edit

Carotenoids (tetraterpenoids)Edit

CarotenesEdit

orange pigments

XanthophyllsEdit

yellow pigments

TriterpenoidEdit

DiterpenesEdit

MonoterpenesEdit

SteroidsEdit

Phenolic compoundsEdit

Natural monophenolsEdit

PolyphenolsEdit

FlavonoidsEdit

red, blue, purple pigments

IsoflavonoidsEdit

AuronesEdit

ChalconoidsEdit

FlavonolignansEdit

LignansEdit

Phytoestrogens seeds (flax, sesame, pumpkin, sunflower, poppy), whole grains (rye, oats, barley), bran (wheat, oat, rye), fruits (particularly berries) and vegetables.[2]

StilbenoidsEdit

CurcuminoidsEdit

TanninsEdit

Hydrolyzable tanninsEdit
Condensed tanninsEdit
PhlorotanninsEdit

extracted from brown alga species (Ecklonia cava, Sargassum mcclurei), sea oak (Eisenia bicyclis, Fucus vesiculosus).

Flavono-ellagitanninEdit

extracted from Mongolian Oak (Quercus mongolica).

Aromatic acidEdit

Phenolic acidsEdit

Hydroxycinnamic acidsEdit

PhenylethanoidsEdit

OthersEdit

GlucosinolatesEdit

BetalainsEdit

ChlorophyllsEdit

Other organic acidsEdit

AminesEdit

CarbohydratesEdit

MonosaccharidesEdit

PolysaccharidesEdit

Protease inhibitorsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit