List of people granted executive clemency by Donald Trump

During his tenure as president of the United States (January 20, 2017–January 20, 2021), Donald Trump granted executive clemency to 237 individuals charged or convicted of federal criminal offenses, using his clemency power under Article II, Section 2 of the Constitution. Ordinarily, all requests for executive clemency for federal offenses are directed to the Office of the Pardon Attorney (OPA) in the U.S. Department of Justice for review; however, Trump frequently bypassed the OPA, and the majority of his executive clemency grants were made to well-connected convicts who did not file a petition with the OPA or meet the OPA's requirements.[1][2] Overall, Trump granted less clemency than any modern president.[3]

Of the pardons and commutations that Trump did grant, the vast majority were to persons to whom Trump had a personal or political connection, or persons for whom executive clemency served a political goal.[2][3][4] A significant number had been convicted of fraud or public corruption.[5] The New York Times reported that during the closing days of the Trump presidency, individuals with access to the administration, such as former administration officials, were soliciting fees to lobby for presidential pardons.[6]

BackgroundEdit

The U.S. president's power of clemency arises from Article II of the United States Constitution. Clemency "may take several forms, including pardon, commutation of sentence, remission of fine or restitution, and reprieve",[7] with the two most commonly used forms being a pardon or commutation. A pardon is an official forgiveness for an acknowledged crime. Once a pardon is issued, all further punishment for the crime is waived.[8] The president can only grant pardons for federal offenses.[9] When the president commutes a sentence, it reduces the severity of a sentence without voiding the conviction itself; for example, a commutation may reduce or eliminate a prison term, while leaving other punishments intact.[7] The power of clemency is "one of the most unlimited powers bestowed on the president by the Constitution."[1]

Trump's use of executive clemencyEdit

For 125 years, the key adviser to the president on clemency has been the Department of Justice's Office of the Pardon Attorney (OPA) which normally reviews all requests for pardons.[1] However, Trump often bypassed the OPA, and, unlike previous presidents, made the majority of his grants to executive clemency to "well-connected offenders who had not filed petitions with the pardon office or did not meet its requirements."[1] On February 19, 2020, Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy requested information on the process used by Trump in deciding to grant clemency to 11 people the preceding day.[10][11] In response to the criticism of his bypassing of the OPA, Trump said that he is the "chief law enforcement officer of the country."[12] Legal experts raised concerns that Trump was "relying on his personal connections rather than the Justice Department's established review process for finding convicts deserving of clemency."[12] A late December 2020 analysis by Harvard Law School's Jack Goldsmith determined that "seven of the 94 Trump grants came on recommendation from the pardon attorney" and "at least 84 out of 94 Trump pardons had a personal or political connection to the president."[2] Ultimately, of the 237 grants of clemency by Trump, only 25 came through the Office of the Pardon Attorney's process (which at the end of Trump's presidency had a backlog of 14,000 applications); the other clemency recipients came to Trump's attention through an ad hoc process at the Trump White House that benefited clemency applicants with money or connections to Trump allies, friends, and family members.[4]

Trump frequently granted executive clemency to his supporters or political allies,[13][14] or following personal appeals or campaigns in conservative media,[15] as in the cases of Rod Blagojevich, Michael Milken, Joe Arpaio, Dinesh D'Souza, and Clint Lorance, as well as Bernard Kerik.[13] Trump granted clemency to five of his former campaign staff members and political advisers: Paul Manafort, Roger Stone, Michael Flynn, Stephen K. Bannon, and George Papadopoulos.[16] Many of Trump's grants of clemency were criticized by the federal agents and prosecutors who investigated and prosecuted the cases.[17] Trump's grant of clemency to Stone in July 2020 marked the first time Trump granted clemency to a "figure directly connected to the president's campaign."[13] Representatives Jerrold Nadler and Carolyn B. Maloney, who chair two House committees, said that "No other president has exercised the clemency power for such a patently personal and self-serving purpose" and said that they would investigate whether Stone's commutation was a reward for protecting Trump.[13] Most Republican elected officials remained silent on Trump's commutation of Stone.[14] Exceptions were Republican senators Mitt Romney, who termed the commutation "unprecedented, historic corruption," and Pat Toomey, who called the commutation a "mistake" due in part to the severity of the crimes of which Stone was convicted.[13][18][19]

Trump granted executive clemency to three court-martialed U.S. military officers who were accused or convicted of war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan.[20] Trump granted the pardons against the advice of senior military and Defense Department leadership, as well as U.S. military lawyers.[20] Critics state that Trump's pardons of the officers undermined military discipline, constituted an inappropriate interference in the U.S. military justice system, and called into question the U.S. commitment to the law of armed conflict.[21][22][23] Tensions between Trump and the Defense Department regarding Trump's interventions in the military justice system culminated in the firing of Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer.[20][24][25] Two ex-military officers pardoned by Trump appeared with the president at campaign events in 2019.[25]

Trump issued pardons to seven Republican congressmen convicted of crimes: Chris Collins, Duncan D. Hunter, Steve Stockman, Rick Renzi, Robin Hayes, Mark Siljander, and Randall "Duke" Cunningham.[16] Trump also granted clemency to at least ten healthcare executives and doctors convicted in large-scale Medicare fraud schemes.[17][26] The National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association criticized Trump's pardons to executives who orchestrated massive Medicare frauds.[27]

Many wealthy individuals have paid advisors to Trump many tens of thousands of dollars for them to lobby Trump to grant pardons, largely bypassing the review process of the Office of the Pardon Attorney.[28]

Former Justice Department official and Mueller investigation prosecutor Andrew Weissmann noted that the language of Trump's pardons varied, ranging from a broad pardon of Michael Flynn to narrower pardons for several others, including Paul Manafort and Roger Stone, which Weissmann argued created "windows of opportunity" to prosecute individuals who had been narrowly pardoned.[29]

List of recipients of executive clemency from TrumpEdit

PardonsEdit

Trump issued 143 pardons: one in 2017, six in 2018, eight in 2019, twelve in 2020, and 116 in January 2021.[30]

Date of pardon[31] Name[31] Court[31] Sentencing date[31] Sentence[31] Offense[31] Notes
August 25, 2017 Joseph M. Arpaio District of Arizona October 5, 2017 N/A – Arpaio's pardon was issued after his conviction, but prior to his being sentenced. Criminal contempt of court Former sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona and anti-illegal immigration hardliner, Arpaio was convicted of contempt of court and was awaiting sentencing. Arpaio was pardoned for one contempt offense of which he had been convicted (but not yet sentenced) and for any not-yet-charged offenses he may have committed in the same case. In issuing the pardon, the White House said that Arpaio had given "more than fifty years of admirable service to" the United States.[32][33]
March 9, 2018 Kristian Mark Saucier District of Connecticut August 19, 2016 One year in prison, three years of supervised release, and 100 hours of community service Unauthorized possession and retention of national defense information Saucier was given an other-than-honorable discharge from the Navy for taking photos in a military submarine.[34] At sentencing, Saucier unsuccessfully argued for probation rather than imprisonment on the basis that Hillary Clinton was not indicted for her email controversy.[35]
April 13, 2018 I. Lewis (Scooter) Libby the District of Columbia June 14, 2007 30 months of prison, two years of probation, and a $250,000 fine Perjury (two counts), obstruction of justice and false statements Previously an aide to former vice president Dick Cheney. Convicted in connection with the CIA leak scandal. Pardoned following an earlier commutation by President George W. Bush in July 2007.[36][37][38]
May 24, 2018 John Arthur (Jack) Johnson Northern District of Illinois September 14, 1920 One year and one day in prison, and $1,000 fine Violation of the Mann Act Famed boxer, convicted by an all-white jury in 1913 for traveling with his white girlfriend. It was then illegal to transport women across state lines for "immoral" purposes.[39][40][41][42]
May 31, 2018 Dinesh D'Souza Southern District of New York September 23, 2014 Five years of probation, eight months of supervision in a halfway house, and a $30,000 fine Campaign finance violations In 2014, conservative commentator D'Souza pleaded guilty to making illegal campaign contributions to the 2012 Senate campaign of his Republican friend, Wendy Long.[43][44][45]
July 10, 2018
  • Dwight Lincoln Hammond Jr.
District of Oregon October 7, 2015 Five years in prison Arson on federal land Father and son ranchers were convicted of arson on federal land in 2012. While initially sentenced to time served, their sentence was increased in 2015 to the mandatory 5-year minimum term under federal law.[46] The increased sentence triggered protests which culminated in the armed occupation of a wildlife refuge.[47] The Hammonds had rejected the protesters' assistance.[47][48][49]
  • Steven Dwight Hammond
May 6, 2019 Michael Chase Behenna General court martial, U.S. Army February 28, 2009 Forfeiture of all pay and allowances; confinement for 20 years (amended from 25 years on July 2, 2009); dismissal from service Assault and unpremeditated murder Behanna, a U.S. Army first lieutenant, was convicted by a court-martial of the murder of an Iraqi man. He was released on parole in 2014.[50]
May 15, 2019 Conrad Moffat Black Northern District of Illinois December 10, 2007 42 months in prison, two years of supervised release, and $125,000 fine Mail fraud and attempted obstruction of justice Former media mogul, current friend, supporter and biographer of President Trump.[51] Conviction reviewed by the Supreme Court in Black v. United States; convictions later upheld. Released from prison in 2014 and deported to Canada where he was born.[52]
May 15, 2019 Patrick James Nolan Eastern District of California February 18, 1994 33 months in prison, three years of supervised release, and $10,000 fine Conducting the affairs of an enterprise through a pattern of racketeering Former Republican lawmaker who pled guilty to soliciting for illegal campaign donations after being caught by the Shrimpscam sting operation by the FBI. Ultimately served 26 months; released in 1996 and became an activist for criminal-justice reform.[53]
July 29, 2019 John Richard Bubala Southern District of Indiana April 5, 1991 Two years' probation, conditioned upon four months' community confinement and two months' home confinement Conversion of government property Pleaded guilty to improper use of federal government property by transferring automotive equipment to the town of Milltown, Indiana, for its maintenance use. His primary aim was to help the town, and he sought neither compensation nor recognition for his actions.[54]
July 29, 2019 Roy Wayne McKeever Western District of Oklahoma March 2, 1989 One year in prison and one year of supervised release Transporting marijuana After being arrested for transporting marijuana from Mexico to Oklahoma, he immediately accepted responsibility and pleaded guilty to one count of using a telephone to facilitate the distribution of a controlled substance.[54]
July 29, 2019 Rodney Masaru Takumi District of Hawaii February 9, 1987 Two years of probation and fined $250 Working at an illegal gambling parlor While working, he was arrested during a law enforcement raid.[54]
July 29, 2019 Michael Anthony Tedesco Western District of Pennsylvania December 7, 1990 One year in prison and five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribute in excess of 5 kilograms of cocaine and quantities of marijuana Former president Barack Obama pardoned him in 2017 for drug trafficking, but due to a clerical error, his fraud conviction was not encompassed within that grant of executive clemency.[54]
July 29, 2019 Chalmer Lee Williams Eastern District of Kentucky May 25, 1995 Four months in prison and three years of supervised release Conspiracy to steal firearms and other goods as part of an interstate shipment; theft from shipment in interstate commerce; theft of firearms shipped in interstate commerce Participated in and was convicted of several crimes related to the theft and sale of stolen firearms. Upon arrest, he immediately accepted responsibility for his actions. In light of his impeccable behavior while serving his sentence, his supervised release terminated one year early, and in 1998, the governor of Kentucky restored his voting rights.[54]
October 10, 2019 Zay Jeffries Southern District of New York November 12, 1948 $2,500 fine Conspiracy to violate the Sherman Antitrust Act (Anti-competitive practices) Posthumous pardon. Jeffries was convicted of violating the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 through his engineering firm's work. His indictment in 1941 was deferred until 1947, due to his efforts during World War II.[55]
November 15, 2019 Mathew L. Golsteyn General court martial, U.S. Army N/A – Golsteyn's pardon was issued before his trial. N/A (not tried or convicted) Premeditated murder On December 13, 2018, Golsteyn, then serving as a major in the United States Army, was charged with the murder of a suspected bomb-maker in Afghanistan in 2010, following an interview in which he admitted to killing the man.[56] At the time of the pardon, Golsteyn's case had not yet gone to trial.[57]
November 15, 2019 Clint Lorance General court martial, U.S. Army August 1, 2013 Nineteen years in prison, forfeiture of pay, and dismissal from the Army Murder (two counts), attempted murder, communicating a threat (two counts), reckless endangerment, witness tampering, obstruction of justice As a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army, Lorance was convicted of murdering two Afghans; he ordered his troops to shoot unarmed villagers, then made false reports as part of a cover-up attempt. Lorance was turned in by his own men and convicted at court-martial.[57] His cause was later championed by conservative members of Congress and Fox News personalities.[58]
February 18, 2020 Edward J. DeBartolo Jr. Middle District of Louisiana October 6, 1998 $250,000 dollar fine, two years of probation, payment of $350,000 restitution Misprision of felony DeBartolo, the former owner of the San Francisco 49ers, pleaded guilty in 1998 to concealing an extortion attempt; in 1997, he met former governor of Louisiana, Edwin Edwards, and gave him $400,000 in exchange for Edwards' help obtaining a license from the gaming board to allow Hollywood Casino Corp. (in which DeBartolo was an investor) to operate a riverboat casino.[59]
February 18, 2020 Michael Milken Southern District of New York November 21, 1990 $200 million fine; two years of prison; three years' supervised release; 5,400 hours of community service Conspiracy; securities fraud; mail fraud; tax fraud; filing false reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC); assisting a brokerage firm in violating its net capital requirements In pardoning financier Milken, Trump cited his charitable work after his release from prison. Milken's separate, SEC-imposed lifetime ban on securities trading continues.[60]
February 18, 2020 Angela Ronae Stanton (Angela Stanton-King) Northern District of Georgia May 24, 2007 Time served; three years' supervised release; six months' home confinement detention program Conspiracy to transport in interstate commerce a stolen motor vehicle and tampering with a vehicle identification number (VIN) (17 counts) Angela Stanton ran in the 2020 election as a Republican against Representative John Lewis[61] and then to fill his seat after Lewis's death.
February 18, 2020 Ariel Manuel Friedler Eastern District of Virginia August 8, 2014 Two months' imprisonment; one year's supervised release; $274,197.60 restitution to Maxient LLC; $217,097.60 due and payable immediately; and $250,000 fine due and payable immediately Conspiracy to access a protected computer without authorization The former CEO of an education software business, Friedler used the Tor network to mask his identity while he accessed his rivals' systems using those credentials to harvest their contacts database as well as snoop on their software design and features. Former New Jersey governor Chris Christie lobbied for Friedler's pardon.[62]
February 18, 2020 David Hossein Safavian District of Columbia October 27, 2006 72 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release Obstruction of justice and perjury (three counts) Safavian is a Republican former lawyer and long-time associate of lobbyist Jack Abramoff. Through much of his career, he alternated between government roles and Washington lobbyist roles, in what is known as the "revolving door". He was serving as Administrator for Federal Procurement Policy, Office of Management and Budget, when he was arrested in connection with the Jack Abramoff Indian lobbying scandal.
February 18, 2020 Paul Pogue United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas August 30, 2010 Three years' probation; $250,000 fine; and $473,604.09 restitution Making and subscribing a false tax return Pogue, the founder and executive of McKinney, Texas-based construction company Pogue Construction, pleaded guilty in 2010 for under-reporting his taxable income in 2004, 2005 and 2006,[63] failing to pay more than $400,000 taxes owed.[64] In 2019, Pogue's son Ben Pogue and daughter-in-law Ashleigh Pogue gave a total of $238,541 to Trump Victory, a vehicle for Trump's reelection campaign.[64] Former Republican senator Rick Santorum was a leading advocate for Pogue's pardon; Paul Pogue had been a contributor to Santorum's presidential election bid.[64][65]
February 18, 2020 Bernard Kerik Southern District of New York May 18, 2010 48 months' imprisonment; 3 years' supervised release; $187,931 restitution Obstructing the administration of the Internal Revenue Laws; aiding in the preparation of a false income tax return; making false statements on a loan application; making false statements (five counts) Kerik, the former New York City police commissioner, has been a contributor to Fox News.[59]
August 18, 2020 Susan B. Anthony Northern District of New York June 18, 1873 $100 fine and the cost of prosecution Illegal voting Anthony, a women's rights and women's suffrage activist, famously cast a ballot in the 1872 presidential election; prosecuted and convicted of violating the Enforcement Act of 1870; she never paid the fine. Trump posthumously pardoned Anthony on the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment.[66][67]
August 25, 2020 Jon Donyae Ponder District of Nevada December 27, 2005 63 months' imprisonment; 36 months' supervised release; $6,165 restitution Bank robbery; interference with commerce by armed robbery (six counts) Ponder, the founder of the group Hope for Prisoners, was pardoned by Trump in a videorecorded segment broadcast at the 2020 Republican National Convention.[68][69] The segment "provoked widespread criticism that Trump was abusing his office for purely partisan purposes."[70]
August 28, 2020 Alice Marie Johnson Western District of Tennessee March 21, 1997 Life sentence (previously commuted to time served) Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine; attempted possession of 12 kilos of cocaine with intent to distribute; attempted possession of 9 kilos of cocaine; attempted possession of 75 kilos of cocaine; attempted possession of 10 kilos of cocaine; conspiracy to commit money laundering; money laundering ($1.5 million); structuring monetary transactions Two years after Trump commuted Johnson's sentence (see below), he issued her a full pardon in August 2020.[71]
November 25, 2020 Michael T. Flynn District of Columbia N/A N/A – Flynn's pardon was issued after his conviction, but before his scheduled sentencing hearing. Making false statements to Federal investigators Flynn pleaded guilty to making false statements to the FBI in December 2017, during the Special Counsel investigation (2017–2019), but his sentencing was delayed.[72]
December 22, 2020 George Papadopoulos District of Columbia September 7, 2018 14 days in prison; 12 months of supervised release; 200 hours of community service; $9,500 fine Making false statements Papadopoulos was the first individual to be prosecuted in the Special Counsel investigation (2017–2019).[73]
December 22, 2020 Alex van der Zwaan District of Columbia April 3, 2018 30 days in federal prison; $20,000 fine; 2 months supervised release Making false statements A Dutch attorney, Van der Zwaan was prosecuted in under the Special Counsel investigation (2017–2019).[73]
December 22, 2020 Duncan D. Hunter Southern District of California March 17, 2020 11 months in federal prison Misusing campaign funds A former United States representative, Hunter was set to begin his sentence in January 2021.[73]
December 22, 2020 Christopher Carl Collins Southern District of New York January 17, 2020 26 months in federal prison Making false statements, conspiracy to commit securities fraud Collins is a former Republican congressman and a staunch Trump supporter; he pleaded guilty in 2019 to an insider trading scheme.[73][74] Collins' son Cameron Collins, who pleaded guilty to participating in the crime and was sentenced to probation, was not pardoned by Trump.[74]
December 22, 2020 Nicholas Abram Slatten District of Columbia August 14, 2019 Life sentence; three years' supervised release Murder in the first degree Slatten, Slough, Liberty, and Heard were four Blackwater contractors who opened fire in Nisoor Square in 2007, while guarding an American diplomat, killing at least 14 Iraqi civilians.[75] The pardons of the four men were condemned by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, which warned that the pardons undermined accountability for war crimes, and "expressed extreme concern that by permitting private security contractors to operate with impunity in armed conflicts, States would be encouraged to circumvent their humanitarian law obligations by outsourcing core military operations to the private sector."[76] Trump did npt pardon a fifth Blackwater guard, who pleaded guilty and cooperated with the prosecution.[74]
Paul Alvin Slough September 5, 2019 At least 144 months' imprisonment; 36 months' supervised release; fines Voluntary manslaughter; attempted voluntary manslaughter; using and discharging a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence and aiding and abetting and causing an act to be done
Evan Shawn Liberty
Dustin Laurent Heard
December 22, 2020 Ignacio Ramos Western District of Texas October 19, 2006 132 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $2,000 fine; sentence commuted in 2009 Assault with a dangerous weapon, assault with serious bodily injury, discharge of firearm in commission of a crime of violence, tampering with official proceedings and deprivation of rights under color of law. Ramos and Compean were Border Patrol Agents who attempted to subdue a drug smuggler in 2005. First physically hitting the individuals, then with service weapons. Upon the man's escape, they made efforts to cover up the crime and did not report it. Their sentences were commuted by President George W. Bush in 2009.[77]
Jose Compean 144 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $2,000 fine
December 22, 2020 Alfred Lee Crum United States District Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma May 19, 1952 18 months' imprisonment, suspended; three years' probation; $250 fine Illegally operating a still; unlawful possession of a still; operating without bond Crum's criminal convictions were the result of his distillation of moonshine. His request was supported by former deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein and the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Oklahoma Brian Kuester.[78]
December 22, 2020 Alfonso Antonio Costa Western District of Pennsylvania March 20, 2008 Three years' probation, conditioned upon one year's home confinement and 100 hours' community service; $250,000 fine; $44,579.47 restitution Health care fraud Costa, a former Pittsburgh dentist-turned-developer who became a friend and business partner of Ben Carson, Trump's Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, pleaded guilty to making fraudulent oral surgery claims; he was sentenced in 2008.[79][80]
December 22, 2020 Weldon Hal Angelos District of Utah November 16, 2004 660 months and one day's imprisonment (amended to time served); 36 months' supervised release Possession with intent to distribute marijuana (five counts); possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime (three counts); possession of a stolen firearm (two counts); possession of a firearm with a removed serial number; use of a controlled substance in possession of a firearm (two counts); money laundering (three counts) In 2004, Angelos, a music producer from Sandy, Utah, was sentenced to 55 years in prison for selling marijuana while carrying a gun, although he never used it. The sentence was a mandatory minimum; the sentencing judge, Paul G. Cassell, wrote a lengthy opinion calling the sentence that the court was compelling to oppose "unjust and cruel and even irrational" and urging then-President George W. Bush to commute the sentence. Angelos was released in 2016 after serving 12 years in prison, after a court granted early release on the government's motion.[81]
December 22, 2020 Phillip Kay Lyman District of Utah December 18, 2015 36 months' probation conditioned upon 10 days' incarceration; $1,000 fine; $95,955.61 restitution (December 18, 2015) Conspiracy to operate off-road vehicles on public land closed to off-road vehicles; operation of off-road vehicle on public lands closed to off-road vehicles Lyman, a Republican politician was a San Juan County, Utah, county commissioner at the time of the crime and a member of the Utah House of Representatives at the time of the pardon. He led an "ATV protest" in which about 50 ATV riders, seeking to challenge federal management of public lands, drove on the Recapture Canyon in a southeastern Utah, a site containing Native American cliff dwellings. The Bureau of Land Management had closed the area to motorized traffic. Lyman was convicted of misdemeanor trespassing in 2014 and sentenced in 2015. Upon Trump's grant of the pardon, the Trump White House issued a statement asserting that Lyman had been "subjected to selective prosecution."[82]
December 22, 2020 Otis Gordon District of South Carolina January 11, 1993 85 or 86 months' imprisonment (as amended); 48 months' supervised release Sell, distribute, or dispense a controlled substance [80]
December 23, 2020 Margaret E. Hunter Southern District of California August 24, 2020 Three years' probation conditioned upon eight months' home confinement Conspiracy to commit offenses Estranged wife of former U.S. Representative Duncan D. Hunter, whom Trump pardoned the previous day.[83] Trump's earlier pardon of the ex-congressman drew criticism from local officials and from the federal prosecutor on the case for omitting the ex-congressman's wife, who had pleaded guilty and cooperated with prosecutors.[74]
December 23, 2020 Charles Kushner District of New Jersey March 4, 2005 24 months in prison Tax evasion, witness tampering, and making illegal campaign donations Charles Kushner is a wealthy real estate executive and the father of Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law.[84][85][86] After Charles Kushner learned that his brother-in-law was cooperating with federal investigators, Kushner hired a prostitute to lure the man into a motel room with a hidden camera, and sent the recording of the subsequent encounter to the man's wife (Kushner's sister) to retaliate against him.[84][86] Then-U.S. Attorney Chris Christie called the case "one of the most loathsome, disgusting crimes" that he prosecuted.[84] Kushner pleaded guilty to 18 counts, including tax evasion, witness tampering, and violating federal contribution regulations.[84] He was sentenced to two years in prison (and ultimately ended up spending 14 months) and ordered to pay $508,900 to the FEC.[84][87] After being released, Kushner returned to his real estate businesses.[84]
December 23, 2020 Roger Stone District of Columbia February 20, 2020 40 months' imprisonment; 24 months' supervised release conditioned upon performance of 250 hours' community service; $20,000 fine Making false statements to Congress (five counts),
Witness tampering,
Obstructing an official proceeding
Trump pardoned Stone after commutating his sentence six months earlier.[85]
December 23, 2020 Paul J. Manafort (1) Eastern District of Virginia; (2) District of Columbia (1) March 7, 2019; (2) March 13, 2019 (1) 47 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $50,000 fine; $25,497,487.60 restitution (as amended by court order on March 21, 2019); (2) 73 months' imprisonment; 36 months' supervised release (concurrent); $6,164,032 restitution Five counts of tax fraud, two counts of bank fraud, and one count of failing to disclose a hidden foreign bank account; two counts of conspiracy Like Stone, Van der Zwaan, and Papadopoulos, Manafort was also prosecuted during the Special Counsel investigation (2017–2019).[83]
December 23, 2020 James J. Kassouf Northern District of Ohio December 6, 1999 One year's probation conditioned upon four months' home confinement; $10,000 fine; restitution in accordance with the plea agreement Making a false tax return [83]
December 23, 2020 Mary McCarty Southern District of Florida June 4, 2009 42 months' imprisonment; three years supervised release; $100,000 fine Conspiracy to commit honest services fraud McCarty was elected five times to the Palm Beach County, Florida county commission starting in 1990. In 2009, she pleaded guilty to honest services fraud for directing municipal bond-underwriting transactions to her husband Kevin McCarty (d. 2018) and other associates, and for accepting items of value from a company she supported for a Palm Beach County Convention Center hotel contract. McCarty served 21 months of her 3.5-year sentence.[88][83]
December 23, 2020 Christopher Wade Southern District of New York March 21, 2018 Sentence under seal (unknown) Sealed offenses of conviction The Trump White House said that Wade had been convicted of several "cyber-related offenses" and showed "remorse and sought to make his community a safer place."[83]
December 23, 2020 Christopher II X (Christopher Anthony Bryant) Eastern District of Arkansas February 4, 1985

January 20, 1987

Three years' imprisonment; five years probation (1985)

407 days imprisonment; five years probation (1987)

Conspiracy to distribute cocaine (1985)

Violation (1987)

A former cocaine offender, after his release, Christopher later became a prominent activist in Louisville, Kentucky, operating a youth nonprofit group. 2X was previously granted a full pardon for state crimes by then-Governor Matt Bevin. Supporters of 2X's request for federal executive clemency included Rand Paul and Tori Murden.[89]
Southern District of Indiana September 26, 1986 33 days imprisonment Violation
Western District of Kentucky May 23, 1990

February 20, 1992

Three years and 120 days imprisonment (1990)

508 days imprisonment (1992)

Violation
December 23, 2020 Cesar Agusto Lozada Southern District of Florida June 22, 2005 14 months imprisonment, three years supervised release Conspiracy to distribute marijuana[83]
December 23, 2020 Joseph Martin Stephens Western District of Texas June 13, 2012 18 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $2,500 fine Probation revocation In 2008, Stephens pleaded guilty in 2008 to being a felon in possession a firearm, having previously been convicted of a felony in 1991, when he was 19 years old.[83]
December 23, 2020 Andrew Barron Worden Southern District of New York October 9, 2009 Two years' probation conditioned upon 100 hours' community service per year and continued payment of balance owing to the Securities and Exchange Commission Wire fraud [83]
December 23, 2020 Robert Coughlin District of Columbia November 24, 2009 Time served; three years probation conditioned upon 30 days in a halfway house and 200 hours of community service; $2,000 fine Conflict of interest [83]
December 23, 2020 John Boultbee Northern District of Illinois February 10, 2011 329 days imprisonment (time already served); $500 fine, $15,000 restitution Mail fraud [83]
Peter Y. Atkinson December 10, 2007 345 days' imprisonment (time already served); three years' supervised release; $3,000 fine (as amended April 4, 2011)
December 23, 2020 Joseph Occhipinti Southern District of New York October 18, 1991 37 months' imprisonment (commuted to time served on January 15, 1993); two years' supervised release Conspiracy to violate civil rights; deprivation of rights under color of law (10 misdemeanor counts); false statements (six counts) Occhipinti, a former INS agent, was convicted of crimes related to the illegally detention and searches of Hispanic store owners in New York City and a subsequent cover-up effort. After he spent seven months in prison, his sentence was commuted by President George H. W. Bush in 1991.[83]
December 23, 2020 Rebekah Kay Charleston Eastern District of Texas January 10, 2007 13 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $1,000 fine Conspiracy to commit tax evasion Arrested in 2006 for tax evasion, Charleston later became an advocate for the victims of sex trafficking.[83]
December 23, 2020 Rickey Ivan Kanter Eastern District of Wisconsin September 15, 2011 12 months and one day's imprisonment; two years' supervised release; $50,000 fine Mail fraud Kanter, the founder of the "Dr. Comfort" diabetic shoe company, was convicted of mail fraud in connection with an illegal Medicare reimbursement scheme. In addition to the criminal penalty, Kanter paid a multimillion-dollar civil penalty.[83]
December 23, 2020 Topeka Kimberly Sam Eastern District of Virginia January 11, 2013 52 months' imprisonment (as amended by the Bureau of Prisons pursuant to court orders on March 5, 2014, and November 2, 2015); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine hydrochloride Sam served three years of her sentence. She is a criminal justice reform advocate who pushed for enactment of the First Step Act.[83]
December 23, 2020 James Harutun Batmasian Southern District of Florida July 11, 2008 Eight months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release Willful failure to pay over tax Batmasian, a South Florida real-estate investor and property management businessman influential in Boca Raton, pleaded guilty to failing to pay more than quarter-million in payroll tax owed.[83][88]
December 23, 2020 William Plemons United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia July 1, 1998 12 months imprisonment; three years supervised release; $20,000 fine Structuring transactions to avoid reporting requirements (four counts) [83]
August 26, 1999 27 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release Willfully attempting to evade personal income tax (three counts)
May 29, 2002 27 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release; $1,100,000 restitution Wire fraud
December 23, 2020 Russell Plaisance Western District of Louisiana November 18, 1987 Three years imprisonment; three years probation; three years special parole Conspiracy to unlawfully import cocaine into the U.S. Posthumous pardon.[83]
December 23, 2020 Mark Siljander Western District of Missouri January 12, 2012 12 months and one day's imprisonment; six months' supervised release Obstruction of justice; acting as an unregistered foreign agent Siljander was a Republican congressman from 1981 to 1987, from a southwestern Michigan district. He pleaded guilty in 2010 to acting as an unregistered foreign agent in connection with his work for Islamic American Relief Agency, which hired him in early 2004 to lobby to get the organization removed from a list of Senate committee list of entities suspected of providing funding for terrorism. Siljander also pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice; prosecutors stated that he had falsely claimed payments from IARA were charitable donations. IARA closed in October 2004 after it was added to the Treasury Department's list of global terrorist organizations due to the group's links to Osama bin Laden, al-Qaida and the Taliban. Siljander was never charged with terrorism. In issuing the pardon, the Trump White House cited Siljander's anti-abortion record while a congressman and his post-prison work abroad. Trump's decision to pardon Siljander was criticized by Republican congressman Fred Upton, who succeeded Siljander after defeating him in the 1986 Republican primary.[90]
December 23, 2020 Stephanie Christine Mohr District of Maryland December 11, 2001 120 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release Deprivation of rights under color of law Mohr, a former Prince George's County, Maryland police officer and police dog handler, was convicted in 2001 of criminal deprivation of rights under color of law for directing her police dog to attack a homeless man, causing a serious leg injury. She served 10 years in prison.[83] After Trump issued the pardon, the Washington Post published an op-ed by Alex Busansky, a member of the Justice Department Civil Rights Division team who prosecuted the case in 2001, who criticized the pardon as "odious" and wrote that it showed "the president's disdain, not just for the victims of police abuse, but for honest law enforcement officers who follow their training, see the humanity in all people, and do their job with respect and decency."[91]
December 23, 2020 Gary Mark Brugman Western District of Texas March 10, 2003 27 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release Deprivation of rights under color of law Brugman, a former U.S. Border Patrol agent, was convicted in 2002 of violating the civil rights of a man attempting to cross the border from Mexico into Texas. Court records showed that in January 2001, Brugman struck two men who were not resisting. Brugman denied wrongdoing, and his case became a cause célèbre among conservative figures.[92]
December 23, 2020 John Frederick Tate Southern District of Iowa September 20, 2016 Two years' probation conditioned upon six months' home confinement and 160 hours' community service; $10,000 fine Conspiracy to commit an offense against the United States; causing false records; causing false campaign contribution reports; false statements scheme Benton and Tate were Ron Paul's campaign chairman and campaign manager, respectively, during Paul's unsuccessful 2012 campaign for the Republican presidential nomination. They were convicted at trial of concealing payments of $73,000 to state Senator Kent Sorenson in exchange for Sorenson's switching of his endorsement from Michele Bachmann to Paul ahead of the Iowa caucus. (The payments were disguised as "audio/visual expenses"). Senior U.S. District Judge Robert Pratt (who oversaw the criminal case against Sorenson) ridiculed Trump's pardon, saying, "It's not surprising that a criminal like Trump pardons other criminals."[93]
Jesse R. Benton Two years' probation conditioned upon six months' home confinement and 160 hours' community service; $10,000 fine (September 20, 2016)
January 13, 2021 Lynn Wade Barney District of Utah September 14, 2005 35 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release Possession of a firearm and ammunition by a convicted felon Barney, of Enoch, Utah, was sentenced to 35 months in prison for being a felon in possession of a firearm (he had previously been convicted of a felony for marijuana distribution). He was released several years before the pardon.[94]
January 13, 2021 Paul L. Behrens Middle District of Florida May 19, 2014 24 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release Making false statements relating to health care matters (two counts); health care fraud (two counts) Behrens, a former chief financial officer of Tampa, Florida-based WellCare Health Plans, pleaded guilty to a charge involving a false statement in connection with a scheme to defraud Medicaid.[95]
January 13, 2021 Thaddeus M. S. Bereday Middle District of Florida November 22, 2017 Six months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release, conditioned upon 12 months' home detention; $50,000 fine Making false statements relating to health care matters Bereday is the former general counsel of Tampa, Florida-based WellCare Health Plans; he was convicted in 2013 of fraud and making false statements in connection with a scheme to defraud Medicaid.[95]
January 13, 2021 Peter E. Clay Middle District of Florida May 19, 2014 60 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon 200 hours' community service; $10,000 fine Making false statements (two counts) Clay is a former vice president of Tampa, Florida-based WellCare Health Plans; he was convicted in 2013 of fraud and making false statements in connection with a scheme to defraud Medicaid.[95]
January 13, 2021 Scott Conor Crosby District of Arizona May 24, 1993 60 months and two days' imprisonment; three years' supervised release Bank robbery; use of a firearm during crime of violence Along with a co-worker, Crosby committed a bank robbery in Arizona in 1992, at the age of 20. He spent five years in prison. After his release, he had a clean record, and became an emergency medical technician and a Mesa business operator.[96]
January 13, 2021 Randall Harold "Duke" Cunningham United States District Court for the Southern District of California March 3, 2006 100 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $1,804,031.50 restitution Conspiracy to commit crimes against the United States; tax evasion Cunningham, a former seven-term Republican congressman from a San Diego, California-based district, pleaded guilty in 2005 to conspiracy and tax evasion for taking $2 million in bribes from defense contractors in exchange for federal contracts, possibly the largest bribery scandal in the history of the U.S. Congress (see Cunningham scandal). He served eight years in federal prison, and lived in Arkansas after his release.[97] Cunningham kept a "bribe menu" on congressional stationery listing the payments military contractors should make to him in exchange for his help securing government contracts.[98] The pardon is conditional and preserves Cunningham's court-ordered obligation to pay off the $3.6 million in restitution and forfeiture.[97] Trump's pardon of Cunningham was condemned by the federal prosecutors who led the case, as well as others.[97]
January 13, 2021 Paul Erickson District of South Dakota July 6, 2020 84 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $2,976,937 restitution Wire fraud; money laundering Erickson, a Republican political operative, pleaded guilty to charges of wire fraud and money laundering; court records stated that he was part of schemes that bilked $5.3 million from 78 investors from 1996 to 2018, including a scheme involving fake housing in the Baaken oil fields in North Dakota. Erickson told investors that they would receive returns of up to 150%; he spent the money received from the scheme on personal expenses, including for Maria Butina, to whom Erickson was romantically linked. Butina was later revealed to be a Russian agent. Erickson was sentenced to seven years in prison, and was serving his sentence at the time Trump pardoned him. In issuing the pardon, Trump's White House asserted that Erickson had committed only a "minor financial crime." Trump's aide Kellyanne Conway advocated for the pardon.[99]
January 20, 2021 Todd S. Farha Middle District of Florida May 19, 2014 36 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release; $50,000 fine Health care fraud (two counts) Farha is the former president and CEO of Tampa, Florida-based WellCare Health Plans; he was convicted in 2013 of fraud and making false statements in connection with a scheme to defraud Medicaid.[95]
January 13, 2021 Thomas K. (Ken) Ford Middle District of Illinois April 10, 2003 Three years' probation; $2,000 fine Violating mandatory safety standards; making false material statements and representations Ford, who pleaded guilty in 2003 to making false statements to federal mining regulators, later became an executive at a Western Kentucky coal company.[100]
January 13, 2021 Jessica Jean Frease aka Jessica Jean Armstrong District of South Dakota December 3, 2012 16 months' imprisonment (as amended); five years' supervised release; $3,300 restitution Bank embezzlement
January 13, 2021 Robert Cannon Hayes Western District of North Carolina August 19, 2020 One year's probation; $9,500 fine False statements Hayes, a former Republican congressman from North Carolina (1999–2009) and former chairman of the North Carolina Republican Party, pleaded guilty in 2019 to lying to the FBI regarding a scheme by Greg Lindberg, billionaire insurance businessman and political donor, to bribe Insurance Commission Mike Causey. In addition to Hayes, Lindberg and two of his associated were charged. Causey, who contacted law enforcement authorities and helped them investigate, was never accused of wrongdoing.[101]
January 13, 2021 Gregory L. Jorgensen District of South Dakota July 3, 1996 (Deborah and Gregory); July 3, 2003 (Gregory) Deborah: 12 months and one day of imprisonment; two years' supervised release; $20,000 fine; Gregory: 24 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release; $40,000 fine; Martin: 15 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release; $40,000 fine Deborah and Gregory: Conspiracy; misbranding (10 counts); wire fraud (three counts); mail fraud (two counts); Martin: Conspiracy; misbranding (10 counts) Gregory, Deborah, and Martin Jorgensen were South Dakotan who in 1996 were convicted of knowingly selling misbranded beef. Gregory Jorgensen was subsequently elected to the Tripp County Board of Commissioners. Martin Jorgensen's pardon was posthumous.[102]
  • Deborah L. Jorgensen
  • Martin Frederick Jorgensen
January 13, 2021 William L. Kale Middle District of Florida May 19, 2014 12 months and one day's imprisonment; one year's supervised release Health care fraud (two counts) Kale is the former vice president of Tampa, Florida-based WellCare Health Plans; he was convicted in 2013 of fraud and making false statements in connection with a scheme to defraud Medicaid.[95]
January 13, 2021 Frederick J. Nahas District of New Jersey January 2, 2003 One month's imprisonment; three years' supervised release; and a $20,000 fine Obstruction of justice in a health care investigation Nahas, a surgeon from Somers Point, New Jersey, pleaded guilty in 2002 to obstruction of justice in connection with his concealment of documents that had been subpoenaed in a investigation. He spent one month in prison in 2003, and was also sentenced to two months of weekend confinement in a halfway house, three months of home confinement, and a fine of $20,000. Nahas's pardon was supported by Republican congressman Jeff Van Drew, to whose campaign Nahas had donated $3,000.[103]
January 13, 2021 John Michael Nystrom District of South Dakota July 20, 2009 Two years' probation, conditioned upon 100 hours' community service; $5,000 fine; $20,514.64 restitution Misprison of a felony
January 13, 2021 Amy Ralston Povah Western District of Texas February 27, 1992 292 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; a $10,000 fine Conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance; conspiracy to import a controlled substance; money laundering Povah served 9 years of a 24-year sentence for ecstasy offenses. Her sentence was commuted in 2000 by President Bill Clinton before her 2021 pardon from Trump. After her release, she founded the CAN-DO Foundation (Calling for All Nonviolent Drug Offenders) Foundation, a criminal justice reform organization.[104]
January 13, 2021 David Francis Rowland District of South Carolina January 29, 1997 Two years' probation Federal enforcement procedures (two counts)
January 13, 2021 Joshua James Smith Middle District of Tennessee August 27, 1998 60 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $12,500 fine Conspiracy to possess and distribute marijuana; conspiracy to possess and distribute cocaine
January 13, 2021 David Tamman Central District of California September 23, 2013 84 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; and a $2,500 fine Conspiracy to obstruct justice; destruction, alteration, falsification of records, aiding and abetting, causing an act to be done; accessory after the fact; obstruction of justice, aiding and abetting Tamman, a former partner at the law firms Nixon Peabody and Greenberg Traurig, was convicted of 2012 for conspiring with a client to obstruct a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission investigation into a $22 million Ponzi scheme. Tamman was fired by the law firms and disbarred by the State Bar of California in 2016. Alan Dershowitz, who was one of Trump's lawyers, represented Tamman in his unsuccessful appeal. Convicted in 2012, Tamman was released from prison in February 2019. His pardon was supported by the Aleph Institute, which was influential in Trump's clemency decisionmaking; the Trump White House also stated that former FBI director Louis Freeh and former federal prosecutor Kendall Coffey supported the pardon.[105]
January 19, 2021 Alex Adjmi (1) District of Connecticut; (2) Eastern District of New York (1) November 7, 1996; (2) June 22, 1998 (1) 48 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release, conditioned upon 600 hours' community service; $125,000 fine; (2) Three years' supervised release (concurrent); $15,000 fine; $4,500 restitution (as amended) (1) Money laundering; (2) Conspiracy to commit insurance fraud
January 19, 2021 Fred Keith Alford Northern District of Oklahoma January 17, 1977 Firearms violation (interstate sale of firearm by federal firearms licensee) One year of unsupervised probation
January 19, 2021 Mahmoud Reza Banki Southern District of New York May 5, 2014 $5,000 fine False statements (two counts, as amended on appeal) In 2010, Banki, a Iran-born naturalized U.S. citizen, was sentenced to 30 months' imprisonment for violating U.S. sanctions laws by transferring about $3.3 million between Iran and the United States through the hawala system. He served 665 days before being released, after his sanctions conviction was vacated on appeal (his conviction for making a false statement was upheld). In announcing the pardon, the Trump White House cited Banki's doctorate from Princeton University, his community work and "sincere love and respect for the United States" and support from Senator Dianne Feinstein, Representative John Lewis, and others.[106]
January 19, 2021 Stephen Bannon Southern District of New York N/A N/A Conspiracy to commit wire fraud; conspiracy to commit money laundering Trump pardoned Bannon, a former top 2016 campaign advisor to Trump and his former White House chief strategist, after Bannon was arrested and indicted in August 2020 on charges of misappropriating money donated to the "We Build the Wall" organization for personal expenses. Bannon had pleaded not guilty and had not yet been brought to trial when Trump issued the pardon. Bannon and Trump had a strained relationship after Bannon left the White House in August 2017; Bannon had criticized Trump's son, and Trump responded by publicly disparaging Bannon. But Bannon returned to Trump's favor after he supported Trump's failed relection campaign and Trump's efforts to overturn the election.[107] Trump did not pardon Bannon's co-defendants: Brian Kolfage, Andrew Badolato, and Timothy Shea, all of whom pleaded not guilty.[74]
January 19, 2021 Faustino Bernadett Central District of California January 17, 2020 15 months' imprisonment (surrender ordered February 26, 2021); one year's supervised release; $60,000 fine Misprison of a felony Bernadett, a physician and former owner of the Pacific Hospital in Long Beach, California, pleaded guilty in 2019 to failing to report a years-long health care fraud that scammed the California worker's compensation system of millions of dollars. Bernadett was sentenced to 15 months in federal prison; he was pardoned before he served prison time, which had been delayed due to his poor health and the COVID-19 pandemic. In announcing the pardon, the Trump White House referred to Bernadett's charitable work and noted that he did not initiate the kickback scheme.[108]
January 19, 2021 Carl Andrew Boggs, III Western District of North Carolina November 23, 2015 30 months in prison, two years of supervised release and $15,000 fine Conspiracy to defraud the United States Department of Transportation and money laundering His paving business, Boggs Paving Inc,, accepted a contract with South Carolina Department of Transportation to widen Interstate 26 through Lexington and Calhoun counties in 2013. Following the mismanaged project, Boggs and four of his employees were convicted of crimes related to the use of a disadvantaged business enterprise to obtain $88 million in government contracts.[109][110][111]
January 19, 2021 Todd A. Boulanger District of Columbia October 14, 2011 30 days' imprisonment; 24 months' supervised release; $4,000 fine Conspiracy to commit honest services wire fraud
January 19, 2021 Robert Douglas Bowker Middle District of Florida March 19, 1993 Two years' probation Wildlife smuggling Bowker, of New York, was convicted of 1993 was convicted of wildlife trafficking for illegally arranging the delivery of 22 Timber rattlesnakes to the Miami Serpentarium (a tourist attraction in South Florida) in an swap with Rudy "Cobra King" Komarek for 22 American alligators. He was sentenced to two years' probation.[112]
January 19, 2021 Elliott Broidy District of Columbia N/A N/A Conspiracy to serve as an unregistered agent of a foreign principal Broidy, a California businessman and Republican fundraiser, was a major donor to Trump's 2016 presidential campaign and Trump's inauguration, and was also a deputy finance chairman for the Republican National Committee. He pleaded guilty in October 2020 to conspiring to violate foreign lobbying laws by accepting $9 million from Jho Low, a fugitive Malaysian businessman, in order to influence the Trump administration's Justice Department to drop its investigation into fraud and embezzlement at the Malaysian sovereign wealth fund 1MDB (see 1Malaysia Development Berhad scandal), and by seeking to extradite wealthy Chinese dissident Guo Wengui from the United States as part of a bid to get payoffs from China and the United Arab Emirates. As part of his guilty plea, Broidy admitted that he knowingly failed to register as a foreign agent and agreed to forfeit $6.6 million. Broidy faced a sentencing hearing in February 2021 before Trump pardoned him on his last day in office.[113]
January 19, 2021 Drew Kallman "Bo" Brownstein Southern District of New York January 11, 2012 One year and one day of imprisonment; three years' supervised release, conditioned on 500 hours' community service; $7,500 fine Securities fraud (insider trading) Brownstein, a hedge fund operator and son of prominent Denver, Colorado attorney and lobbyist Norman Brownstein, pleaded guilty in 2012 to insider trading. His company made a $2.44 million profit from an trade in energy companies that he made after learning about a pending corporate acquisition from a friend.[114]
January 19, 2021 Tommaso Buti Southern District of New York N/A N/A Conspiracy to defraud the United States; fraud by wire, radio, or television (35 counts); scheme to defraud: money, state tax stamps (transportation of stolen property (14 counts); money laundering - racketeering (laundering monetary instruments conspiracy) Buti, a prominent restaurateur, had partnered with Trump in the late 1990s on Trump Management, a modeling agency. He was subsequently investigated on allegations of stealing from his chain of restaurants, and was indicted in 2000. Buti denied wrongdoing and was tried and acquitted on similar charges in his native Italy. He was never extradited to New York to stand trial on the U.S. charges, and Trump's pardon terminated the still-open case against him.[115]
January 19, 2021 Dwayne Michael Carter Jr. (Lil Wayne) Southern District of Florida N/A N/A Possession of firearm and ammunition by a convicted felon Carter, a rapper who performs under the name Lil Wayne, pleaded guilty in December 2020 to being a felon in possession of a firearm (specifically, a gold-plated .45-caliber Glock).[107]
January 19, 2021 Robert William Cawthon Northern District of Texas May 22, 1992 Three years' probation, conditioned upon 180 days' home confinement False statement on bank loan application
January 19, 2021 David Lamar Clanton Northern District of Mississippi September 20, 1995 10 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $123,398.31 restitution False, fictitious, or fraudulent claims; aiding and abetting in making false, fictitious, and fraudulent statements and representations
January 19, 2021 Jeffrey Alan Conway Western District of Pennsylvania November 25, 2003 13 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release; $20,000 fine Conspiracy to commit offenses against the United States Conway was the chief financial officer of Rent-Way Inc., a rental purchase chain. In 2003, he pleaded guilty to conspiracy to falsify accounting records, and was released from prison the next year. He subsequently became a restaurateur based in Charlotte, North Carolina.[111]
January 19, 2021 Robert S. Corkern Northern District of Mississippi November 13, 2012 3 years of supervised release Aiding and abetting in bribery involving federal programs In 2007 Corkern paid $25,000 to a Panola County administrator to secure a $400,000 payment to the Tri-Lakes Medical Center to which Corkern's business, Batesville Hospital Management, provided services. The Trump White House press release said that the pardon was supported by Republican U.S. Senators Roger Wicker and Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi; and Phil Bryant, the Republican former governor of Mississippi.[116][117]
January 19, 2021 Steven Benjamin Floyd Southern District of Mississippi January 3, 2008 30 months (the last six to be served in a halfway house); three years' supervised release; $2,500 fine Bank robbery by extortion
January 19, 2021 Duncan Fordham Southern District of Georgia September 15, 2005 52 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $1,021,888 restitution Health care fraud Fordham was an Augusta, Georgia pharmacist convicted in 2005 of his involvement in a health care fraud scheme. Under the scheme, Fordham would obtain contracts to operate the pharmacy of Community Mental Health Center of East Central Georgia, and then give a third of his large bonus in kickbacks to former State Representative Robin L. Williams.[118]
January 19, 2021 Clarence Olin Freeman District of South Carolina October 29, 1965 Conspiracy to violate interstate revenue laws; dealing in illegal whiskey; possession of illegal whiskey Nine months' imprisonment; five years' probation
January 19, 2021 George Gilmore District of New Jersey January 22, 2020 12 months and one day's imprisonment; three years' supervised release Two counts of failing to pay payroll taxes to the IRS and one count of making false statements on a bank loan application Gilmore was the former chairman of the Ocean County, New Jersey Republican Party, and a power broker in New Jersey Republican politics. He was convicted by a jury in 2019, but maintained that he was innocent and contended that his failure to make timely payments owed to the IRS was attributable to a hoarding disorder. He was sentenced in 2020, but was free on bail pending the appeal. Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager and a longtime associate of Gilmore's, lobbied for the pardon, which was supported by other influential New Jersey figures, such as Chris Christie, Jim McGreevey, Jim Florio, Donald DiFrancesco, Kim Guadagno, and Tom MacArthur.[119]
January 19, 2021 Steven Samuel Grantham Central District of California June 13, 1967 Four months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release Interstate transportation of a stolen vehicle
January 19, 2021 Joey Murray Hancock Northern District of Mississippi February 16, 2010 24 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute in excess of 50 grams of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine
January 19, 2021 Wesley Scott Harkonen, Jr. Northern District of California April 13, 2011 Three years' probation, conditioned upon six months' home confinement and 200 hours' community service; $20,000 fine (as amended) Wire fraud and aiding and abetting
January 19, 2021 James Austin Hayes, IV Western District of North Carolina January 28, 2014 One year's probation Insider trading conspiracy Hayes was one of several people convicted of particiting in an insider trading ring that operated between 2010 and 2012 led by a Wells Fargo employee who disclosed confidential information about impending mergers.[120]
January 19, 2021 Gary E. Hendler Eastern District of North Carolina October 30, 1984 Three years' probation Conspiracy to distribute and dispense methaqualone
January 19, 2021 William E. "Ed" Henry Middle District of Alabama May 2, 2019 Two years' probation; $4,000 fine Theft of government property Henry was a former Republican member of the Alabama House of Representatives. He pleaded guilty in January 2019 to aiding and abetting theft of government property in connection with his involvement in a Medicare fraud scheme. Alabama's Republican U.S. Senator, Tommy Tuberville, supported the pardon.[121]
January 19, 2021 Abel Holtz Southern District of Florida January 20, 1995 45 days' imprisonment; two years' supervised release, conditioned upon an unspecified term of home confinement and community service; $20,000 fine (as amended) Obstruction of justice Holtz, an influential Miami, Florida banker and philanthropist who founded Capital Bank, pleaded guilty in October 1994 to lying to a federal grand jury about paying tens of thousands of dollars in bribes to Alex Daoud, a corrupt city commissioner (and later mayor) of Miami Beach. Holtz's previous 2006 pardon application was denied by President George W. Bush.[122]
January 19, 2021 Douglas Jemal District of Columbia April 16, 2007 Five years' probation; $175,000 fine Wire fraud Jemal, age 79 at the time of the pardon, was an influential Washington, D.C., real estate developer who was convicted of wire fraud in 2006 in connection with an efforts to influence a local government official to obtain profitable government leases. Jemal's leasing chief and two other employees were also convicted on varying charges. Jemal has been a major political donor to both parties over the years, and is a friend of Jared Kushner; he donated $100,000 to the [[Republican National Committee] in 2020. In issuing the pardon, the White House referred to Jemal's charitable work and said he was "credited with rebuilding many urban inner cities." Trump did not grant pardons to Jemal's underlings; this was criticized by the lead prosecutor on the case, who said that the subordinates were "far less culpable" than Jemal and that the pardon sent a message "that there are two standards of accountability: One for the wealthy and well-connected, and one for everyone else."[123]
January 19, 2021 James E. Johnson Jr. Eastern District of North Carolina March 11, 2008 One year's probation; $7,500 fine Hunting over bait and aiding and abetting the same; killing migratory game bird without retaining in actual custody Johnson, of Virginia, unlawfully baited and killed migratory birds in Pamlico County, North Carolina, in 2007, and pleaded guilty to the offense the following year.[111]
January 19, 2021 Amir B. Khan District of Hawaii August 26, 2019 Three years' probation, conditioned upon 360 days' home detention, 1,500 hours' community service, and $6,500 restitution Wire fraud (19 counts)
January 19, 2021 Kenneth Kurson aka Jayden Wagner, Eddie Train Eastern District of New York N/A N/A Interstate stalking and harassment Kurson, an ally of the Trump family, was appointed the editor-in-chief of the The New York Observer in 2013 by Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner, who at the time owned the newspaper. Kurson and Kushner became close friends. Kurson also wrote a speech for Trump in his 2016 campaign, and was a longtime associate of Rudolph W. Giuliani, Trump's lawyer. In October 2020, Kurson was charged with cyberstalking three people and harassing two other people.[124] He was pardoned on the last full day of Trump's term, before he could stand trial.[125]
January 19, 2021 Anthony Scott Levandowski Northern District of California August 4, 2020 18 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $95,000 fine; $756,499.22 restitution Theft and attempted theft of trade secrets Levandowski, age 40 at the time of the pardon, stole trade secrets from Google's autonomous vehicle company Waymo, where he was an engineer, after he had left the company and was negotiating a position at Uber; Levandowski pleaded guilty as part of a plea deal, and was sentenced in August 2020 to 18 months' imprisonment. Levandowski's request for a pardon was supported by billionaire Trump ally Peter Thiel. as well as others.[126]
January 19, 2021 Michael A. Liberty District of Maine August 9, 2017 Four months' imprisonment; one year's supervised release; $100,000 fine Political contributions in the names of others and aiding and abetting Liberty is a former Maine developer who pleaded guilty in 2016 to unlawfully donating $22,500 in 2011 to the primary campaign of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in violation of the federal campaign contribution limit ($2,500). He was sentenced to four months' imprisonment, one year of supervised release, and $100,000 fine, and was released from federal prison in 2018. In subsequent years, he donated to Republican organizations and Trump's campaign. A federal grand jury in 2019 indicted him and an associate on charges of scamming $50 million from investors; they have pleaded not guilty. At the time of the pardon, Liberty was living in Florida.[127]
January 19, 2021 Brian Lyle McSwain District of South Carolina May 7, 1993 (as amended June 7 and June 19, 1994) 18 months' imprisonment, including approximately four months' community confinement; three years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and to distribute marijuana and cocaine McSwain was a Greenville, South Carolina police officer who pleaded guilty in 1993 to involvement in a cocaine trafficking conspiracy, in which he was one of 26 co-defendants, including Richard Riley Jr., the son of former South Carolina Govenor Dick Riley. U.S. Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina sought the pardon for McSwain.[128]
January 19, 2021 Hal Knudson Mergler Northern District of West Virginia July 21, 1992 (as amended November 19, 1993) One month of imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $505 restitution Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and to distribute LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide)
January 19, 2021 David Eugene Miller Middle District of Tennessee November 19, 2012 30 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release Making a false statement to a bank (as amended)
January 19, 2021 Glen Moss District of Connecticut June 9, 2000 Three years' probation, conditioned upon cooperation with the IRS in resolving $100,000 in unpaid taxes for the years 1991 and 1992; $4,000 fine Payment to non-licensed physician; attempt to evade or defeat tax Moss, a member of the Trump's golf club in Westchester County, New York, was listed as donating $10,000 to the Trump Foundation in 2008. Trump pardoned him for his involvement in a health-care fraud scheme.[115]
January 19, 2021 Hillel "Helly" Nahmad Southern District of New York April 30, 2014 One year and one day's imprisonment; three years' supervised release, conditioned upon 300 hours' community service; $30,000 fine (April 30, 2014) Illegal gambling Helly Nahmad is a Madison Avenue art dealer who is a member of the wealthy Nahmad family and son of the noted art collector David Nahmad. The younger Nahmad owns the entirety of Trump Tower's 51st floor, reportedly purchased at the cost of $21 million. He pleaded guilty to organizing an illegal $100 million gambling ring with suspected links to Russian organized crime out of Trump Tower. His art gallery in New York's Carlyle Hotel was raided by federal agents in 2013; Nahmad later pleaded guilty and was sentenced in 2014. He was also ordered to forfeit $6.4 million in earnings.Alimzhan Tokhtakhunov was indicted in connection with the case, but was never arrested.[129]
January 19, 2021 Stephen Odzer aka Harold J. Odzer Eastern District of New York May 3, 2007 18 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $16,150,017.83 restitution (as amended on June 5, 2007) Bank fraud Odzer pleaded guilty of defrauding three banks of $16 million but cooperated as a witness in another case.[130]
January 19, 2021 Benedict Guthrie Olberding District of South Carolina April 11, 2013 Five years' probation; $614,154.37 restitution Bank fraud Olberding was a mortgage broker in North Carolina who, with along with a co-defendent, arranged loans with financial institutions between 2007 and 2009 with fraudulant information.[131]
January 19, 2021 Eric Wesley Patton Eastern District of Tennessee February 23, 1999 $1,000 fine Making false statement
January 19, 2021 Desiree Perez fka Desiree Reynoso Southern District of Florida (1) September 7, 1995; (2) April 6, 1999 (1) Five years' probation (as amended); (2) Nine months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release (1) Conspiracy to distribute cocaine; (2) Probation violation Perez is the CEO of Roc Nation; she was convicted of a drug crime in the 1990s.[132]
January 19, 2021 Johnny D. Phillips Jr. Eastern District of Tennessee November 2, 2016 30 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $14,092,205.04 restitution (as amended) Conspiracy to commit wire fraud and mail fraud
January 19, 2021 Richard George (Rick) Renzi Southern District of Arizona October 28, 2013 36 months' imprisonment; three years supervised release; $25,000 fine Conspiracy to commit extortion, attempted extortion and wire and mail fraud; honest wire services wire fraud (six counts); conspiracy to commit money laundering; concealment of money laundering; transactions with criminally derived funds (two counts); extortion under color of official right (two counts); conspiracy to make false statement; insurance fraud (two counts); racketeering Renzi, a former Republican congressman from 2003 to 2009 from a northeastern Arizona district, was convicted in 2013 on 17 federal counts, including racketeering, money laundering, extortion, and filing false statements with regulators. He served three years in prison and was released in 2017. Renzi denied wrongdoing and insisted that the prosecution was politically motivated.[133]
January 19, 2021 Gregory Louis Reyes Northern District of California June 24, 2010 18 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release; $15 million fine Conspiracy to commit securities and mail fraud; fraud in connection with Brocade stock, aiding, abetting and willfully causing; false SEC filing, aiding, abetting and willfully causing (three counts); falsifying books, records and accounts, aiding, abetting and willfully causing; false statement to accountant, aiding, abetting and willfully causing (four counts) Reyes was the first person to be convicted of an offense related to options backdating. As CEO of Brocade Communications Systems, he falsified financial records and made false statements to accountants between 2000 and 2004 regarding stock option compensation.[134]
January 20, 2021 Aviem Sella Northern District of Columbia N/A N/A Espionage - conspiracy to gather or deliver national defense information (two counts); violation of Subversive Activities Control Act - receiving or obtaining classified information by foreign agent Sella was an Israeli Air Force officer and Mossad operative who recruited and handled Jonathan Pollard, an American naval intelligence analyst who spied for Israel. Shortly before Pollard was arrested, Sella fled the U.S. He was indicted for espionage in 1987, but was never extradited to stand trial. The Trump White House said that Sella's petition for a pardon was requested by the Israel government and supported by Miriam Adelson, the wife of conservative mega-donor Sheldon Adelson.[135]
January 19, 2021 Robert C. Sherrill Middle District of Tennessee July 27, 2009 50 months' imprisonment; four years' supervised release Cocaine distribution Sherrill served five years in federal prison for cocaine distribution; after his release, he became a Nashville, Tennessee businessman, entrepreneur, non-profit founder, and author. Sherrill was previously pardoned in 2019 by Governor Bill Haslam. His pardon was supported by congressman Mark E. Green.[136]
January 19, 2021 Syrita Rashida Steib-Martin Eastern District of Texas July 24, 2000 120 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $1,934,169.31 restitution Use of fire to commit a felony In 2000, Steib was convicted for her involvement in an auto theft that culminated in the burning of a Tyler, Texas car dealership; she was released from prison in 2009 after serving nine years.[137]
January 19, 2021 Patrick Lee Swisher Western District of North Carolina October 15, 2002 30 months' imprisonment; two years' supervised release; $5,000 fine Fraudulent tax return/statement and making false statements Swisher, the founder of Swisher Hygiene, was convicting of failing to report $1.9 million in stock sales on his 1996 and 1997 tax returns.[111]
January 19, 2021 Casey Urlacher Northern District of Illinois N/A N/A Conspiracy to defraud the United States; illegal gambling; money laundering Casey Urlacher is the mayor of Mettawa, Illinois, and the younger brother of former Chicago Bears player Brian Urlacher, who visited the Trump White House in March 2020 and contributed to Republican and Trump's campaigns and Republican organizations. In February 2020, Casey Urlacher was indicted on two counts of conspiring to engage in illegal offshore gambling in connection with his recruitment of bettors for a Costa Rica-based website in exchange for a cut of the proceeds. Urlacher was one of 10 people charged in the federal grand jury indictment; none of the others received pardons. The Republican leader in the Illinois State Senate, Dan McConchie, who defeated Urlacher in a 2016 primary election, criticized the pardon of an indicted defendant who had not yet been convicted, saying: "Pardons should be done on the merits of the case, not based on a relationship with the President. This sort of practice undermines the public's faith in our system. We're supposed to be a nation of laws, not one based on people getting benefits just because of who they know."[138]
January 19, 2021 John Harold Wall District of Minnesota June 4, 1992 60 months' imprisonment; four years' supervised release Possession of methamphetamine with intent to distribute Wall, age 63 at the time of the pardon, of Prior Lake, Minnesota, pleaded guilty to a methamphetamine offense in 1992; as part of a plea agreement, a count of using a firearm during a drug-trafficking offense was dismissed. Wall completed his prison sentence in 1996. The White House press release announcing the pardon said that it was supported by former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein; Andrew M. Luger, the former U.S. Attorney for Minnesota; and the Office of the Pardon Attorney.[139]
January 19, 2021 Robert Zangrillo District of Massachusetts N/A N/A Conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and honest services mail and wire fraud; conspiracy to commit federal programs bribery; money laundering conspiracy; wire fraud and honest services wire fraud (six counts); federal programs bribery (two counts); filing a false tax return Zangrillo is a prominent Miami businessman and the founder of the private investment firm Dragon Global. He was arrested in March 2019 and charged with taking part in the Varsity Blues college admissions bribery scheme by paying $250,000 to get his daughter accepted as a transfer student to the University of Southern California (USC). Zangrillo pleaded not guilty, and prior to the pardon, he was set to stand trial in September 2021. The White House said that the pardon was supported by USC alumnus and university trustee Thomas J. Barrack Jr., a longtime Trump friend who chaired his inauguration committee. However, Barrack denied involvement in the pardon.[140]
January 20, 2021 Albert J. (Al) Pirro, Jr. Southern District of New York November 1, 2000 29 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $62,446 restitution Conspiracy to defraud the United States; tax evasion (four counts); fraud (29 counts) Pirro, a former power broker in New York Republican politics, is the former husband of Jeanine Pirro, the Fox News host and consistent Trump ally.[115]

CommutationsEdit

Trump issued 94 commutations: one in 2017, four in 2018, two in 2019, five in 2020, and 83 in January 2021.[30]

Date of commutation[141] Name[141] Court[141] Sentencing date[141] Sentence[141] Offense[141] Notes
December 20, 2017 Sholom Rubashkin Northern District of Iowa June 22, 2010 324 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $26,852,152.51 restitution Bank fraud (14 counts); false statements and reports to a bank (24 counts); wire fraud (14 counts); mail fraud (nine counts); money laundering and aiding and abetting (10 counts); willful violation of order of Secretary of Agriculture and aiding and abetting (15 counts) Rubashkin was the chief executive of Agriprocessors, a large meatpacking corporation. The company's plant in Postville, Iowa, once the U.S.'s largest kosher meatpacking operation, was the raided by immigration agents in 2008, and almost 400 undocumented workers, including several children, were detained. Rubashkin was convicted of bank fraud and related offenses for fabricating collateral for loans; prosecutors said that as a result of Rubashkin's conduct, banks lost more than $26 million. After his fraud conviction, the immigration-related charges against Rubashkin were dropped; some of the plant's managers and supervisors were convicted of harboring illegal immigrants (a felony) and approximately 300 employees at the plant (mostly Guatemalans) were convicted of identity theft.[142] The commutation released Rubashkin from prison 19 years earlier than planned, bit left in place a term of supervised release and a substantial restitution obligation.[143]
June 6, 2018 Alice Marie Johnson Western District of Tennessee March 21, 1997 Life imprisonment; five years' supervised release (March 21, 1997) Conspiracy to possess cocaine, attempted possession of cocaine, money laundering Johnson was convicted in 1996 for her involvement in a Memphis cocaine trafficking organization and sentenced to life imprisonment.[144][145] Trump commuted Johnson's sentence following a meeting with Kim Kardashian; the commutation of the sentence caused Johnson's release from prison after more than 21 years.[146][147][148][149][150][151]
July 10, 2018
  • Dwight Lincoln Hammond Jr.
  • Steven Dwight Hammond
District of Oregon October 30, 2012 12 months and one day's imprisonment; 3 years' supervised release; amended to 60 months' imprisonment on October 7, 2015 (Steven); 3 months' imprisonment; 3 years' supervised release; amended to 60 months' imprisonment on October 7, 2015 (Dwight) Use of fire to damage and destroy property of the United States (one count for Dwight, two counts for Steven) In addition to the full pardon on the same day, Trump commuted the Hammonds' arson prison sentences to time served,[152] and ordered their immediate release.[153]
July 29, 2019 Ronen Nahmani Southern District of Florida October 9, 2015 240 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute controlled substances and controlled substance analogues Nahmani, an Israel-born Florida resident, was convicted in 2015 of conspiracy to distribute synthetic drugs acquired from China, and was sentenced to 20 years' imprisonment.[154][155] Hakeem Jeffries, Mark Meadows, and Alan Dershowitz supported Nahmani's clemency request.[155] In commuting Nahmani, the Trump White House cited his lack of a previous criminal history, his five young children, and the terminal illness of his wife.[155][54][156]
July 29, 2019 Theodore E. (Ted) Suhl Eastern District of Arkansas October 27, 2016 84 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $200,000 fine Aiding and abetting honest services wire fraud (two counts); aiding and abetting bribery concerning programs receiving federal funds; aiding and abetting Travel Act Suhl formerly operated faith-based behavioral healthcare treatment centers for juveniles in Arkansas, including a residential center called Lord's Ranch (later renamed Trinity Behavioral Health) and several outpatient centers.[157] He was convicted in 2016 on four counts of bribery[54] in connection with a scheme from 2007 to 2011 to increase Medicaid payments to his company through payments made a state Arkansas Department of Human Services official (an ex-state legislator) via an intermediary.[157] Both the official and the intermediary were also prosecuted and sentenced to federal prison.[157] In a statement, the White House said that Trump's decision to commute the sentence was influenced by support from former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee and former U.S. attorney Bud Cummins.[157][54]
February 18, 2020 Rod Blagojevich Northern District of Illinois December 7, 2011 Fourteen years in prison; two years' supervised release; $20,000 fine wire fraud (10 counts); conspiracy/attempted extortion (four counts); corrupt solicitation of funds; conspiracy to corruptly solicit funds (two counts); making false statements Blagojevich, a Democrat, was a former governor of Illinois and a contestant on Trump's reality TV show, The Celebrity Apprentice.[59] Convicted of attempting to sell the Senate seat vacated by Barack Obama, plus extortion by withholding state funds being directed towards a children's hospital and a race track.[158] The Illinois House impeached him for abuse of power and corruption. In two separate and unanimous votes of the Illinois Senate, he was removed from office and prohibited from ever holding public office in the state of Illinois again.[159] See also: Rod Blagojevich corruption charges.[59]
February 18, 2020 Judith Negron Southern District of Florida December 8, 2011 35 years' imprisonment (as amended); three years' supervised release; and $87,533,863.46 restitution Conspiracy to commit health care fraud; health care fraud (two counts); conspiracy to defraud the United States and to receive and pay health care kickbacks; conspiracy to commit money laundering; money laundering (16 counts); structuring to avoid reporting requirements (three counts) Negron, of Hialeah, Florida, age 49 at the time of the commutation, was convicted for her role in a major Medicare fraud scheme. The commutation released her from prison after serving eight years of her 35-year sentence and relieved her from her obligation to pay the remainder of $87 million in restitution.[17]
February 18, 2020 Crystal Munoz Western District of Texas January 24, 2008 15 years, 8 months' imprisonment; 5 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 1,000 or more kilograms of marijuana
February 18, 2020 Tynice Nichole Hall Northern District of Texas July 28, 2006 20 years, 8 months' imprisonment; 5 years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute, possess with intent to distribute, and manufacture more than 50 grams of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine base (crack cocaine) and aiding and abetting; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base and aiding and abetting; possession of cocaine with intent to manufacture cocaine base and aiding and abetting; receipt of firearms by a person under felony indictment and aiding and abetting; possession of firearms in furtherance of drug trafficking crimes and aiding and abetting Hall, of Lubbock, Texas, was convicted on various drug charges and served almost 14 years before being granted clemency. The commutation of Hall's sentence was urged by Alice Marie Johnson.[160]
July 10, 2020 Roger Stone District of Columbia February 20, 2020 40 months' imprisonment; 24 months' supervised release conditioned upon performance of 250 hours' community service; $20,000 fine Making false statements to Congress (five counts)
Witness tampering
Obstructing an official proceeding
Stone is a friend and adviser of Trump, who was a member of Trump's 2016 presidential campaign. In November 2019, Stone was convicted by a jury on all seven charges that he faced, in relation to his actions during the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections. The sentencing judge stated that Stone had been "prosecuted for covering up for the president"—Trump himself. In June 2020, around a month before the commutation, Trump had declared that Stone "can sleep well at night!" At the time of the commutation, Stone had been scheduled to report to federal prison around a week later.[161][162][163]
October 21, 2020 Lenora Logan Southern District of Iowa December 30, 1999 324 months' imprisonment (amended); 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine base ("crack") Commutation urged by Alice Marie Johnson.[164]
October 21, 2020 Rashella Reed Southern District of Georgia November 6, 2013 14 years' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $8 million restitution Wire fraud and money laundering Commutation urged by Alice Marie Johnson.[164]
October 21, 2020 Charles Tanner Northern District of Indiana May 26, 2009 30 years' imprisonment; ten years' supervised release; $1,000 fine Conspiracy to possess cocaine, attempted possession of cocaine Commutation urged by Alice Marie Johnson.[164]
October 21, 2020 John Bolen Southern District of Florida March 5, 2007 Life imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to import, attempted importation of, and possession of cocaine Commutation urged by Alice Marie Johnson.[164]
October 21, 2020 Curtis McDonald Western District of Tennessee February 28, 1997 Life imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess cocaine, attempted possession of cocaine, money laundering Commutation urged by Alice Marie Johnson: McDonald was a co-conspirator of Johnson's.[164]
December 22, 2020 Steve Stockman Southern District of Texas November 7, 2018 10 years' imprisonment; $1,014,718.51 in restitution; three years of supervised release Mail fraud, money laundering, violations of federal election law Stockman, a former Republican congressman from Texas, had been convicted and sentenced to ten years in prison for misusing $1.25 million in donations from political donors by spending the money on personal expenses rather than charity, as he had pledged. The commutation released Stockman from prison after two years.[165]
December 22, 2020 Crystal Munoz Western District of Texas January 24, 2008 15 years, 8 months' imprisonment; 5 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 1,000 or more kilograms of marijuana Commutation of supervised release, after earlier commutation of prison sentence in February 2020.
December 22, 2020 Judith Negron Southern District of Florida December 8, 2011 35 years' imprisonment (as amended); three years' supervised release; and $87,533,863.46 restitution Conspiracy to commit health care fraud; health care fraud (two counts); conspiracy to defraud the United States and to receive and pay health care kickbacks; conspiracy to commit money laundering; money laundering (16 counts); structuring to avoid reporting requirements (three counts) Commutation of supervised release, after earlier commutation of prison sentence in February 2020.
December 22, 2020 Tynice Nichole Hall Northern District of Texas July 28, 2006 20 years, 8 months' imprisonment; 5 years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute, possess with intent to distribute, and manufacture more than 50 grams of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine base (crack cocaine) and aiding and abetting; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base and aiding and abetting; possession of cocaine with intent to manufacture cocaine base and aiding and abetting; receipt of firearms by a person under felony indictment and aiding and abetting; possession of firearms in furtherance of drug trafficking crimes and aiding and abetting Commutation of supervised release, after earlier commutation of prison sentence in February 2020.
December 22, 2020 Philip Esformes Southern District of Florida September 12, 2019 240 months' imprisonment; three years supervised release; $5,530,207 restitution Conspiracy to defraud the United States and pay and receive health care kickbacks; receipt of kickbacks in connection with a federal health care program (two counts); payment of kickbacks in connection with a federal health care program (four counts); conspiracy to commit money laundering; money laundering (six counts); conspiracy to commit federal program bribery; conspiracy to commit federal program bribery and honest services wire fraud; obstruction of justice Esformes ran a network of nursing homes in Chicago that he used to perpetrate a massive Medicaid fraud scheme involving about $1.3 billion in fraudulent claims. Esformes used the proceeds of the scheme for luxury goods and private jet travel. The Aleph Institute, a group that was influential in Trump's clemencymaking, lobbied for his commutation; the organization received $65,000 from Esformes's family from 2016 to 2019, during Esformes' prosecution and imprisonment.[87][166]
December 23, 2020 Daniela Gozes-Wagner Southern District of Texas March 6, 2019 240 months' imprisonment; three years supervised release; $15,283,985 restitution Conspiracy to commit health care fraud; conspiracy to commit money laundering[83] Gozes-Wagner took part in a health care fraud scheme. Her codefendants, who led the scheme, accepted a plea deal and were sentenced to between five and ten years in prison; Gozes-Wagner rejected a four-year plea offer and chose to go to trial. She was convicted and sentenced to 20 years. Gozes-Wagner's clemency request was supported by a group of former judges, federal prosecutors, law professors, and attorneys.[167]
December 23, 2020 Mark Shapiro Southern District of New York October 25, 2010 85 years imprisonment Substantive and conspiratorial counts of securities fraud, mail fraud and wire fraud Shapiro and Stitsky defrauded $23 million from 250 investors.[83]
Irving Stitsky
January 13, 2021 Fred Davis Clark Jr. Southern District of Florida February 22, 2016 480 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $179,076,941.89 restitution Bank fraud (three counts); false statement in connection with federally insured loan (three counts); obstruction of official proceeding Clark, of Orlando, Florida, masterminded a $300 million Ponzi scheme targeting residents of Clearwater and other Florida cities as part of a vacation rental scam. He was sentenced to 40 years in prison in 2016.[168] Trump's commutation immediately released Clark from prison, but left intact his five years of supervised released and obligation to pay $179 million in restitution.[168] The Tampa Bay Times editorial board criticized Trump's commutation of Clark's sentence, describing it as an "outrageous injustice reeks of favoritism and privilege and confirms how easily a president can abuse clemency power."[169]
January 13, 2021 Jon Michael Harder District of Oregon November 17, 2015 180 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release (as amended by order of December 2, 2015) Mail fraud; engaging in monetary transactions in property derived from specified unlawful activity Harder, the founder and CEO of Sunwest Management (once the U.S. third-largest assisted living chain, operating more than 300 homes at its peak), was convicted of defrauding investors and money laundering after the company collapsed. He was sentenced to 12 years; Trump commuted the prison term.[170]
January 13, 2021 Chris Young Middle District of Tennessee September 12, 2014 168 months' imprisonment (as amended); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine and 280 grams or more of crack cocaine; attempted possession of a detectable amount of cocaine with intent to distribute within 1,000 feet of a school; felon in possession of a firearm; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime Young, of Clarksville, Tennessee, was initially sentenced to life imprisonment under a federal three-strikes law, for a third drug-related conviction (his prior two convictions were when he was 18 and 19 years old). After sentencing judge Kevin H. Sharp retired from the bench, he advocated for clemency for Young.[171]
January 13, 2021 William "Billy" T. Walters Southern District of New York July 27, 2017 60 months' imprisonment; one year of supervised release; $10,000,000 fine; $8,890,969.33 restitution Conspiracy to commit securities fraud; conspiracy to commit wire fraud; securities fraud (four counts); wire fraud (four counts) Walters, a weather sports gambler, was sentenced to five years in prison for his participation in an insider trading scheme.[107]
January 13, 2021 Adrianne Davis Miller Southern District of Alabama April 23, 2015 180 months' imprisonment; 5 years' imprisonment (as amended September 2019) Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine; possession of a list I chemical with knowledge and reasonable cause to believe it would be used to manufacture a controlled substance
January 13, 2021 Kwame M. Kilpatrick Eastern District of Michigan October 10, 2013 336 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $4,799,826.61 restitution Racketeering conspiracy; interference with commerce by extortion (five counts); bribery concerning programs receiving federal funds; mail fraud (10 counts); wire fraud (two counts); subscribing false tax return (six counts) Kilpatrick, a Democrat who was mayor of Detroit until his resignation from 2002 until his resignation in 2008, was tried and convicted on 24 corruption counts for using his office to enrich himself and associates, and was sentenced to 28 years. Kilpatrick denied responsibility, but all his appeals were rejected. Trump's commutation reduced his sentence to time served, releasing him from prison immediately (20 years early) rather than in 2037. Along with the sentence given to Jimmy Dimora, Kilpatrick's sentence was a record length for a public corruption scandal. U.S. Attorney Matthew J. Schneider strongly criticized Trump's grant of a commutation to Kilpatrick, calling him a "disgraced ... notorious and unrepentant criminal" who "earned every day he served in federal prison for the horrible crimes he committed against the people of Detroit." The current mayor of Detroit, Mike Duggan, supported Kilpatrick's commutation, calling him "a person of great talent who still has much to contribute." Governor Gretchen Whitmer said Kilpatrick's crimes were "reprehensible" but that his sentence was harsh. The commutation left intact Kilpatrick's obligation to pay $195,000 owed to the IRS and $1.5 million in restitution to the City of Detroit. Prior to receiving clemency, Kilpatrick had praised Trump, writing letters saying that his tenure had been an "unprecedented success."[172] Kilpatrick's bid for clemency was supported by a number of Trump allies, including Diamond and Silk and Peter Karmanos Jr.[115]
January 19, 2021 Michael H. Ashley Eastern District of New York July 18, 2019 36 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $49,307,759.84 restitution Bank fraud Ashley was chief business strategist at Melville, New York-based Lend America, a large mortgage lender that imploded in 2009, resulting in $49 million in federally guaranteed loans (backed by Ginnie Mae) from being unfunded. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Dorothy Eisenberg wrote in 2013 that Ashley "diverted over $50 million" of money from Lend America's parent company's "for his own benefit, and/or for the benefit of his affiliated entities or relatives"; Ashley pleaded guilty to bank fraud in 2011 and was sentenced in 2019. Trump's commutation eliminated Ashley's prison term (which he had been ordered to serve starting in March 2021). However, the commutation left intact the court's order to serve five years of supervised release, pay $49 million in restitution, and forfeit $800,000.[173]
January 19, 2021 David Morris Barren Eastern District of Maryland August 11, 2010 360 months' imprisonment (as amended by executive clemency on January 19, 2017); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute over five kilograms of cocaine; conspiracy to structure financial transactions; concealment money laundering (31 counts); structuring (two counts); money laundering-avoid reporting requirements (six counts); money laundering over $10,000 (eight counts); promotion money laundering (two counts)
January 19, 2021 Kristina Kay Bohnenkamp Eastern District of Northern District of Iowa January 5, 2011 262 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of March 24, 2015); 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of actual methamphetamine after having been convicted of a felony drug offense
January 19, 2021 Jonathan Braun Eastern District of New York May 28, 2019 10 years' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $100,000 fine Conspiracy to import marijuana into the United States; money laundering Braun, of Staten Island, served one year of a 10-year sentence for running a large-scale drug trafficking organization. Court records indicated that Braun had a history of violence and threats. After being indicted in 2009, he pleaded guilty, but while on bail awaiting sentencing, led to Canada and then to Israel, where court records indicated he continued to lead the drug ring. Braun was arrested after he returned to the United States, but was not sentenced until 2019 and was ordered to prison until January 2020. The commutation of his sentence was granted by Trump outside the usual DOJ process. Braun continues to face a state criminal investigation and possible civil liability from a Federal Trade Commission and New York State Attorney General suit arising from an entirely separate matter: Braun's alleged involvement in a predatory loan operation that targeted and threatened small-business owners.[174]
January 19, 2021 Ann Marie Butler District of South Carolina July 22, 2010 360 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of 5 kilograms or more of cocaine, 50 grams or more of cocaine base, and a quantity of 3,4- methylenedioxymethamphetamine
January 19, 2021 Matthew Antione Canady Southern District of Iowa April 10, 2009 262 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of December 22, 2014); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute at least 50 grams of cocaine base
January 19, 2021 Craig Cesal District of Northern District of Georgia September 26, 2003 360 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of August 22, 2016) Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute marijuana
January 19, 2021 Jeff Cheney Northern District of Iowa February 21, 2008 216 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to manufacture and distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine mixture following a felony drug conviction
January 19, 2021 Mario Claiborne Northern District of Illinois May 23, 1994 Life imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine; engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise; use of the telephone to facilitate felony drug distribution (six counts); possession with intent to distribute cocaine (six counts); distribution of cocaine (four counts); conducting financial transactions with money from drug transactions (two counts)
January 19, 2021 Corvain T. Cooper Western District of North Carolina July 28, 2014 Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute marijuana; conspiracy to commit money laundering; structuring currency transactions and aiding and abetting the same Cooper, of Los Angeles, age 41 at the time of the commutation, was sentenced to life for conspiracy to distribute marijuana under a three-strikes law.[175]
January 19, 2021 April D. Coots Western District of Missouri August 11, 2009 240 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to manufacture and distribute methamphetamine
January 19, 2021 James Brian Cruz Western District of Texas June 26, 2001 480 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $25,000 fine Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute more than 500 grams of methamphetamine
January 19, 2021 Marquis Dargon Middle District of Florida May 8, 2008 210 months' imprisonment; eight years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and to distribute five hundred 500 grams or more of cocaine
January 19, 2021 Jaime A. Davidson Northern District of New York July 1, 1993 Life imprisonment plus five years' imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute cocaine; distribute cocaine (four counts); murder of DEA agent; murder of DEA agent in furtherance of drug conspiracy; use of firearm during drug trafficking crime Davidson was a drug kingpin who was sentenced to life for ordering a robbery in 1990 that led to the murder of Wallie Howard, a Syracuse, New York police officer working as an undercover investigator. The commutation released Davison, age 52 at the time of the commutation, from prison after serving 29 years of a life sentence. Davidson never accepted responsibility for the crime and maintained for years that he was wrongfully convicted. Trump's commutation of Davidson's sentence was criticized by the region's congressman John Katko, Syracuse Police Chief Kenton Buckner, Onondaga County District Attorney William Fitzpatrick, and the federal prosecutor who handled the trial.[176]
January 19, 2021 John Estin Davis Middle District of Tennessee July 9, 2020 42 months' imprisonment; one year's supervised release; $20,000 fine (as amended) Conspiracy to violate the anti-kickback statute and conspiracy to defraud the United States; receipt of kickbacks in connection with a federal healthcare program
January 19, 2021 Anthony M. DeJohn Northern District of New York July 26, 2010 Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of marijuana; possession of firearms by a convicted felon
January 19, 2021 Kenneth Charles Fragoso Southern District of Texas June 6, 1991 Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute in excess of five kilograms of cocaine Fragoso, age 66 at the time of the commitation, sold 10 kilograms (22 lb) of cocaine in 1990 to a DEA informant; he was sentenced to life imprisonment because it was his third offense.[137]
January 19, 2021 Robert Francis Eastern District of Missouri October 3, 2002 Life imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute cocaine
January 19, 2021 Darrell Frazier (1) Eastern District of Tennessee; (2) Northern District of Georgia (1) January 22, 1990; (2) March 30, 2004 (1) Life imprisonment; (2) 18 months' imprisonment (consecutive); six years' supervised release (1) Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine hydrochloride; (2) Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute heroin
January 19, 2021 Rodney Nakia Gibson District of South Carolina July 28, 2009 211 months' imprisonment (as amended by orders of November 15, 2015 and January 9, 2017); five years' supervised release Money laundering; conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and to distribute 5 kilograms or more of cocaine and 50 grams or more of cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute 5 kilograms or more of cocaine; possession of a firearm during and in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime
January 19, 2021 Jennings Gilbert Eastern District of Kentucky September 12, 2006 240 months imprisonment; 10 years supervised release Conspiracy to manufacture over 1000 marijuana plants possession with intent to distribute marijuana
January 19, 2021 Javier Gonzales District of Montana December 19, 2005 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine and distribution of methamphetamine; possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine and distribution of methamphetamine (two counts); use of a communication facility to facilitate the distribution of methamphetamine
January 19, 2021 Luis Gonzalez Eastern District of Texas\ December 6, 1993 Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Possession with intent to distribute cocaine
January 19, 2021 Michael Harris (Harry O) Central District of California November 26, 1990 235 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release Possession with intent to distribute less than 500 grams of cocaine hydrochloride; using/carrying a firearm during or in relation to a drug trafficking crime Harris was a co-founder of the Death Row Records record label. Snoop Dogg had been one of the advocates of clemency for Harris.[177]
January 19, 2021 Dwayne L. Harrison Southern District of Mississippi September 11, 2006 262 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release Possession with intent to distribute less than 500 grams of cocaine hydrochloride; using/carrying a firearm during or in relation to a drug trafficking crime
January 19, 2021 Raymond Hersman Southern District of West Virginia December 31, 2013 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine
January 19, 2021 Lou Hobbs District of Columbia August 4, 1997 Life imprisonment, five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 5 kilograms or more of cocaine and 50 grams or more of cocaine base; Unlawful possession with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine, attempted unlawful possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base
January 19, 2021 Reginald Dinez Johnson Eastern District of Missouri March 3, 2005 262 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of April 22, 2015); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine and PCP
January 19, 2021 Bill K. Kapri (Kodak Black) Southern District of Florida November 13, 2019 46 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release Making a false statement in connection with the acquisition or attempted acquisition of a firearm (two counts)
January 19, 2021 Cassandra Anne Kasowski Southern District of North Dakota March 20, 2014 186 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of September 19, 2018); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance (methamphetamine)
January 19, 2021 Traie Tavares Kelly Southern District of South Carolina January 7, 2009 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base and 5 kilograms or more of cocaine
January 19, 2021 Kyle Kimoto Southern District of Illinois September 5, 2008 350 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $34,915,321.30 restitution Conspiracy; mail fraud in connection with telemarketing; wire fraud in connection with telemarketing (12 counts)
January 19, 2021 Sharon King Southern District of New York December 9, 2008 180 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of October 24, 2012); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine and a quantity of marijuana; distribution and possession with intent to distribute more than 500 grams of cocaine; distribution and possession with intent to distribute a quantity of marijuana; using and carrying a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime
January 19, 2021 Noah Kleinman Central District of California December 8, 2014 211 months' imprisonment, five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute marijuana (two counts); distribution of marijuana (two counts); maintaining a drug-involved premises; conspiracy to launder money
January 19, 2021 John Richard Knock Northern District of Florida January 30, 2001 Life imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $1,411,476,800 fine Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute marijuana; conspiracy to import marijuana; conspiracy to launder monetary instruments
January 19, 2021 Mary Anne Locke Northern District of Iowa June 30, 2009 234 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine (mixture) within 1,000 feet of a protected location; conspiracy to commit money laundering
January 19, 2021 Tena M. Logan Central District of Illinois June 28, 2013 168 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of August 3, 2015); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to manufacture, distribute, and possess with the intent to distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine; possession of 500 grams or more of methamphetamine with intent to distribute
January 19, 2021 Way Quoe Long Eastern District of California March 16, 1998 600 months' imprisonment; 60 months' imprisonment Continuing criminal enterprise; conspiracy to manufacture, distribute and to possess with intent to distribute marijuana; manufacturing of marijuana and aiding and abetting (two counts); using and carrying a firearm during a drug trafficking offense; possession of a firearm silencer without a serial number; possession of a machine gun (two counts)
January 19, 2021 Hector Madrigal, Sr. Southern District of Texas July 20, 2007 20 years' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute a quantity in excess of 1,000 kilograms of marijuana
January 19, 2021 Chalana C. McFarland Northern District of Georgia August 24, 2005 360 months' imprisonment; 5 years' supervised release; $11,417,352.44 restitution Conspiracy to commit bank fraud, mail fraud, wire fraud, fraudulent use of Social Security numbers, fraudulent transfer of identification, fraud against the Department of Housing and Urban Development, money laundering, engagement in monetary transactions in property derived from specified unlawful activity, and obstruction of justice; bank fraud (30 counts); wire fraud (60 counts); money laundering (73 counts); obstruction of justice; perjury (4 counts) McFarland, an Atlanta real estate closing attorney who was the ringleader of a mortgage fraud scheme that lasted from the late 1990s to early 2000s. The loans obtained by fraud totaled almost $20 million. She had been convicted of 169 counts in 2005. The commutation released her from prison after serving 15 years of a 30-year sentence; her request for clemency was supported by the CAN-DO Foundation.[178]
January 19, 2021 Salomon E. Melgen Southern District of Florida February 22, 2018 204 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $52,997,442 restitution (as amended April 5, 2018) Health care fraud (36 counts); false, fictitious and fraudulent claims (19 counts); false statements relating to health care (11 counts) Trump commuted the remainder of the prison sentence of Melgen, a prominent South Florida ophthalmologist who had been sentenced to 17 years for a $73 million scheme to defraud the government of Medicare payments from 2008 and 2013; Melgen's practice grew "by giving elderly patients unnecessary eye injections and laser blasts on their retinas that some compared to torture."[179] Melgen's case was high-profile in part because of his association with Senator Bob Menendez (D-NJ); Menendez was tried (but not convicted) on charges of accepting gifts from Melgen.[179][17]
January 19, 2021 Jawad Amir Musa Southern District of New York April 23, 1993 Life imprisonment, five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute one kilogram or more of heroin Musa was arrested in a 1990 DEA "reverse sting" operation in which Musa offered $20,000 for a heroin transaction. He received a mandatory life sentence in 1991; because Musa had two relevant prior convictions, the sentencing court had no discretion. Musa's clemency petition was supported by Kenneth Wainstein, who prosecuted the case, and John Gleeson, a retired federal judge who represented Musa. Current prosecutors assigned to the matter opposed Musa's request for executive clemency. Trump's commutation released Musa after 30 years in federal prison.[180]
January 19, 2021 Sydney Melissa Navarro Northern District of Texas December 23, 2013 275 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of May 10, 2016); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance
January 19, 2021 Issac Nelson Southern District of South Carolina June 10, 2010 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of five kilograms or more of cocaine and 50 grams or more of crack cocaine
January 19, 2021 Lerna Lea Paulson District of North Dakota September 4, 2014 204 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribute a controlled substance
January 19, 2021 Michael Pelletier Northern District of Maine January 22, 2008 Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $83,847.55 restitution Conspiracy to import marijuana; conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute marijuana; money laundering (four counts); conspiracy to engage in money laundering; conspiracy to engage in money laundering structuring; social security fraud (two counts); conspiracy to engage in social security fraud Pelletier of Saint David, Maine, age 64 at the time of the commutation, ran an cross-border marijuana smuggling operation in Maine from 2003 to 2006. He was granted clemency that released him from prison after serving 13 years of a life sentence, and had previously petitioned for compassionate release. Pelletier has been paralyzed from the waist down after a farming accident at age 11, and uses a wheelchair. His petition for clemency was supported by the CAN-DO Foundation.[181]
January 19, 2021 Tara Michelle Perry Northern District of Texas February 18, 2014 195 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of July 5, 2016); four years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance
January 19, 2021 Dwayne Phelps Southern District of Indiana November 5, 2009 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine (mixture); possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine (mixture)
January 19, 2021 Jodi Lynn Richter District of North Dakota February 7, 2011 179 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of February 29, 2016); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribute a controlled substance
January 19, 2021 Lavonne Arlene Roach District of South Dakota March 2, 1998 30 years' imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to distribute controlled substance
January 19, 2021 Mary Marcella Roberts District of North Dakota September 6, 2011 228 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribute a controlled substance
January 19, 2021 James R. Romans Eastern District of Texas February 22, 2013 360 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of July 24, 2017); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute marijuana
January 19, 2021 Ferrell Damon Scott Southern District of Texas April 2, 2009 Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $10,000 fine Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute in excess of 1,000 kilograms of marijuana; possession with intent to distribute in excess of 100 kilograms of marijuana (three counts)
January 19, 2021 Adriana Shayota Northern District of California June 20, 2017 26 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $144,868 fine Conspiracy to traffic in counterfeit goods; conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement and conspiracy to introduce misbranded food into interstate commerce
January 19, 2021 Luis Fernando Sicard Southern District of Florida September 29, 2000 353 months' imprisonment (as amended by order of December 10, 2015); five years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine; possession of a firearm during and in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime
January 19, 2021 Brian Wayne Simmons District of Oregon May 28, 2013 180 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to manufacture, distribute, and/or possess with intent to distribute 100 or more marijuana plants and/or 100 or more kilograms of marijuana; manufacture, distribute, and/or possess with intent to distribute 100 or more marijuana plants and/or 100 or more kilograms of marijuana (two counts)
January 19, 2021 Derrick Bruce Smith Western District of Missouri August 23, 2002 340 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release Distribution of cocaine resulting in death; possession with intent to distribute cocaine
January 19, 2021 Monstsho Eugene Vernon District of South Carolina July 23, 2001 482 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $10,930 restitution Attempted armed bank robbery; armed bank robbery (six counts); use and carry of a firearm in relation to a crime of violence (two counts) Vernon was granted clemency after serving 19 years of a 40-year prison sentence for a string of bank robberies in Greenville County, South Carolina, in 2001.[182]
January 19, 2021 Blanca Maribel Virgen Northern District of Texas August 14, 2009 360 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $50,000 fine Conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; maintaining drug-involved premises
January 19, 2021 Jerry Donnell Walden Southern District of New York November 16, 1998 480 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiracy to violate federal narcotics laws
January 19, 2021 Eliyahu (Eli) Weinstein District of New Jersey (1) February 25, 2014; (2) December 15, 2014 (1) 264 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $215,350,459 restitution; $215,350,459 forfeiture; (2) 135 months' imprisonment (all but 24 months concurrent); three years' supervised release; $6,176,750 restitution; $6,176,150 forfeiture (1) Conspiracy to commit wire fraud; monetary transactions from specified lawful activity; (2) Conspiracy to commit wire fraud; committing wire fraud while on pretrial release; transacting in criminal proceeds Weinstein, age 45 at the time of the commutation, was a con man and former used car salesman from Lakewood, New Jersey, pleaded guilty to running a $200 million Ponzi scheme involving phony real estate investments and—while awaiting trial on those charges—running a $6.7 million scam claiming special access to the Facebook, Inc. initial public offering. Sentenced to 24 years in prison, he was represented in his request for clemency by Alan Dershowitz, who was also Trump's personal lawyer. New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal, who as an Assistant U.S. Attorney prosecuted Weinstein, called Trump's grant of clemency "one huckster commuting the sentence of another."[183] Weinstein hired Nick Muzin, a lobbyist and former aide to Republican Senators Ted Cruz and Tim Scott, to lobby Trump's chief of staff Mark Meadows for clemency.[4]
January 19, 2021 Sholam Weiss Middle District of Florida February 15, 2000 835 years' imprisonment (as amended by order of July 16, 2009); three years' supervised release; $123,399,910 fine; $125,016,656 restitution; and a January 9, 2009 order of $57,213,591.46 forfeiture (as amended on June 7, 2011 and May 5, 2012) Racketeering; racketeering conspiracy (27 counts); interstate transportation of stolen property (23 counts); money laundering (29 counts); false statements (two counts) Weiss, a former New York businessman, orchestrated a series of financial frauds that led to the collapse of the National Heritage Life Insurance Company. While out on bail, Weiss fled the country and became a fugitive for more than a year in Austria. He was sentenced to 835 years in 2000. Weiss's nephew advocated for his commutation, and Weiss hired lobbyist Brett Tolman to persuade Trump to grant it. Prominent backers of Weiss's clemency bid included Edwin Meese, Seth Waxman, and Alan Dershowitz.[184]
January 19, 2021 Tom Leroy Whitehurst Eastern District of Missouri October 10, 1996 Life imprisonment; five years' supervised release Conspiring to manufacture in excess of 100 grams of methamphetamine; use of fire and explosive materials to destroy property used in interstate commerce and in activity affecting interstate commerce; destruction of property to prevent seizure; felon in possession of firearms (two counts); possession of ephedrine with intent to manufacture methamphetamine
January 19, 2021 Caroline Yeats Northern District of Texas March 3, 2014 240 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance

MiscellaneousEdit

In 2019, former Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher was demoted following a July 2, 2019 court martial based on accusations that he had committed a war crime. Trump later reversed his demotion.

ResponsesEdit

 
Trump in the Oval Office with commutation recipients

In October 2019, New York enacted the TRUST Act, which was signed into law by Andrew Cuomo. Among other things, the act closed a double jeopardy provision of state law to allow state prosecutors to pursue charges for violations of New York law against individuals pardoned by the president for a violation of federal law. The New York legislation was aimed at Trump's use of the pardon power.[185] New York state attorney general Letitia James, proposed the law after multiple former Trump associates were investigated in New York state. James' office has been investigating the finances of Trump and the Trump Organization.[185] Upon passage of the law, James said that "We have a responsibility to ensure that individuals who commit crimes under New York state law are held accountable for those crimes. This critical new law closes a gaping loophole that could have allowed any president to abuse the presidential pardon power by unfairly granting a pardon to a family member or close associate and possibly allow that individual to evade justice altogether."[185]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

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