Open main menu

List of modern conflicts in North Africa

  Northern Africa (UN subregion)
  geographic, including above

Note:

  • "Modern" is defined as post-WWI period, from 1918 until today.
  • "North Africa" has a definition approximately that of the Arab term `Maghreb`.
  • "Conflict" is defined as a separate 100+ casualty incident.
  • In all cases conflicts are listed by total deaths, including subconflicts (specified below).


List of conflictsEdit

Date Conflict Location Casualties
1919 Egyptian Revolution of 1919   Egypt 800[1]-3,000[2]
1920–1926 Rif War[3]   Republic of the Rif 40,000–46,400
1939–1945 Mediterranean, Middle East and African theatres of World War II [a][verification needed]   Algeria,   Egypt,   Libya,   Morocco,   Tunisia 1,000,000
1945 1945 Tripoli pogrom British Tripolitania 140
1946 Egyptian Student Riots [4][verification needed][5]   Egypt 100–300
1952 Egyptian Revolution of 1952    Egypt 1,000
1952–1954 Tunisian War of Independence [6]   Tunisia 2,500
1955–1972 First Sudanese Civil War   Sudan 500,000
1954–1962 Algerian War of Independence [7]   Algeria 179,000–300,000
1957–1958 Ifni War   Morocco,   Spanish West Africa 8,400
1961 Bizerte crisis   Tunisia 654
1961–1964 First Tuareg rebellion   Mali   Niger
1963–1964 Sand War   Morocco,   Algeria 339
1965–1979 Civil war in Chad   Chad 500+
1970– Western Sahara conflict[b]   Mauritania,   Morocco,   Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic 14,000–21,000
1977 Libyan–Egyptian War [8]   Egypt,   Libya 500
1978–1987 Chadian–Libyan conflict   Libya,   Chad 8,500
1979–1982 Civil conflict in Chad [9][10]   Chad
1982–2002 Chadian Civil War[citation needed]   Chad 37,500
1983–2005 Second Sudanese Civil War [11][12]   Sudan 600,000–2,500,000
1983–1984 Tunisian bread riots [13]   Tunisia 150[14]
1986 Bombing of Libya (1986)   Libya 100
1986 1986 Egyptian Conscription Riot [15]   Egypt 107
1987 Executions by Abu Nidal's organization[16]   Libya 150–160
1990–1995 Tuareg Rebellion (1990–1995)[c]   Mali   Niger 650-1,500
1992–2000 Terrorism in Egypt [17][unreliable source?]   Egypt 1,300–2,000
1992–2002 Algerian Civil War[citation needed]   Algeria 100,000–200,000
2001–2002 Black Spring (Kabylie) [18]   Algeria 123
2002– Insurgency in the Maghreb   Morocco,   Algeria,   Mauritania,   Niger,   Mali 6000
2003– War in Darfur   Sudan 100,000–330,000
2005–2010 Civil war in Chad (2005–2010)   Chad   Sudan 1,140
2007–2009 Tuareg Rebellion (2007–2009)   Mali   Niger 350-1,330
2009– Sudanese nomadic conflicts   Sudan   South Sudan 3,000–3,500
2010–2011 Tunisian Revolution   Tunisia 338
2011– Sudan–SPLM-N conflict   Sudan 1,500
2011–2014 Egyptian Crisis   Egypt 4,686-4,687[d]
2011–present Libyan Crisis (2011–present)   Libya 40,000+[e]
2011–2013 Protests in Sudan (2011–13)   Sudan 200+
2012–present Northern Mali conflict   Mali 2000+

Casualties breakdownEdit

[a].^ North African Campaign (WWII) – combined figure ~430,000 killed:

Western Desert Campaign – 50,000 casualties.
Battle of Cape Bon – 900+ casualties.
Raid on Alexandria (1941) – 8 casualties.
Action off Cape Bougaroun – 27 killed.
Mers al-Kbir – 1,299 killed.
Operation Torch – 1,825 killed.
Tunisia campaign – ~376,000 killed.

[b].^ Polisario Front dispute for independence (combined casualty figure 14,020–14,038):

Western Sahara War – 7,000 Moroccan, Mauritianian and French soldiers killed; 4,000 Polisario killed; 3,000 civilians killed.
Independence Intifada (Western Sahara) – 1 killed.
Gdeim Izik protest camp – 18–36 killed.
2011 Sahrawi protests – 1 killed.

[c].^ Tuareg rebellion (1990–1995) combined casualties at least 650-1,500:

Tchin-Tabaradene massacre – 650-1,500 civilians killed.

[d].^ Egyptian Crisis combined casualty figure 4,686-4,687:

2011 Egyptian Revolution – 846 killed
Aftermath of the Egyptian Revolution – 300 killed
Timeline of the Egyptian Crisis under Mohamed Morsi 127-128 killed
Post-coup unrest in Egypt (2013–2014) 3143 killed
Insurgency in Egypt (2013–present) 570 killed

[e].^ Libyan Crisis combined casualty figure 40,000+:

2011 Libyan civil war – 25,000–30,000 killed
Post-civil war violence in Libya – Over 1000 killed
Libyan Civil War (2014–present) - thousands killed

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "800 NATIVES DEAD IN EGYPT'S RISING - 1,600 WOUNDED - Harmsworth Tells the Commons of Casualties in the Recent Outbreak. DEATH SENTENCES FOR 39 More Than 2,000 Imprisoned- British, Army Sustained Loss of 143. ALLENBY'S CONTROL FIRM Disorders Ended in April-Mahomed Said Pasha Co-operating as Premier. - Front Page - NYTimes.com". Select.nytimes.com. 10 June 2012. Retrieved 14 October 2013.
  2. ^ Scbulze, Reinbard (28 May 2002). A Modern History of the Islamic World – Reinhard Schulze – Google Books. ISBN 9781860648229. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  3. ^ Timeline for the Third Rif War (1920–25) Archived 20 December 2011 at the Wayback Machine Steven Thomas
  4. ^ "Egypt: Police Crack Down on Student Demonstration". Ikhwanweb. Retrieved 14 October 2013.
  5. ^ Ahmed Abdalla, The Student Movement and National Politics in Egypt 1923–1973. 2008: pp. 64–77 (1946: The Climax)
  6. ^ "French Tunisia (1881-1956)". University of Central Arkansas.
  7. ^ World Peace Foundation (August 2015). "Algeria: War of independence". Tufts University.
  8. ^ Pollack, Kenneth M. (21 January 2016). Arabs at War: Military Effectiveness, 1948–1991. Bison Books. p. 365. ISBN 978-0-8032-8783-9.
  9. ^ Sy, A. D. (June 1993). "Conflict and the women of Chad". Focus on Gender. 1 (2): 10–2. doi:10.1080/09682869308519962. PMID 12345211.
  10. ^ Sesay, Amadu. "The Limits of Peace-Keeping by a Regional Organization: The OAU Peace-Keeping Force in Chad". Centre for Digital Scholarship Journals.
  11. ^ "South Sudan profile - Timeline". BBC. August 2018.
  12. ^ World Peace Foundation (August 2015). "Sudan: 1985 – 2005". Tufts University.
  13. ^ WOODSON, WYATT (March 2018). "Tunisian (In)dependence and (Re)volution". anth461spring2018.web.unc.edu/.
  14. ^ Entelis 1997, p. 98.
  15. ^ Europa Publications Limited, The Middle East & North Africa, Volume 50: p.303
  16. ^ The New York Times. 1990. "Last October, the Fatah Revolutionary Council split after Abu Nidal's top aide, Atef Abu Baker, defected to P.L.O. headquarters in Tunis and set up his own faction, which he called the Fatah Revolutionary Council Emergency Leadership. Abu Baker said he had acted after Abu Nidal killed 150 of his men at his head office in the Libyan capital, Tripoli."[1]
  17. ^ "Armed Conflicts Report – Egypt". Ploughshares.ca. Retrieved 1 February 2011.
  18. ^ "Algeria : Unrest and Impasse in Kabylia : 10 June 2013" (PDF). Crisisgroup.org. Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 July 2013. Retrieved 14 October 2013.