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List of minor biblical figures, A–K

  (Redirected from List of minor biblical figures)

This list contains persons named in the Bible of minor notability, about whom either nothing or very little is known, aside from any family connections.

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AEdit

AbdeelEdit

Abdeel (Ab'dēel) (Hebrew עַבְדְּאֵל "servant of God"; akin to Arabic عبد الله Abdullah [1]) is mentioned in Jeremiah 36:26 as the father of Shelemiah, one of three men that were commanded by King Jehoiakim to seize the prophet Jeremiah and his secretary Baruch.[2] The Septuagint omits the phrase "and Shelemiah son of Abdeel", probably a scribal error due to homoioteleuton.[3]

AbdiEdit

The name Abdi (Hebrew עַבְדִּי) is probably an abbreviation of Obediah, meaning "servant of YHWH", according to the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia.[4] Easton's Bible Encyclopedia, on the other hand, holds that it means "my servant". The name "Abdi" appears three times in forms of the Bible that are in use among Jews, Protestants, and Roman Catholics. There is also one additional appearance in 1 Esdras, considered canonical in Eastern Orthodox Churches.

  1. 1 Chronicles 6:29.[5] "And on the left hand their brethren the sons of Merari: Ethan the son of Kishi, the son of Abdi, the son of Malluch."[6]
  2. 2 Chronicles 29:12. "Then the Levites arose, Mahath the son of Amasai, and Joel the son of Azariah, of the sons of the Kohathites; and of the sons of Merari, Kish the son of Abdi, and Azariah the son of Jehallelel; and of the Gershonites, Joah the son of Zimmah, and Eden the son of Joah."[6]
  3. Ezra 10:26. "And of the sons of Elam: Mattaniah, Zechariah, and Jehiel, and Abdi, and Jeremoth, and Elijah."[6]
  4. 1 Esdras 9:27, where the name appears in the Hellenized form Oabd[e]ios.[7] "Of the sons of Elam: Matthanias and Zacharias and Iezrielos and Obadios and Ieremoth and Elias."[8]

According to Cheyne and Black (1899), the two mentions in the Books of Chronicles are of a single individual, and the mentions in Ezra and 1 Esdras are of a second individual.[9]

AbdonEdit

Abdon (Hebrew עַבְדּוֹן from עָבַד "to serve") is the name of four biblical individuals. It is a diminutive form of the name Ebed.[10]

  1. An Abdon in the book of Judges: see the article Abdon (Judges).
  2. The first-born of Gibeon of the tribe of Benjamin, mentioned only in passing in genealogies (1 Chronicles 8:30, 9:36).
  3. Abdon the son of Micah. Josiah sent him, among others, to the prophetess Huldah, in order to discern the meaning of the recently rediscovered book of the law (2 Chronicles 34:20). He is referred to as Achbor in 2 Kings 22:12.
  4. Abdon son of Sashak. He is only mentioned as a name in a genealogy (1 Chronicles 8:23).[11]

In addition to its use as a personal name, the proper name "Abdon" is used for a Levitical city mentioned in Joshua 21:30 and 1 Chronicles 6:74 (6:59 in some versions).[12]

AbidaEdit

Abida or Abidah appears twice in the Bible,[13] as a son of Midian. Nothing further is said about him in the Bible.[14]

AbijahEdit

Abijah (Hebrew אֲבִיָּה "my father is YHWH") is the name of eight biblical individuals.

AbinadabEdit

Abinadab (Hebrew אֲבִינָדָב "my father apportions" or "the father [i.e. god of the clan] is munificent") [15] refers to four biblical characters. Where the Hebrew text reads Avinadav, Greek manuscripts of the Septuagint read Am(e)inadab or Abin.[15] but Brenton's translation of the Septuagint reads "Abinadab".

  1. A man of Kirjath-jearim, in whose house on a hill the ark of the covenant was deposited after having been brought back from the land of the Philistines.[16] "It is most likely that this Abinadab was a Levite".[17] The ark remained in his care for twenty years, guarded by his son Eleazar (not to be confused with Eleazar, the son of Aaron), until it was at length removed by David.[18]
  2. The second of the eight sons of Jesse.[19] He was with Saul in the campaign against the Philistines in which Goliath was slain.[20]
  3. One of Saul's sons, who perished with his father in the battle of Gilboa.[21]
  4. Ben-abinadab; One of Solomon's officers, who "provided victuals for the king and his household". He presided for this purpose over the region of Dor and had Taphath a daughter of Solomon as his wife.[22]

AbiasaphEdit

Abiasaph (Hebrew אֲבִיאָסָף "my father has gathered") was a son of Korah of the house of Levi according to Exodus 6:24, born in Egypt. Ebiasaph is a spelling variation of Abiasaph.

AbielEdit

Abiel (Hebrew אֲבִיאֵל "my father is God") was the name of two individuals mentioned in the Bible:

AbimaelEdit

In Genesis 10:28, Abimael is the ninth of the 13 sons of Joktan, a descendant of Shem. He is also mentioned in 1 Chronicles 1:22. Abimael means "God is a father."[23]

AbitubEdit

The name Abitub or Abitob appears only once in the Hebrew Bible, in 1 Chronicles 8:11, where it is used for a character said to be the son of Shaharaim, in a section on the descendants of Benjamin.[24]

AdahEdit

Hebrew: עָדָה, Modern ʿAda, Tiberian ʿĀḏāh; adornment[25]

  1. the first wife of Lamech, and the mother of Jabal and Jubal. (Genesis 4:19-23)
  2. the first wife of Esau, the daughter of Elon the Hittite. It has been suggested by biblical scholars that she is the same person as "Bashemath the daughter of Elon the Hittite" mentioned as a wife of Esau in Genesis 26.[26][27] She bore Esau's firstborn Eliphaz, and became the matriarch of the Edomites. (Genesis 26:34,36:2-4)

The Order of the Eastern Star considers Adah also to be the name of the daughter of Jephthah, although the Bible does not name her.

AdaliaEdit

Mentioned only in Esther 9:8, Adalia is the fifth of the Persian noble Haman's ten sons.[28] Adalia was slain along with his nine siblings in Susa. In various manuscripts of the Septuagint, his name is given as Barsa, Barel, or Barea.[28]

AdbeelEdit

Adbeel (Hebrew אַדְבְּאֵל "disciplined by God") Nadbeel or Idiba’ilu, was the third son of Ishmael out of twelve. (Genesis 25:13) The name Adbeel is associated with the personal name and northwest tribe in Arabia known as Idiba’ilu, whom Tiglath-Pileser conquered in the 8th century BCE. (Kenneth A. Mathews, 2005, p. 361)[clarification needed]

AdinaEdit

In 1 Chronicles 11:42, Adina (lit. Slender) is listed as one of the "mighty men" of David's army. Adina was the son of a chief of the Reubenites named Shiza.

AdlaiEdit

Adlai is in Hebrew עַדְלָי, meaning "refuge". In 1 Chronicles 27:29, he is the father of Shaphat, and the grandfather of the prophet Elisha. He is mentioned only in this verse.

AdmathaEdit

Mentioned only in Esther 1:14, Admatha is an advisor to Ahasuerus of Persia.[29] According to one theory, the verse has suffered from scribal error, and as it originally stood Admatha was instead Hamdatha, not an adviser to Ahaseurus but the father of Haman.[29]

AdminEdit

In some translations of Luke 3:33, Admin is an ancestor of Jesus, the father of Aminadab and son of Arni.[30]

AdnaEdit

Adna is the name of two biblical characters.[31] The first is one of the men in the Book of Ezra who took foreign wives.[32] The second is a priest, named as the head of the priestly family Harim in the time of Joiakim.[33]

AdnahEdit

Adnah is the name of at least two individuals in the Hebrew Bible.[34]

  1. Adnah, called Ednaas or Ednas in Septuagint manuscripts, is credited with being a commander of 300,000 soldiers in the army of Jehoshaphat.[34] He is found in 2 Chronicles 17:14. His name is spelled with a final He.[34]
  2. Adnah, called Edna in the Septuagint, refers to a member of the Tribe of Manasseh who deserted Saul to support David.[34] His name is spelled with either a final He or else a Heth, depending on the manuscript.[34]

AduelEdit

Aduel, according to the Book of Tobit 1:1, was the great-grandfather of Tobit. The Book of Tobit is included in some Christian Bibles, but it is not included in Bibles historically used by Jews and most Protestants. Cheyne and Black claim that "Aduel" is "no doubt another form of Adiel."[35]

AediasEdit

Aedias, a descendant of Ela, appears in 1 Esdras 9:27 as one of the men found to have married foreign women. 1 Esdras appears in some Christian Bibles, but not in the Bibles used by Jews and most Protestants. In the parallel verse in the Book of Ezra, 10:26, the name "Elijah" is found.[36]

AgeeEdit

Agee was the father of Shammah, who was one of David's mighty men (II Samuel 23:11). Based on interpretations of I Chronicles 11:34 and II Samuel 23:32-33 Agee was either the grandfather of Jonathan or his brother. According to Cheyne and Black, his name is a scribal mistake, and should read "Ela"; he is the same as the Ela mentioned in 1 Kings 4:18.[37]

AggabaEdit

For the Aggaba of 1 Esdras 5:29, see Hagabah.

AhabEdit

Ahab (Hebrew: אָחאַב, which means "brother/father") is the name of at least two biblical figures:

  • Ahab, seventh king of Israel
  • Ahab, son of Koliah, who, according to Jeremiah 29:21, was labeled a false prophet by YHVH [38]

AharhelEdit

In 1 Chronicles 4:8, Aharhel (Hebrew אֲחַרְחֵל "behind the rampart") is the son of Harum of the tribe of Judah.

AhasaiEdit

See Ahzai.

AhasbaiEdit

Ahasbai, the son of the Maachathite, was the father of Eliphelet, one of King David's Warriors (2 Samuel 23:34).

AhiEdit

(Hebrew אֲחִי "brother/kindred of YHWH")

  • Ahi is the son of Abdiel in 1 Chronicles 5:15
  • Ahi is the son of Shomer in 1 Chronicles 7:34

AhianEdit

Ahian is the name given to a descendant of Manasseh in the tribal genealogies of 1 Chronicles.[39] The name appears only in a single time in the Bible.[40]

AhiezerEdit

Ahiezer the son of Ammishaddai was the leader of the tribe of Dan and one of the leaders of the tribes of Israel mentioned in several places in the Book of Numbers.

AhiludEdit

Ahilud is the father of Jehoshaphat, who serves as court recorder to David (2 Samuel 8:16) and Solomon (1 Kings 4:3). In 1 Kings 4:12, Ahilud is the father of Baana, an official in Solomon's court sent to gather provisions in Taanach and Megiddo, and Beth Shan.

AhimothEdit

Ahimoth appears in 1 Chronicles 6:25 (verse 10 in some Bibles). It is the name given for one of the descendants of Kehath the son of Levi.

AhinadabEdit

Ahinadab (Hebrew: אחינדב Ahinadav "my brother Is noble" or "my brother has devoted himself"),[41] son of Iddo, is one of the twelve commissariat officers appointed by Solomon to districts of his kingdom to raise supplies by monthly rotation for his household. He was appointed to the district of Mahanaim (1 Kings 4:14), east of Jordan.

AhiramEdit

Ahiram was a son of Benjamin according to Numbers 26:38.

AhisamachEdit

Ahisamach or Ahisamakh, also Ahis'amach (Hebrew: אחיסמך "brother of support"), of the tribe of Dan, was the father of Aholiab according to Exodus 31:6, Exodus 35:34, and Exodus 38:23.

AhishaharEdit

Ahishahar is the name given to a third-generation descendant of Benjamin (the eponymous forefather of the Tribe of Benjamin) in 1 Chronicles 7:10. This figure is mentioned nowhere else in the Hebrew Bible.[42]

AhisharEdit

Ahishar (אחישר in Hebrew; meaning Brother of song, or singer), the officer who was "over the household" of Solomon (1 Kings 4:6).

AhitubEdit

Ahitub is the name of multiple minor biblical figures.

  1. Ahitub, son of Phinehas, grandson of Eli, and brother of Ichabod. (1Samuel 14:3,22:9-20, 1Chronicles 9:11)
  2. Ahitub, son of Amariah and father of Zadok. (2Samuel 8:15-17)
  3. Ahitub, a descendant through the priestly line of the first Zadok. He was an ancestor of later high priests who served during the fall of Jerusalem and post-exile. (1Chronicles 6:11-12)
  4. Ahitub, a Benjamite. (1Chronicles 8:11)

AhlaiEdit

Ahlai is a name given to two individuals in the Books of Chronicles. In the opinion of Thomas Kelly Cheyne, the name is probably derived from "Ahiel" or a similar name.[43]

AhuzzamEdit

Ahuzzam or Ahuzam is the name of one of the sons of "Asshur, the father of Tekoa," in a genealogy describing the desceandants of the Tribe of Judah.[44] He is mentioned only in 1 Chronicles 4:6.[45]

AhuzzathEdit

Ahuzzath or Ahuzzah[46] is the name given to an associate of Abimelech, king of Gerar, in Genesis 26:26. According to the Book of Genesis, Ahuzzath accompanied Abimelech when Abimelech went to make a treaty with Isaac. He is mentioned nowhere else in the Hebrew Bible.[47]

AhzaiEdit

Ahzai (KJV Ahasai) is a name which appears only in Nehemiah 11:13, where it is mentioned in passing.[48] The verse refers to a priest, called "Amashsai son of Azarel son of Ahzai son of Meshillemoth son of Immer." In the parallel name in 1 Chronicles 9:12, the name "Jahzerah" replaces "Ahzai."[48]

AiahEdit

Aiah (איה "Falcon") was the father of Rizpah, mentioned in 2 Samuel 3:7

AjahEdit

In Genesis 36:24 and 1 Chronicles 1:40, Ajah [איה] is a son of Zibeon. Ajah means hawk. Alternative spelling: Aiah.

AkanEdit

In Genesis 36:27 Akan is a son of Ezer and grandson of Seir the Horite. In 1 Chronicles 1:42 he is called Jaakan.

AkkubEdit

In Ezra 2:45, Akkub is the head of a family of Nethinim. In 1 Chronicles 3:24, Akkub is a son of Elionenai, descendant of Solomon living in the Kingdom of Judah. In 1 Chronicles 9:17, Ezra 2:42, and Nehemiah 7:45, Akkub is a Levite gatekeeper at the Temple in Jerusalem after the return from the Babylonian captivity.

AlexanderEdit

Alexander was a member of the Sanhedrin named in Acts 4:6 as part of a group before whom Peter and John were required to give an account of their healing power, following their arrest on the day of Pentecost.

AllonEdit

In 1 Chronicles 4:37, Allon is the son of Jedaiah, of the family of the Simeonites, who expelled the Hamites from the valley of Gedor.

AlvahEdit

In Genesis 36:40, Alvah is a chief of Edom and a descendant of Esau. In 1 Chronicles 1:51 he is called Aliah.

AlvanEdit

In Genesis 36:23, Alvan is the eldest son of Shobal and a descendant of Seir the Horite. In 1 Chronicles 1:40 he is called Alian.

AmasaEdit

In 2 Chr 28:1-4, Amasa is the son of Hadlai, and one of the leaders of Ephraim (2 Chr 28:12) during the reign of the evil King Ahaz.

AmasiahEdit

In 2 Chronicles 17:16, Amasiah (meaning burden of Jehovah) was the son of Zichri, a captain under King Jehoshaphat.

AmaziahEdit

In Amos 7:10, Amaziah is a priest of Bethel who confronts Amos and rejects his prophesying against king Jeroboam II. As a result, Amos is led to prophesy the doom of Amaziah's family, the loss of his land and his death in exile. Jonathan Magonet has described Amaziah as 'a spiritual leader who believed in his own power and could not risk hearing the word of God'.[49]

AmminadibEdit

A person mentioned in the Old Testament in Song of Solomon 6:12, whose chariots were famed for their swiftness. It is rendered in the margin "my willing people," and in the Revised Version "my princely people."

AmmizabadEdit

Ammizabad was the son of Benaiah, who was the third and chief captain of the host under David (1 Chronicles 27:6).

AmonEdit

Amon (Hebrew: אמן 'aMoN) was a city governor in the time of Kings Jehoshaphat and Ahab[50]

AmosEdit

The 10th generation grandfather of Jesus through Joseph, according to Luke 3:25.

AmziEdit

Amzi ('am-tsee') is a masculine Hebrew name meaning "my strength" or "strong." Two individuals with this name are mentioned in the Bible:

AnahEdit

In the Book of Genesis, there are two men and one woman named Anah.

AnaiahEdit

Anaiah, a name meaning "Yahweh has answered," appears only twice in the Hebrew Bible, with both appearances in Nehemiah.[51] The first appearance describes Ezra, a Jewish reformer, standing up to give a speech, with thirteen other people standing beside him. Anaiah is listed as one of those standing by.[52] The second appearance of the name is in a list of people who signed a covenant between God and the Jewish people.[53]

AnakEdit

Anak was the father of Ahiman, Sheshai, and Talmai in Numbers 13:22

AnanEdit

Anan was one of the Israelites who sealed the covenant after the return from Babylon[54] (Nehemiah 10:26).

AnaniEdit

Anani is a name which appears in a genealogy in Chronicles.[55] It refers to a descendant of Zerubbabel. According to the Masoretic Text Anani was born six generations after Zerubbabel. For scholars, this six-generation span after Zerubbabel is the terminus a quo for the date of Chronicles—it implies that Chronicles could not have been written earlier than about 400 BCE.[56] In the Septuagint, Anani is listed as eleven generations removed from Zerubbabel. For scholars who believe that the Septuagint reading for Anani's genealogy is correct, this places the earliest possible date for the writing of Chronicles at about 300 BCE.[56]

AntothijahEdit

Antothijah or Anthothijah is a name which appears only once in the Hebrew Bible, in a genealogical section listing descendants of Benjamin.[57][58] It is most likely an adjective used to describe a female person from the town of Anathoth.[58] Manuscripts of the Greek Septuagint give the name as Anothaith, Anathothia, Athein, or Anathotha.[58]

AphiahEdit

Aphiah, of the tribe of Benjamin, was an ancestor of King Saul and of his commander Abner. According to Saul, his family was the least of the tribe of Benjamin.[59]

AppaimEdit

Appaim is a minor figure who appears in 1 Chronicles 2:30 and 31. He appears briefly in a genealogy of Jerahmeelites, in which he is the father Ishi, son of Appaim, son of Nadab, son of Shammai, son of Onam, son of Jerahmeel. In manuscripts of the Septuagint, he is called Ephraim, Aphphaim, or Opheim.[60]

ArahEdit

Arah is the name of two minor biblical figures. The name may mean "wayfarer."[61]

ArdEdit

Ard (Hebrew ארד) was the tenth son of Benjamin in Genesis 46:21. It is relatively unusual among Hebrew names for ending in a cluster of two consonants instead of as a segholate.

AreliEdit

Areli was a son of Gad according to Genesis 46:16 and Numbers 26:17. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

AristobulusEdit

Aristobulus is apparently the patriarch of a household; Paul of Tarsus instructed his followers to greet "those who belong to the household of Aristobulus". Romans 16:10.

ArnanEdit

Arnan was a descendant of David, father of Obadiah, and son of Rephaiah.

ArodiEdit

Arodi or Arod was a son of Gad according to Genesis 46:16 and Numbers 26:17. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

AsareelEdit

Asareel, according to a genealogical passages in the Book of Chronicles, was the son of a figure named Jehaleleel or Jehallelel.[65] Asareel and Jehaleleel are mentioned only briefly, in a section of the genealogies adjacent to the descendants of Caleb, although the relationship between them and the descendants of Caleb is uncertain.[66][67]

AshbelEdit

Ashbel (Hebrew, אשבל) is the third of the ten sons of Benjamin named in Genesis. He founded the tribe of Ashbelites.[68]

AsielEdit

Asiel is listed as one of the descendants of Simeon in 1 Chronicles 4:35.

AsrielEdit

Asriel was a son of Manasseh according to Numbers 26:31, Joshua 17:2, and 1 Chronicles 7:14.

AssirEdit

Assir was a son of Korah of the house of Levi according to Exodus 6:24, born in Egypt. It was also the firstborn son of Jehoiachin, King of Judah.

AthaiahEdit

Athaiah the son of Uzziah is a person listed in Nehemiah as a Judahite inhabitant of Jerusalem.[69] The meaning of the name is uncertain.[70]

AthlaiEdit

Athlai, a descendant of Bebai, is listed in the book of Ezra[71] as one of the men who married foreign women. The name is a contraction of "Athaliah."[72] In the equivalent list in 1 Esdras,[73] the name "Amatheis" or "Ematheis" appears in the same place.[72]

AzaliahEdit

Azaliah is mentioned in passing as the father of the scribe Shaphan in 2 Kings 22:3 and the copy of the same verse found in 2 Chronicles 34:8. The name means "Yahweh has reserved."[74]

AzaniahEdit

Azaniah is mentioned in passing in Nehemiah 10:9 (10 in some Bibles) as the name the father of Levite who signed the covenant of Nehemiah. The name means "Yahweh listened."[75]

AzariahEdit

Azariah (Hebrew - עזריהו azaryahu "God Helped"), son of Nathan, was appointed by King Solomon to be over his deputies. I Kings 4:5. For Azariah the priest see Azariah (high priest).

AzgadEdit

Azgad is the name of a Levite who signed Ezra's covenant.[76] The name means "Gad is strong."[77]

AzielEdit

See Jaaziel.

AzzanEdit

Azzan (Hebrew עַזָּן "strong") was the father of Paltiel, a prince of the Tribe of Issachar. (Num. 34:26).

BEdit

BaanahEdit

(Hebrew: בַעֲנָא)

  • Baanah the Netophathite was the father of Heleb, one of King David's Warriors (2 Samuel 23:29, 1 Chronicles 11:30).
  • Baanah the son of Ahilud, was one of Solomon's twelve regional administrators, having jurisdiction over Taanach, Meggido, and Beth-shean (I Kings 4:12).
  • Baanah the son of Hushai, was one of Solomon's twelve regional administrators, having jurisdiction over Asher and [Bealoth|Aloth] (I Kings 4:16).

BaaraEdit

Baara was one of the three wives of Shaharaim, according to 1 Chronicles 8:8.

BarachelEdit

Barachel was a Buzite, and was the father of Elihu, an antagonist of Job, according to Job 32:2.

BarkosEdit

Barkos was a painter who was the father of some of the Nethinim, according to Ezra 2:53.

BarzillaiEdit

Barzillai [ברזלי "Iron-like"] the Gileadite of Rogelim was 80 years old at the time of Absalom's revolt against King David. Barzillai supplied provisions for David's army at Mahanaim (2 Samuel 17:27-29). After the death of Absalom, being an old man, he was unable to accompany the king back to Jerusalem, but brought Chimham to David for the return journey (2 Samuel 19:31-37).

Another figure who married one of Barzillai's daughters was called Barzellai as a result (Ezra 2:61; Nehemiah 7:63). In 1 Esdras 5:38, he is called Zorzelleus.

BasemathEdit

Hebrew: Sweet-smelling or Sweet-smile

  1. Basemath, wife of Esau, and daughter of Elon the Hittite (Genesis 26:34). She is thought to be identical to or a sister to Adah who is mentioned in Genesis 36.[78]
  2. Basemath, another wife of Esau, daughter of Ishmael, sister to Nebajoth and mother of Reuel (Genesis 36:3). She is thought by some scholars to be the same as Mahalath of Genesis 28.
  3. Basemath, the daughter of Solomon; a wife of Ahimaaz. (1Kings 4:15)

BecherEdit

Becher was the name of two individuals mentioned in the Bible:

BechorathEdit

Bechorath, son of Aphiah, of the tribe of Benjamin, was an ancestor of King Saul and of his commander Abner. According to Saul, his family was the least of the tribe of Benjamin. (1 Samuel 9)

BelaEdit

Hebrew: בלע BeLa` "Crooked"

Bela was the name of three individuals mentioned in the Bible:

Ben AbinadabEdit

Ben Abinadab (Hebrew בנ אבינדב BeN ,'aḄYNaDaḄ "My Father is Liberal"), was one of King Solomon's twelve regional administrators; he was over Dor, and he was married to Taphath, a daughter of Solomon. I Kings 4:11 (RSV).

Ben-AmmiEdit

Ben-Ammi (Hebrew בן־עמי for "son of my people" [79]) was the son of Lot and his youngest daughter. He became the father of the Ammonites (see Genesis 19:36-38).

Ben DekerEdit

Ben Dekar (Hebrew בנ דקר BeN DeQeR "Son of Pick"), was one of King Solomon's twelve regional administrators; he was over Makaz, Shaalbim, Beth-shemesh, and Elon-beth-hanan. I Kings 4:9 (RSV).

Ben GeberEdit

Ben Geber (Hebrew בנ גבר BeN GeḄeR "Son of He-Man"), was one of King Solomon's twelve regional administrators; he was over Ramoth Gilead and Argob. I Kings 4:13 (RSV).

Ben HesedEdit

Ben Hesed (Hebrew בנ חסד ben hesed "Son of Grace"), was one of King Solomon's twelve regional administrators; he was over Aruboth, Sochoh, and Hepher. I Kings 4:10 (RSV).

Ben HurEdit

Ben Hur (Hebrew בנ חור Ben Hur "Son of Hur") was one of King Solomon's twelve regional administrators; he was over Ephraim. I Kings 4:8 (RSV).

BenoEdit

Beno was the son of Merari and from Jaaziah 1 Chronicles 24:26-27.

BeriahEdit

Beriah is the name of four different biblical individuals:

  • One of Asher's four sons, and father of Heber and Malchiel.[80]
  • A son of Ephraim (1 Chr. 7:20-23), born after the killing of Ephraim's sons Ezer and Elead, and so called by his father "because disaster had befallen his house."[81]
  • A Benjamite, son of Elpaal. He and his brother Shema expelled the Gittites, and were patriarchs to the inhabitants of Ajalon. His sons were Michael, Ishpah and Joha. (1 Chr. 8:13)
  • A Levite, the son of Shimei. He was jointly patriarch of a clan with his brother Jeush. (1 Chr. 23:10-11)

BidkarEdit

Bidkar (Hebrew: בדקר) was an officer of the Israelite king Jehu. Jehu ordered Bidkar to throw the body of the king he usurped, Jehoram, into the field of Naboth, fulfilling prophecy. II Kings 9:25

BigthaEdit

Bigtha is one of the eunuchs who served King Xerxes in Esther 1:10.

BirshaEdit

Birsha is the king of Gomorrah in Genesis 14 who joins other Canaanite city kings in rebelling against Chedorlaomer.

BukkiEdit

Bukki was a prince of the tribe of Dan; one of those appointed by Moses to superintend the division of Canaan amongst the tribe (Num. 34:22).

CEdit

Caleb, son of HezronEdit

This is about the Caleb mentioned only in 1 Chronicles 2:18. For the better-known Caleb son of Jephunneh, see Caleb.

See Caleb (son of Hezron).

CarmiEdit

Carmi refers to two individuals mentioned in the Bible:

CarshenaEdit

Carshena or Karshena is a name which appears in a list of high-ranking officials in the court of king Ahasuerus in Esther 1:14. It is derived from the Persian warkačīnā, meaning "wolfish."[82]

ChalcolEdit

Chalcol the son of Darda (Hebrew כלכל kalkol - the same consonants with different vowel points (kilkayl) mean "maintain") is listed in 1 Kings 4:31 as an example of a very wise man who is, nevertheless, not as wise as Solomon. Another person with the same Hebrew name (though spelled "Calcol" in the King James Version) is listed in 1 Chronicles as the son of Zerah, the son of Judah (son of Jacob).[83]

ChelalEdit

See Kelal.

ChelluhEdit

Chelluh, Cheluhi, or Cheluhu is the name given in Ezra 10:35 for one of the men who married foreign women.[84]

ChelubEdit

Two individuals by the name of Chelub are mentioned in the Hebrew Bible.

  • A descendant of Judah, called "brother of Shuhah" in 1 Chronicles 4:11, in a genealogical passage listing descendants of Judah. According to the Encyclopaedia Biblica (1899), this "Chelub" is the biblical figure better known as Caleb.[85]
  • An Ezri son of Chelub was an overseer of agricultural work in the time of king David according to 1 Chronicles 27:26.

ChenaanahEdit

Chenaanah is the name of two biblical figures.

  • In a genealogical section of Chronicles concerned with the Tribe of Benjamin, a Chenaanah son of Bilhan is mentioned.[86]
  • The false prophet Zedekiah is called "son of Chenaanah."[87]

ChenaniahEdit

Chenaniah, according to Chronicles, was a Levite leader in the time of David.[88] The Hebrew text is unclear as to whether he was in charge of something to do with singing or with the carrying of the ark.[89]

ChimhamEdit

Chimham, Chimhan [90] or Kimham [91] was a servant nominated by Barzillai to accompany King David to Gilgal during his return to Jerusalem after the death of Absalom. (2 Samuel 19:37-40)

The name also refers to a place near Bethlehem where Johanan regrouped before departing to Egypt.[92]

ChislonEdit

Chislon was the father of Elidad, a prince of the Tribe of Benjamin. (Num. 34:21)

ChuzaEdit

Chuza was the manager of Herod Antipas' household. His wife, Joanna, was a follower of Jesus (see Luke 8:1-3).

ClaudiaEdit

Claudia was an associate of Paul the Apostle who greeted Saint Timothy in 2 Timothy 4:21.

DEdit

DalphonEdit

Dalphon (Hebrew דַּלְפוֹן "to weep") was one of the ten sons of Haman, killed along with Haman by the Jews of Persia, according to Esther 9:7.

DardaEdit

Darda (Hebrew דַּרְדַּע) was one of the exemplars of wisdom than whom Solomon was wiser.[93] In 1 Chronicles 2:6, his name is misspelled as "Dara."[94]

DelaiahEdit

Delaiah (דליהו "drawn out by YHWH").[95] is the name of several biblical persons:

  • Kohenic family, one of the Twenty-four Priestly divisions
  • Son of Shemaiah, and officer to King Jehoiakim of Judah. He was one of the officers present at the delivery of a scroll sent by Jeremiah, (Jer. 36:12) and one of those who asked the king not to burn the scroll. (ibid. 36:25)
  • Son of Elioenai, a descendant of the royal Davidic line through Jeconiah. (1 Chr. 3:24)
  • The head of a family that came up from the Babylonian exile with Zerubbabel, that was unable to give its ancestral genealogy. (Ezr. 2:60, Neh. 7:62)
  • Son of Mehetabel and father of Shemaiah. (Neh. 6:10) He is probably identical to the previous entry.

DeuelEdit

Deuel (Hebrew דְּעוּאֵל) was the father of Eliasaph the leader of the Tribe of Gad, as noted in four verses in the Book of Numbers: Numbers 1:14; 7:42,47; 10:20. However, in Numbers 2:14 this Eliasaph is called "the son of Reuel."

DiblaimEdit

Diblaim (Hebrew דִּבְלָ֫יִם "cakes of pressed figs") was the mother of the prophet Hosea's wife, Gomer. Her name means 'doubled cakes'. (Hosea 1:3)

DibriEdit

Dibri, a Danite, was the father of Shelomith, according to Leviticus 24:11. Shelomith's son was stoned to death by the people of Israel for blasphemy following Moses' issue of a ruling[96] on the penalty to be applied for blasphemy.

DiklahEdit

Diklah was a son of Joktan according to Genesis 10:27, 1 Chronicles 1:21.

DodavahuEdit

Dodavahu or Dodavah, according to Chronicles, was the father of Eliezer, a prophet.[97]

DishanEdit

Dishan (Hebrew דִּישׁוֹן dishon) was the youngest son of Seir the Horite. (Genesis 36:21)

DodoEdit

Dodo (Hebrew דּוֹדוֹ dodo from דּוֹד dod meaning "beloved" or "father's brother") is a name given to three persons in the Bible:

EEdit

EbedEdit

  • The father of Gaal, mentioned in Judges 9.
  • The son of Jonathan, one of the heads of household who returned from the Babylonian exile in the Book of Ezra (Ezra 1:6).

Ebed-melechEdit

Ebed-melech (Hebrew: עבד-מלך eved-melekh "slave of the king"), the Ethiopian eunuch, intervened with king Zedekiah on behalf of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 38:7ff)

EglahEdit

Eglah was one of David's wives and the mother of Ithream, according to II Samuel 3:4.

EhiEdit

In Genesis 46:21, Ehi is the third son of Benjamin. In 1 Chronicles 8:1 he is called Aharah, and in Numbers 26:38 he is called Ahiram.

ElasahEdit

Elasah or Eleasah (Hebrew: אלעשה meaning 'made by God') was the name of four individuals mentioned in the Bible:

  • The son of Shaphan, who was chosen by King Zedekiah of Judah to be one of the two messengers to take Jeremiah's letter to Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 29:3) He was probably the brother of Ahikam, who had taken Jermiah's part at the time of his arrest after the temple sermon [98]
  • One of the sons of Pashur who was rebuked for marrying a foreign women (Ezra 10:18-19)
  • The son of Helez, a Jerahmeelite (1 Chronicles 2:39-40). He is called "Eleasah" in the King James Bible.[99]
  • A descendant of Saul according to 1 Chronicles 8:37. He is called "Eleasah" in the King James Bible.[99]

EldaahEdit

Eldaah appears as one of the sons of Midian (son of Abraham) in Genesis 25:4 and 1 Chronicles 1:33.

EleadEdit

Elead appears in 1 Chronicles 7:21 as the name of a man who, along with his brother Ezer, is killed by farmers near Philistine the city of Gath. It is unclear whether Elead is intended by the Chronicler as the son or a later descendant of Ephraim, and it is likewise uncertain whether this Elead is the same figure as the Eleadah mentioned in the previous verse.[100]

EleasahEdit

See Elasah.

EliadaEdit

Eliada (rendered once as Eliadah by the King James Bible) is the name of three individuals in the Hebrew Bible.

  • The son of David, who was originally called Beeliada.[101]
  • A Benjamite captain in the time of king Jehoshaphat.[102]
  • The father of Rezon the Syrian, spelled "Eliadah" in the King James Version.

EliadahEdit

See Eliada.

EliphalEdit

Eliphal son of Ur is listed as one of David's Mighty Warriors in 1 Chronicles 11:35. In the corresponding place in Samuel's version of the list (2 Samuel 23:34), he is called "Eliphelet son of Ahasbai the Maachathite." According to the Encyclopaedia Biblica, the name "Eliphal" (Hebrew ʾlypl ) is copyist's error for "Eliphelet" ( ʾlyplt ) caused by dropping the final letter in the name.[103][104]

ElipheletEdit

Eliphelet is a Hebrew name meaning "God is a deliverance." [103] It is the name of several figures in the Hebrew Bible, and appears under several spellings.[103][105]

  • Eliphelet is the name given to a son of David in 2 Samuel 5:16, and 1 Chronicles 3:8 and 14:7. Due to a textual error, Chronicles records Eliphelet twice, as if it were the name of two different sons of David.[103]
  • Eliphal, son of Ur (2 Samuel 23:34) or Ahasbai (1 Chronicles 11:35), is listed as one of David's Mighty Warriors. The Encyclopaedia Biblica claims that "Eliphal" is likely a scribal error for "Eliphelet."[103]
  • Eliphal son of Eshek appears in a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:39).
  • An Eliphelet is named among the "descendants of Adonikam," one of the groups that returned with Ezra from the Babylonian captivity according to Ezra 8:13.
  • An Eliphelet, one of the "descendants of Hashum," is listed as one of the men who married foreign women according to Ezra 10:33.

EliasaphEdit

Eliasaph was the name of two individuals mentioned in the Bible:

EliathahEdit

Eliathah is the name given in 1 Chronicles 25:4 to one of the "fourteen sons" of Heman. According to 25:27, he gave his name to one of the twenty-four classes of temple singers.

ElidadEdit

Elidad was a prince of the tribe of Benjamin; one of those appointed by Moses to superintend the division of Canaan amongst the tribe (Numbers 34: 21).

ElienaiEdit

Elienai, one of the nine sons of Shimei, appears in a genealogical passage as a descendant of Benjamin in 1 Chronicles 8:20. The consonants which make up the Hebrew name are only in this one passage read as Elienai; elsewhere the pronunciation is Elioenai.[106]

ElihorephEdit

Elihoreph (Hebrew אליחרף) was a scribe in King Solomon's court. He was a son of Shisha and brother of Ahiah. (I Kings: 4:3) The name means "'my God repays,' or 'my God is the giver of the autumn harvest,'".[107]

ElimelechEdit

Elimelech was the husband of Naomi. Together they had two sons, Mahlon and Chilion. He was originally a resident of Bethlehem before moving to Moab with his family, where he died (see Ruth 1:1-3). All of his property was later purchased by Boaz (see Ruth 4:9).

ElioenaiEdit

Elioenai is the name of several minor persons found in the Hebrew Bible.

  • An Elioenai appears in 1 Chronicles 3:23-24: the son of Neariah, the son of Shemaiah, the son of Shecaniah, a descendant of king Jeconiah.
  • A clan leader in the Tribe of Simeon, according to 1 Chronicles 4:36.
  • Elioenai son of Becher, a descendant of the Tribe of Benjamin according 1 Chronicles 7:8.
  • A descendant of Pashhur, one of the priests listed as having married foreign women (Ezra 10:22).
  • A descendant of Zattu, also listed with those who had foreign wives (Ezra 10:27).
  • A priest involved in the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem according to Nehemiah 12:41. This may be the same as the descendant of Passhur (above).[108]
  • Elioenai or Elihoenai, son of Meshelemiah, son of Korah (1 Chronicles 26:3).

ElionenaiEdit

Elionenai was a descedant of David. He was the father of Akkub, and son of Neariah.

ElishamaEdit

Elishama (Hebrew: אלישמע my God heard) was the name of several biblical characters, including:

ElishaphatEdit

Elishaphat, son of Zichri, was one of the "captains of hundreds" associated with Jehoiada in restoring king Jehoash to the throne 2 Chronicles 23:1.

ElishebaEdit

Elisheba ("God is my oath", cognate to the name Elizabeth) is the wife of Aaron and sister-in-law of Moses. Her sons were Nadab, Abihu, Eleazer and Ithamar. (Exodus 6:23).

ElizaphanEdit

Elizaphan was a prince of the tribe of Zebulun; one of those appointed by Moses to superintend the division of Canaan amongst the tribe (Num. 34:25).

ElizurEdit

Elizur was a son of Shedeur and a prince of the House of Reuben according to Numbers 1:5, and one of the leaders of the tribes of Israel. He appears only in the Book of Numbers, in five verses (1:5; 2:10; 7:30, 35; 10:18).[109]

ElmadamEdit

Elmadam or Elmodam is the name of an ancestor of Jesus, according to the genealogy found in the Gospel of Luke.[110] The Peshitta calls him Elmodad, but the Encyclopaedia Biblica suggests the reading "Elmatham," a form of the name Elnathan.[111]

ElnaamEdit

Elnaam, according to 1 Chronicles 11:46, was the father of Jeribai and Joshaviah, two of David's Mighty Warriors.

ElnathanEdit

Elnathan (Hebrew אלנתן El-Natan "God gave") is a Hebrew name found in both Jeremiah and Ezra.

Elnathan ben Achbor of Jerusalem was the father of Nehushta. Nehushta conceived Jeconiah with King of Judah Jehoiakim. Despite this close relationship to the king, Elnathan is one of those who, according to Jeremiah 36:25 opposes Jehoiakim when he cuts up and burns a scroll that had been brought to him, containing Jeremiah's prophesies of the forthcoming destruction of Judah. Elnathan's father Achbor was a strong supporter of the earlier reforms of king Josiah, which may have influenced[112] Elnathan's behaviour - though he had earlier been closely involved in the persecution of the prophet Uriah ben Shemaiah, according to Jeremiah 26:20-23.

In Ezra 8:16, the name Elnathan occurs three times. "Then sent I for Eliezer, for Ariel, for Shemaiah, and for Elnathan, and for Jarib, and for Elnathan, and for Nathan, and for Zechariah, and for Meshullam, chief men; also for Joiarib, and for Elnathan, which were teachers" (Revised Version). According to Donna Laird, the repetition of Elnathan, and the similarity between the names Jarib and Joiarib, may indicate a copyist's accidental repetition.[113]

ElonEdit

Elon (Hebrew: אֵילֹן, Modern Elon, Tiberian ʼÊlōn; "Oak") was the name of two individuals mentioned in the Bible:

ElpaalEdit

Elpaal is a name mentioned briefly in 1 Chronicles 8, in a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin.[114] He is recorded as the son of a woman named Hushim, the wife of a man named Shaharaim. The relationship between Shaharaim and Benjamin is not spelled out by the Chronicler. Elpaal is recorded as the father of people who included the builders or ancestors of the towns of Ono, Lod, and Ajalon.

ElpaletEdit

See Eliphelet (biblical figure)

ElpeletEdit

See Elpelet

EluzaiEdit

Eluzai, in 1 Chronicles 12:6,[115] is the name of a Benjamite warrior who joined the forces of David at Ziklag. The name may have meant "God is my refuge."[116]

ElzabadEdit

Elzabad is the name of two biblical figures.

  • Elzabad appears ninth in a list of eleven warriors from the Tribe of Gad who, according to 1 Chronicles 12:12, joined forces with David "at the stronghold in the wilderness."
  • Elzabad, the son of Shemaiah, the son of Obed-edom, is listed as a Korahite porter in 1 Chronicles 26:7.

ElzaphanEdit

Elzaphan was a son of Uzziel of the house of Levi according to Exodus 6:22, born in Egypt. He was a nephew of Amram and a cousin of Aaron, Miriam, and Moses. He and Mishael were asked by Moses to carry away Nadab's and Abihu's bodies to a place outside the camp. (Leviticus 10:4). In the wilderness of Sinai he was named chief of the house of Kohath (Numbers 3:30).

EnanEdit

Enan is mentioned several by way of reference to his son, "Ahira the son of Enan," who according to the Book of Numbers was the tribal leader of the Tribe of Naphtali in the time of the wilderness wanderings following the Exodus.[117]

EnochEdit

In Genesis 4:17-18, Enoch is the firstborn son of Cain and the father of Irad. Cain named the city of Enoch after his son.

EnanEdit

For the place-name containing Enan, see Hazar Enan.

Enan was a member of the house of Naphtali according to Numbers 1:15. He was the father of Ahira.

EphlalEdit

Ephlal is the name given to a Jerahmeelite found a genealogy in 1 Chronicles.[118] He is identified as the son of Zabad, the son of Nathan, the son of Attai, the son of Jarha, the son-in-law of Sheshan, the son of Ishi, the son of Appaim, the son of Nadab, the son of Shammai, the son of Onam, the son of Jerahmeel. In various manuscripts of the Greek Septuagint, the name is found in the forms Aphamel, Aphamed, and Ophlad. Stanley Arthur Cook (1899) suggested that the name might originally have been either an abbreviated form of Eliphelet, or else the name "Elpaal."[119]

EphodEdit

Ephod was the father of Hanniel, a prince of the Tribe of Manasseh. (Num. 34:23).

EphronEdit

Ephron the Hittite, son of Zohar, lived in Mamre among the children of Heth. He was the owner of the property that included the Cave of Machpelah, which he sold to Abraham for four hundred shekels of silver. (Genesis 23:8-17)

EranEdit

Eran was a son of Shuthelah of the Tribe of Ephraim according to Numbers 26:36.

EriEdit

In Genesis 46:16 Eri (עֵרי "watchful") is the son of Gad. He was the progenitor of the Erites. (Numbers 26:16)

EshekEdit

Eshek is a name which appears only once in the Hebrew Bible, in a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin.[120][121] The text of Chronicles identifies him as the brother of Azel.

EthnanEdit

Ethnan, the son of Ashur the father of Tekoa, is a figure who appears in a genealogy of the Tribe of Judah in 1 Chronicles 4:7. He may be included in the genealogy to represent Ithnan, a Judahite city mentioned in Joshua 15:23.[122]

EthniEdit

See Ethni.

EubulusEdit

Eubulus was an associate of Paul the Apostle who greeted Saint Timothy in 2 Timothy 4:21.

EviEdit

Evi was one of five Midianite kings killed during the time of Moses by an Israelite expedition led by Phinehas, son of Eleazar according to Numbers 31:8 and Joshua 13:21.

EzbonEdit

Ezbon is the name of two people mentioned in the Bible:

EzrahEdit

Ezrah is the father of Jether, Mered, Epher and Jalon, grandfather (through Mered) of Miriam, Shammai and Ishbah, and great-grandfather (through Ishbah) of Eshtemoa (1 Chr. 4:17)

GEdit

GaddiEdit

Gaddi, the son of Susi of the House of Manasseh, was a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:11.

GaddielEdit

Gaddiel, the son of Sodi of the house of Zebulun, was a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:10.

GamalielEdit

Gamaliel, son of Pedahzur was leader of the tribe of Manasseh, one of the leaders of the tribes of Israel, mentioned several times in the Book of Numbers.

GamulEdit

Gamul (Hebrew: גָמוּל‎‎; "rewarded" or "recompense") was head of the twentieth of twenty-four priestly divisions instituted by King David.[123]

GatamEdit

Gatam is a name which appears in Genesis and Chronicles in a genealogy of the Edomites. In Genesis 36:11 and 1 Chronicles 1:36, Gatam is described the "son" of Eliphaz, the son of Esau (who is according to the Bible the forefather of the Edomites). In the passages which describe Gatam as a "son" of Eliphaz, he is listed alongside his "brothers": Teman, Omar, Zepho, and Kenaz according to Genesis; a similar but slightly larger list of brothers in Chronicles (Chronicles includes Amalek as a brother of Gatam). However, in Genesis 36:16, Gatam and Amalek (along with a previously unmentioned Korah) are described not as individual sons but as "clans" of Eliphaz.[124]

GazezEdit

In the Masoretic Text of the Hebrew Bible, two individuals by the name of Gazez appear in 1 Chronicles 2:46. However, the Peshitta includes only one Gazez, and at least one biblical scholar has suggested that the second Gazez may have been included in the Masoretic Text by mistake.[125]

1. Gazez was the son of Haran, grandson of Caleb, a descendent of Jacob. His paternal grandmother was Ephah, wife of Caleb. (1Chronicles 2:46)

2. Gazez was a brother of Caleb, and uncle of 1. Gazez. (1Chronicles 2:46)

GeberEdit

Geber (Hebrew: גבר, geber), son of Uri, was one of King Solomon's regional administrators; his territory was Gilead. (First Kings 4:19)

GemalliEdit

Gemalli of the house of Dan was the father of Ammiel, a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:4.

GemariahEdit

Gemariah (Hebrew: גמריה) is the name of at least two biblical characters:

  • Gemariah son of Shaphan in chapter 36 of Jeremiah. His own son Micaiah hears Jeremiah's secretary Baruch read Jeremiah's prophecies against the nation, and reports to a meeting of the court officials, including his father, nearby. This leads to the scroll being read before king Jehoiakim, who cuts it up and burns it despite the protestations of Gemariah and Elnathan ben Achbor.[126]
  • Gemariah son of Hilkiah, one of the envoys whom King Zedekiah sent to Babylonia (Jeremiah 29:3) Nothing else is known of him; he was hardly the brother of Jeremiah, whose father was also named Hilkiah.[98]

GenubathEdit

Genubath (Hebrew: גנבת genubat "Stolen" [127]) is mentioned in I Kings 11:20 as the son born to Hadad the Edomite and the sister of Queen Tahpenes, Pharaoh's wife.

GeraEdit

Hebrew: גרא Ger'a

  • In Genesis 46:21 Gera is the fourth of ten sons of Benjamin.
  • Gera is also the name of the father of Shimei (2 Samuel 19:16)
  • Gera is also the name of two of the sons of Bela (see above), making both nephews of the earlier Gera. (1 Chronicles 8:3,5)
  • Gera is also the name of the father of Ehud, a "Benjamite, a man left-handed" - Book of Judges, 3:15.

GeuelEdit

Geuel, the son of Machi of the Tribe of Gad, was a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:16.

GinathEdit

Ginath is a name which is mentioned only in passing in a narrative describing the struggle for kingship between Omri and Tibni.[128] Tibni is referred to in 1 Kings 16:21 and 22 as "son of Ginath," which taken literally, could be read as implying that a person named Ginath was Tibni's father.[128] However, the Encyclopaedia Biblica suggests that the term "Ginath" is a place-name or clan-name, so that "Tibni son of Ginath" has the meaning "Tibni of Ginath."[128]

GuniEdit

Guni was a son of Naphtali according to Genesis 46:24 and Numbers 26:48. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

GideonEdit

Gideon was the son of Joash the Abiezrite, according to Judges 6:11. He defeated the Midianites.

GideoniEdit

Gideoni (Hebrew: גִּדְעֹנִי) was a member of the tribe of Benjamin according to Numbers 1:11. He was the father of Abidan, a tribal chief. He is mentioned five times in the Book of Numbers, with each reference stating his relation to Abidan (Num 1:11, Num 2:22, Num 7:60, Num 7:65, Num 10:24.)[129] His name is variously understood as meaning "one with a disabled hand," "a youth," or "one who cuts down trees."[129]

GilalaiEdit

Gilalai is the name of a priest who participated as a musician in a procession lead by Ezra.[130][131]

GishpaEdit

Gishpa, (KJV Gispa) was one of two leaders of the Nethinim who lived in Ophel, according to Nehemiah 11:21. There are no other mentions of the name anywhere else in the Bible.[132]

HEdit

HaahashtariEdit

Haahashtari or Ahashtari was one of the sons of Naarah, one of the two wives of Asshur (1 Chronicles 4:6). Because the name is used to refer to a family of Judahites who descend from Judah via Ashhur, Thomas Kelly Cheyne believed that the name "Haahashtari" arose from a confusion between Ha-Ashhuri ("the Ashhurite") with the obscure term ahashtranim which appears in Esther 8:10.[133]

HabaiahEdit

Habaiah (also called Hobaiah or Obdia) was the name given to a priestly family mentioned in Ezra 2:61: the b'ne habayah (literally "sons/descendants of Habaiah").[134][135] Along with the families Hakkoz and Barzillai, the Habaiah family were priests whose names were not registered in the official genealogical records.[136] As a result, Ezra ruled that their rights to serve as priests would be restricted until such time as a high priest could decide, using the oracular Urim and Thummim, whether they had divine approval to serve as priests.[137]

The name "Habaiah" means "Yahweh hides" or "Yahweh protects," and appears in manuscripts of the Greek Septuagint in the forms Labeia, Obaia, Odogia, Ebeia, Ab(e)ia, Obbeia, and Obdia. [135]

HabazziniahEdit

Habazziniah or Habaziniah was either the head of a family of Rechabites (Jeremiah 35:3), or else a place name for the location that a Rechabite lived.[138] According to Cheyne and Black, it may have been a scribal error where the name "Kabzeel," a place in the territory of Judah, was originally intended."[138]

HachmoniEdit

Hachmoni or Hakmoni is mentioned in passing in 1 Chronicles 27:32, which records that his son Yechiel, a scribe, tutored David's sons.[139]

HadadezerEdit

According to I Kings 11:23, Hadadezer (Hebrew: הדדעזר hadad`ezer "Hadad helps"[140]) was king of Zobah.

HaddadEdit

Haddad the Edomite was an adversary of Solomon (I Kings 10:14).

HadlaiEdit

Hadlai is mentioned in 2 Chronicles 28:12 as an Ephraimite, and the father of Amasa. In manuscripts of the Greek Septuagint, his name is given as Choab, Addi, or Adli.[141]

HagabEdit

Hagab (also Agaba, Accaba) is identified as the ancestor of a family of Nethinim, or temple assistants, who returned from the Babylonian exile.[142] They appear in a list with other returnees in Ezra 2:46, but are omitted in the corresponding place in Nehemiah 7:48. A Hellenized version of this name appears in a similar context in 1 Esdras 5:30.[142] In the New Testament, a prophet who appears in Acts 11:28 and 21:10 is named Agabus, a variant on the name Hagab.[142]

Hagab is a different character from Hagabah, which appears in the preceding verse.

HagabahEdit

Hagabah (also Hagaba, Graba, or Aggaba) is identified as the ancestor of a family of Nethinim, or temple assistants, who returned from the Babylonian captivity. They appear in a list with other returnees in Ezra 2:45, Nehemiah 7:48, and 1 Esdras 5:29.[143]

HaggiEdit

Haggi was a son of Gad according to Genesis 46:16 and Numbers 26:15. He was one of the 70 persons to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

HajehudijahEdit

See Jehudijah.

HakkatanEdit

Hakkatan (also Acatan, Akatan), meaning "the small one," is listed as the father of Johanan, a leader of the descendants of Azgad in Ezra 8:12 and 1 Esdras 8:38.[144] Other than these two verses, the name Hakkatan appears nowhere in the Bible.[144]

HakkozEdit

Hakkoz is the name of two or three biblical individuals:

  • Head of the seventh of twenty-four priestly divisions created by King David. (1 Chr. 24:10)
  • Head of a family of priests after the Babylonian exile. Unable to prove their lineage, the family lost its priesthood status. (Ezr. 2:61, Neh. 7:63)
  • Father of Uriah and grandfather of Meremoth, who assisted Nehemiah in rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem. (Neh. 3:4, 3:21) He is probably identical to the previous entry.

HalloheshEdit

Hallohesh or Halohesh is a name which is used twice in the Bible.[145] In a list of workers building the wall of Nehemiah, a man named "Shallum son of Hallohesh" is mentioned as having a leadership role.[146] Also in the Book of Nehemiah, a person named Hallohesh is recorded as affixing his seal (an ancient form of signature) to Ezra's covenant between God and the people living around Jerusalem.[147]

Thomas Kelly Cheyne believed that the name Hallohesh was a miswritten version of the name Hash-shilhi, (Shilhi).[145]

HammedathaEdit

Hammedatha was an Agagite and the father of Haman (see Esther 3:1).

HammolekethEdit

Hammoleketh or Hammolecheth is the sister of Machir, the eponymous ancestor of the tribe or clan of Machir (biblical region) Machir, which is reckoned as a part of the tribe of Manasseh in 1 Chronicles 7. The name appears to mean "she who reigns" if it is not a scribal error for some other name, such as Beth-Milcah.[148]

HammelechEdit

Hammelech, in the King James Version is the name of the father of Jerahmeel (Jeremiah 36:26), and it is the name of the father of Malkijah (Jeremiah 38:6). In a number of more recent translations, the Hebrew ha-melekh is taken as the common noun "the king" instead of the proper noun "Hammelech."[149]

HamorEdit

Hamor was the father of Shechem. Shechem defiled Dinah according to Genesis 34

HamulEdit

Hamul was a son of Pharez of the Tribe of Judah according to Genesis 46:12 and Numbers 26:21. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

HanameelEdit

Hanameel (Hebrew: חנמאל, which means "Grace From God"[150]) A cousin of Jeremiah from whom the latter bought property. Jeremiah 32:7ff.

HananiahEdit

Hananiah (Hebrew: חנניה, which means "My Grace is the Lord"[150]) is the name of at least two biblical characters:

  • Hananiah son of Zerubbabel, the father of Jeshaiah, was a descendant of David.
  • Hananiah son of `aZOoR, a prophet in the time of king Zedekiah. He opposed the prophet Jeremiah, was denounced by Jeremiah, and died within a year of denunciation. Jeremiah chapter 28.

HannielEdit

Hanniel Prince of the tribe of Manasseh; one of those appointed by Moses to superintend the division of Canaan amongst the tribe (Num. 34:23).

HanochEdit

Hanoch is the name of two biblical figures.[151]

  1. A son of Midian, the eponymous forefather of the Midianites.[13]
  2. A son of Reuben, the eponymous forefather of the Tribe of Reuben.[152] According to Cheyne and Black, the presence of this clan name in the genealogy of Reuben and Midian may indicate that the clan Hanoch was considered a part of the Tribe of Reuben but had a Midianite origin.[151]

HaranEdit

Haran, or Aran (Hebrew הָרָן) refers to three minor biblical people in the Hebrew Bible:

  1. Haran, son of Terah, from Ur of the Chaldees. He fathered Lot, Milcah and Iscah. (Genesis 11:27-29)
  2. Haran, son of Caleb, a descendant of Jacob, and Ephah his mother. Father of 1.Gazez, and brother of 2.Gazez. (1Chronicles 2:46)
  3. Haran, son of Shimei, a Levite who lived in the age of King David that had some important religious or political role. (1 Chronicles 23:1-9)

HarbonaEdit

Harbona or Harbonah is the name given for one the eunuchs of king Ahasuerus in Esther 1:10 and 7:9.[153]

HarephEdit

Hareph, according to 1 Chronicles 2:51, was a descendant of Caleb and the father of Beth-gader.[154] The name "Hareph" in this case may refer to a group of people otherwise referred to by the term Hariphite.[155]

HarhaiahEdit

Harhaiah, in the Masoretic Text of Nehemiah 3:8, is mentioned in passing, as being the father of Uzziel, a man responsible for the repair of part of the wall of Jerusalem. The awkward phrasing of the verse suggested to Stanley A. Cook (1899) that there had been some scribal mishandling of the verse, and that the verse originally did not contain the name "Harhaiah."[156]

HarhasEdit

Harhas, according to 2 Kings 22:14 and 2 Chronicles 34:22, was an ancestor of Shallum, the husband of the prophetess Huldah. However, where the Book of Kings has "Harhas," the Book of Chronicles reads "Hasrah."[157][158]

HarimEdit

Harim (Hebrew: חָרִם‎‎; "destroyed" or "dedicated to God") was the name of three biblical patriarchs:

  • Head of the third of twenty-four priestly divisions instituted by King David. (1 Chr. 24:8)
  • Head of a non-priestly family, with 320 members, which returned with Zerubbabel. (Ezr. 2:32, Neh. 7:35) Eight members of this family were found to have married gentile women, whom they divorced. (Ezr. 10:31) Harim's son Malchijah was one of those who helped repair the walls of Jerusalem, including the Tower of the Furnaces. (Neh. 3:11) His seal was on the renewed covenant with God made by the Babylonian returnees. (Neh. 10:28)
  • Head of a priestly family, with 1017 members, which returned with Zerubbabel. (Ezr. 2:39, Neh. 7:42) Five members of this family were found to have married gentile women, whom they divorced. (Ezr. 10:21) His seal was also on the renewed covenant. (Neh. 10:6) The head of his family at the time of the return was Adna. (Neh. 12:152)

HarnepherEdit

Harnepher appears only once in the Bible, in 1 Chronicles 7:36, in a passage which surveys the descendants of Asher.[159] The name may be of Egyptian origin, meaning "Horus is good."[159]

HarumEdit

Harum is recorded as the father of Aharhel in 1 Chronicles 4:8, which lists him as an ancestor of several clans in the Tribe of Judah.

HarumaphEdit

Harumaph is listed as the father of Jedaiah, a man responsible for making repairs to a part of Nehemiah's wall. He is only mentioned once in the Bible, in Nehemiah 3:10.[160]

HasadiahEdit

Hasadiah is listed as one of the sons of Zerubabel in 1 Chronicles 3:20, and is therefore a member of the royal lineage of the Judahite kings.

HashabiahEdit

Hashabiah is a biblical name that appears frequently for individuals mentioned after the Babylonian captivity.[161] Because the name often appears in lists without any detailed description, it is sometimes difficult to tell whether different verses that use the name are referring to the same Hashabiah or to distinct persons.[161] The following list of nine individuals is the number listed in the Encyclopaedia Biblica, though the encyclopedia does not claim that precisely nine people of this name are mentioned:

  1. A Levite of the Merarite group, mentioned 1 Chronicles 6:45 (verse 30 in some Bibles).
  2. Hashabiah son of Bunni, a Merarite Levite listed as living in Jerusalem in 1 Chronicles 9:14 and Nehemiah 11:15.
  3. A leader of a large group of people in the time of David.[162]
  4. A musician.[163]
  5. Hashabiah son of Kemuel, identified as the leader of the Levites in the time of David.[164]
  6. A Levite leader in the time of Josiah.[165]
  7. A Levite identified as having signed the covenant between Ezra and God.[166]
  8. A ruler listed as one of the people responsible for repairing the wall of Jerusalem in Nehemiah 3:17.
  9. The ruler of the clan of Hilkiah, according to Nehemiah 12:21.

HashabnahEdit

Hashabnah is the name given for one of the men who signed the covenant between the people of Judah and God in Nehemiah 10:25 (verse 26 in some Bibles). According to Cheyne and Black, the name is likely a miswritten form of "Hashabniah."[167]

HashubEdit

Hashub is mentioned in passing as the father of Shemaiah, a Levite who is listed among those living in Jerusalem after the end of the Babylonian captivity.[168]

HashubahEdit

Hashubah is listed as one of the children of Zerubabel, the governor of Yehud Medinata.[169]

HasrahEdit

Hasrah, according to 2 Chronicles 34:22, is the name of an ancestor of Shallum, the husband of the prophetess Huldah. However, where the Book of Chronicles has "Hasrah," 2 Kings 22:14 has "Harhas."[158]

HasuphaEdit

Hasupha (Hashupha in the King James Version) is the name of a clan or family of Nethinim (temple assistants) listed in Nehemiah 7:46 and Ezra 2:43.

HathachEdit

Hathach or Hatach is the name of one of the eunuchs of Ahasuerus in the Book of Esther. He acts as an messenger between Esther and Mordecai.[170]

HathathEdit

Hathath is only mentioned in 1 Chronicles 4:13, in a genealogical passage where he is the son of Othniel, the son of Kenaz.[171]

HattilEdit

The descendants of Hattil (also called Agia or Hagia) are listed in Ezra 2:57 and Nehemiah 7:59 as a group of people returning from the Babylonian captivity (see Ezra-Nehemiah). They are categorized by Ezra as being descendants of "Solomon's servants" (see Nethinim). In the Greek text of 1 Esdras 5:34, a closely related work, Hattil is referred to as Agia or Hagia.[172]

HazaiahEdit

Hazaiah is a figure mentioned in passing in Nehemiah 11:5 as an ancestor Maaseiah, a notable leader of the Tribe of Judah in Yehud Medinata.[173]

HazoEdit

Hazo was the son of Nahor and Milcah (Genesis 22:22).

HeberEdit

Heber or Chéver (Hebrew: חֶבֶר / חָבֶר, Modern Ḥéver / Ḥáver Tiberian Ḥéḇer / Ḥāḇer ; "friend", "connected") is the grandson of the patriarch Asher mentioned at Genesis 46:17 and in Numbers 26:45. Heber probably should not be confused with the Eber who was Abraham's ancestor.

HelekEdit

Helek was a son of Gilead of the Tribe of Manasseh according to Numbers 26:30 and Joshua 17:2.

HeldaiEdit

Heldai is the name of two biblical figures.[174] According to the Encyclopaedia Biblica, it should most likely be given alternate vowels as Holdai or Huldai.[174]

  1. Heldai son of Baanah the Netophathite is listed as one of David's Mighty Warriors, and also in a list of military leaders given in 1 Chronicles 27:15. He is called "Heled" in 1 Chronicles 11:30, and "Heleb" in 2 Samuel 23:29.[174]
  2. A Jew living in Babylonia, mentioned in Zechariah 6:10. He is called Helem in Zechariah 6:10.[174]

HelkaiEdit

Helkai is a name used in Nehemiah 12:15, in a list of priestly clan leaders in the "days of Joiakim."[175] The text refers to Helkai as leading a clan named Meraioth. According to the Encyclopaedia Biblica, the name is an abbreviated form of "Hilkiah."[176]

HelonEdit

Helon was a member of the house of Zebulun according to Numbers 1:9. He was the father of Eliab.

HemamEdit

Hemam or Homam is the name of the son of Lotan and grandson of Seir the Horite, according to Genesis 36:22 and 1 Chronicles 1:39.

HenadadEdit

Henadad is a biblical name which appears only in Ezra-Nehemiah. In a passage which describes the rebuilding of the wall of Jerusalem, two "sons of Henadad", Bavai and Binnui, are named as taking responsibility for portions of the wall.[177] Binnui reappears later, where he is described as a Levite and as one of the signatories of the covenant between Ezra, God, and the people of Judah.[178] The "sons of Henadad," though without any specific individuals named, are mentioned in also in Ezra 3:9, a "difficult passage".[179]

HepherEdit

Hepher was a son of Manasseh according to Numbers 26:32 and Joshua 17:2. See List of minor biblical places § Hepher.

HermogenesEdit

A Hermogenes is briefly mentioned in 2 Timothy 1:15, where he, along with someone named Phygelus, are described as having "turned away" from Paul the Apostle. Nothing more is known about Hermogenes.[180]

HezekiahEdit

This section is about the minor biblical figures named Hezekiah. For the king Hezekiah, see Hezekiah.

Hezekiah is the name of three minor figures in the Hebrew Bible. In some Bibles the variant spellings Hizkiah and Hizkijah occur.

  • A son of Neariah and descendant of David mentioned in the royal genealogy of 1 Chronicles 3.[181]
  • A figure mentioned in passing in Ezra 2:16 and Nehemiah 7:21, as the ancestor of some of the exiles who returned from the Babylonian captivity.
  • An ancestor of the prophet Zephaniah.[182]

HezronEdit

Hezron or Hetzron (Hebrew: חֶצְרוֹן, Modern Ḥetsron, Tiberian Ḥeṣrôn; "Enclosed" [183]) is the name of two men in Genesis.

HielEdit

Hiel the Bethelite (Heb. אֲחִיאֵל, חִיאֵל; "the [divine] brother, or kinsman, is God")[184]) rebuilt Jericho during the reign of King Ahab. (I Kings 16:34)

HillelEdit

  • The father of Abdon, in the Book of Judges.

HiramEdit

Hiram (Hebrew: חירם Ḥiram) of Tyre, son of a widow of the tribe of Naphtali whose father was a craftsman in bronze, was given the metal work of King Soloman's temple. I Kings 7:13-14. According to The Interpreter's Bible, Hiram is a shortened form of אחירם ('aḥîrām, "brother of Ram [the lofty one].")[185]

HobabEdit

Hobab was Moses' brother-in-law (Numbers 10:29) or father-in-law (Judges 4:11). The relevant part of Numbers 10:29 reads: "And Moses said unto Hobab, the son of Reuel the Midianite, Moses' father-in-law". That of Judges 4:11 reads: "Now Heber the Kenite had severed himself from the Kenites, even from the children of Hobab the father-in-law of Moses". Moses invited Hobab to take part in the Exodus journey into the Promised Land, wanting to make use of his local knowledge, but Hobab preferred to return home to Midian (Numbers 10:29-31).

HodEdit

Hod is a biblical name which appears only in 1 Chronicles 7:37.[186] He appears as one character in a genealogy of the Tribe of Asher.

HodaviahEdit

Hodaviah is the name of three individuals in the Bible.[187] The Revised Version and King James Version of the Bible sometimes spell it as Hodaiah, Hodevah, or Hodeiah.[187]

  • Hodaviah, a clan leader in the Tribe of Manasseh, according to 1 Chronicles 5:24.
  • Hodaviah son of Hassenuah appears as the ancestor of a Benjamite man living in Jerusalem after the Babylonian captivity.[188] This Hodaviah is called "Judah son of Hassenuah" in Nehemian 11:9.[187]
  • Hodaviah son of Elioenai is described as a descendant of Zerubbabel in 1 Chronicles 3:24

HodeshEdit

Hodesh is a figure who appears in a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin in Chronicles.[189] The name might mean "born at the feast of the new moon," or else it may be a misspelling of Ahishahar.[190]

HohamEdit

Hoham, according to the Book of Joshua, was the king of Hebron, defeated in Joshua's conquest.[191]

HomamEdit

See Hemam.

HonEdit

See On (biblical figure)

HoriEdit

Hori is the personal name of two biblical individuals, as well as being the Hebrew term for a Horite.

  • Hori of the house of Simeon was the father of Shaphat, a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:5.
  • Hori is recorded as the name of Lotan, the son of Seir the Horite, according to Genesis 36:22.

HoshamaEdit

Hoshama is the name of one of the seven sons of Jeconiah, according to 1 Chronicles 3:18, the only place in the Bible that refers to him.[192] It is a shortened version of the name "Jehoshama."[192]

HothamEdit

Hotham is the name for two individuals found in the BIble.[193] A Hotham appears in a genealogy of the Tribe of Asher in 1 Chronicles 7:32, but this individual is referred to as "Helem" in verse 35.[193] Another Hotham, though the KJV calls him Hothan, can be found in 1 Chronicles 11:44, where his sons Shama and Jeiel are listed among David's Mighty Warriors. This second Hotham is called an Aroerite.[193]

HothirEdit

Hothir is listed as a son of David's "seer" Heman in 1 Chronicles 25:4 and 28.

HubbahEdit

See Jehubbah.

HuppimEdit

Huppim (חופים) or Hupham (חופם) was the ninth son of Benjamin in Genesis 46:21 and Numbers 26:39.

HushimEdit

Hushim, according to Genesis 46:23, was the name of the sons of Dan, listed among the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob. Numbers 26:42 calls Dan's son Shuham, and his descendants the Shuhamites. The Talmud names him as the murderer of Esau.[194]

HuzzabEdit

Huzzab is either a name or a word which appears in Nahum 2:7 (verse 8 in some Bibles). In a passage in which Nahum is predicting the fall of Nineveh, the prophet says, "Huzzab shall be led away captive" in the King James Version. However, a number of more contemporary versions since the late nineteenth century have interpreted the word as a verb, meaning "and it has been decreed."[195][196]

IEdit

IbneiahEdit

Ibneiah is the name given in Chronicles to a leader of a clan in the Tribe of Benjamin which returned to Yehud Medinata after the Babylonian captivity.[197] The same character is referred to as "Gabbai" in the parallel passage in Nehemiah.[198][199]

IbnijahEdit

Ibnijah is a figure who is mentioned indirectly in 1 Chronicles 9:8, by way of his descendant "Meshullam, son of Shephatiah, son of Reuel, son of Ibnijah." He was a Benjamite.[200]

IbsamEdit

According to Chronicles, Ibsam was the son of Tola, who in turn was the son of Issachar.[201] He is called Jibsam in the King James Version.[202]

IdbashEdit

Idbash, according to 1 Chronicles 4:3, was one of the sons of Etham, a figure who appears in the Chronicler's genealogy of the Tribe of Judah.

IgalEdit

Igal is the name of three biblical figures.

  • Igal son of Joseph of the house of Issachar, a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:7.
  • Igal son of Nathan of Zobah is mentioned only in 2 Samuel 23:36 in a list of David's Mighty Warriors.
  • Igal son of Shemaiah is listed as a descendant of Zerubbabel in 1 Chronicles 3:22. This last figure is called Igeal in the King James Version, although his name in Hebrew is the same as the other two Igals.[203]

IgdaliahEdit

Igdaliah (Hebrew yigdalyahu) is mentioned in passing as the father of a man named Hanan in Jeremiah 35:3. According to the Book of Jeremiah, the sons or descendants of Hanan son of Igdaliah had their own chamber in the temple at Jerusalem, which was the site of the famous object-lesson concerning Jeremiah and the Rechabites.[204] The Encyclopaedia Biblica claimed that the name Igdaliah was most likely a mistaken form of the name Gedaliah.[205]

IkkeshEdit

Ikkesh the Tekoite was the father of Ira, one of King David's Warriors (2 Samuel 23:26, 1 Chronicles 11:28).

IlaiEdit

See Zalmon (biblical figure).

ImlaEdit

Imla (Hebrew - ימלא, "whom God will fill up" [206]), the father of Micaiah, which latter was the prophet who ironically foretold the defeat of the allied kings of Judah and Israel against Ramoth-gilead (2 Chron 18:7-8). In the parallel passage (1 Kings 22:8-9) his name is written Imlah.

ImmerEdit

Immer was a member of the priestly family whose sons, Hanani and Zebadiah, had both taken pagan wives but repented during the communal confession instigated by the biblical priest Ezra.[207]

ImnaEdit

Imna is a biblical name which appears only in 1 Chronicles 7:35, in a genealogy of the Tribe of Asher.[208]

ImrahEdit

Imrah is a biblical name which appears only in 1 Chronicles 7:36, in a genealogy of the Tribe of Asher.[209]

ImriEdit

Imri is the name of two individuals mentioned in the Hebrew Bible.[210]

  • An Imri is mentioned in passing in the ancestry of a man named Uthai, who according to 1 Chronicles 9:4 lived in Jerusalem after the return from the Babylonian captivity.
  • A man named "Zakkur son of Imri" is recorded as taking responsibility for a section of the wall in the project of rebuilding the wall of Jerusalem, according to Nehemiah 3:2.

IphdeiahEdit

Iphdeiah (KJV Iphediah) is a name which appears very briefly as that of "Iphdeiah son of Shashak," mentioned only in a genealogy of the Tribe of Asher according to Chronicles.[211][212]

IrEdit

See Iri (biblical figure).

Ira the JairiteEdit

Ira the Jairite was David's priest or chief minister after Sheba's rebellion.[213] He is described as David's priest by the English Standard Version and New International Version, his chief ruler by the King James Version and his chief minister by the New King James Version.

IradEdit

In Genesis 4:18, Irad is the son of Enoch, the grandson of Cain and the father of Mehujael.

IramEdit

Iram is a name which appears in Genesis 36:43. In the Masoretic Text as it now stands, Iram is identified as a "tribal leader" (Hebrew alluph) of Edom. However, Thomas Kelly suggests that originally the text may have identified Iram and the other "tribal leaders" as the names not of individuals, but of clans, using the Hebrew word eleph to mean "clan."[214]

IriEdit

Iri, according to 1 Chronicles 7:7, was one of the sons of Bela, who was the son of Benjamin, eponymous founder of the Tribe of Benjamin. In verse 12, he is referred to simply as Ir.[215]

IrijahEdit

Irijah (Hebrew יראייה yiriyyah) is an official who arrests Jeremiah on suspicion of desertion.[216]

IruEdit

Iru is a name mentioned only once in the Hebrew Bible.[217] In 1 Chronicles 4:15, Iru is listed as one of the sons of Caleb. The other two were Elah and Naam.

IscahEdit

Iscah or Jesca (Jessica) was a daughter of Haran, sister of Lot and Milcah according to Genesis 11:29.

IshbahEdit

For the "Ishbah father of Eshtemoa" mentioned in 1 Chronicles, see List of minor biblical tribes § Ishbah.

Ishbi-benobEdit

Ishbi-benob is a name which appears in the Qere of the Masoretic Text at 2 Samuel 21:16.[218] Qere is the term for the version of the text traditionally read aloud in synagogues. The Ketiv, the version written but not read aloud, reads somewhat differently, in a manner that suggested to Thomas Kelly Cheyne that the opening words of the verse were not the name of the giant, but words that indicated that David and his soldiers stayed in (the city of) Nob.[218] Whatever the case with the Ketiv, the Qere as it now stands asserts that Ishbi-benob was the name of a Philistine giant, who was killed by Abishai son of Zeruiah.[218][219] Gesenius interprets his name as meaning "dweller upon the height".[220] In Brenton's Septuagint Translation, his name is given as Jesbi, the progeny of Rapha.[221]

IshhodEdit

Ishhod (King James Version Ishod) is a figure mentioned only once in the Hebrew Bible.[222] 1 Chronicles 7:18 lists Ishod as a son of Hammoleketh in a genealogy of the Tribe of Manasseh.

IshiahEdit

See Jesiah.

IshijahEdit

See Jesiah.

IshmaiahEdit

Ishmaiah (KJV Ismaiah) is the name of two biblical figures.[223]

IshmeraiEdit

Ishmerai is a biblical figure mentioned only in 1 Chronicles 8:18, where he is called "the son of Elpaal" in a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin.[224] He may be the same character as the "Shemer" or "Shemed" mentioned in 1 Chronicles 8:12.[224]

IshodEdit

See Ishhod.

IshpahEdit

Ishpah (KJV Ispah) is a name which appears in a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin.[225][226] According to 1 Chronicles 8, Ishpah was the son of Beriah, the son of Elpaal, the son of Shaharaim.[227]

IshpanEdit

Ishpan is a figure who appears only once in the Hebrew Bible, in a genealogical passage describing the people of the Tribe of Benjamin.[228] 1 Chronicles 8 calls him the son of Shashak, the son of Elpaal, the son of Shaharaim.[229]

IshuahEdit

See Ishvah.

IshuaiEdit

See Ishvah.

IshuiEdit

See Ishvi.

IshvahEdit

Ishvah (KJV Ishuah and Isuah) was one of the sons of Asher according to Genesis 46:17 and 1 Chronicles 7:30, although he is missing from the list of the sons of Asher found in Numbers 26:44.[230]

IshviEdit

Ishvi (KJV Ishui, Isui, Jesui, and Ishuai) is the name of two figures in the Hebrew Bible.[231]

  • Ishvi is the name given to a son of Asher, eponymous founder of the Tribe of Asher, in Genesis 46:17, Numbers 26:44, and 1 Chronicles 7:30. His descendants are called Ishvites in Numbers 24:44. Genesis 46 places him in the list of 70 persons who went down into Egypt with Jacob, the father of Asher and the other eleven Tribes of Israel.
  • Ishvi is the name of a son of Saul in 1 Samuel 14:49.

IsmaiahEdit

See Ishmaiah.

IspahEdit

See Ishpah.

IsshiahEdit

See Jesiah.

IsshijahEdit

See Jesiah.

IsuiEdit

See Ishvi.

IthaiEdit

See Ittai.

IthmahEdit

Ithmah is a name which appears only once in the Hebrew Bible, in 1 Chronicles 11:46, where "Ithmah the Moabite" is listed as one of David's Mighty Warriors.[232]

IthranEdit

Ithran is the name given for two figures in the Hebrew Bible.[233]

  • Ithran, son of Dishon, son of Anah, son of Zibeon, son of Seir the Horite.[234] This Ithran represents the name of a Horite clan.[233]
  • Ithran, son of Zophah, son of Helem appears in a genealogy of the Tribe of Asher.[235] The Encyclopaedia Biblica identifies the "Jether" of 1 Chronicles 7:38 as probably being identical to this Ithran.[233]

IthreamEdit

Ithream was the son of David and Eglah, David's sixth son, according to II Samuel 3:5.

IttaiEdit

Ittai (and in Chronicles, Ithai once) is the name given one or two biblical figures:

  • Ittai the Gittite appears alongside 600 soldiers as a Philistine ally of David in the time leading up to Absalom's rebellion.[236] Having only recently arrived in Jerusalem, David gives him an option to return home to Gath, but Ittai confirms his loyalty to David and helps him evacuate the city.[237] During the rebellion itself, he serves as commander of a third of David's army.[236]

IzharEdit

For the Levitical clan, see Izhar.

Izhar son of Hela is a figure who appears in a genealogy of the Tribe of Judah, in 1 Chronicles 4:7. He is called Izhar according to the variant reading known as Qere. According to the Ketiv his name is Zohar. The King James Version calls him Jezoar.

IzrahiahEdit

Izrahiah (Jezrahiah) is the name of two biblical figures.

  • Izrahiah son of Uzzi, son of Tola, son of Issachar appears in a genealogy of the Tribe of Issachar.[239]
  • Izrahiah (KJV Jezrahiah) is, according to Nehemiah 12:42, a leader of singers in a procession headed by Nehemiah.

IzriEdit

Izri (Zeri) appears in a list of persons responsible for liturgical music in the time of David, according to 1 Chronicles 25:11. In 1 Chronicles 25:3, he is called Zeri.[240]

IzziahEdit

Izziah (KJV Jeziah), a descendant of Parosh, is listed as one of the men who married foreign wives in the time of Nehemiah.[241]

JEdit

JaanaiEdit

See Janai (biblical figure).

JaareshiahEdit

Jaareshiah (KJV Jaresiah) is a name which appears only 1 Chronicles 8:27, where Jaaresiah is identified as one of the sons of Jeroham.[242] The text does not identify any information about Jeroham's parentage, but the passage is part of a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin.[242]

JaasaiEdit

See Jaasu.

JaasauEdit

See Jaasu.

JaasielEdit

Jaasiel (Jasiel) is the name of one of David's Mighty Warriors.[243] He is referred to in Hebrew as hammitsovayah, which has been variously translated as "the Mezobaite," "the Mesobaite," or "from Zobah."[244][245] A "Jaasiel son of Abner" is listed as a Benjamite leader in 1 Chronicles 27:21, who may be the same person.[244]

JaasuEdit

Jaasu (also called Jaasau, Jaasai) is a name which appears in a list of men alleged to have married foreign women in the time of Nehemiah.[246]

JaaziahEdit

Jaaziah is listed as one of the sons of Merari in a passage discussing the various divisions of Levites.[247]

JaazielEdit

Jaaziel is the name of a Levite musician who appears in 1 Chronicles 15:18. He reappears as "Aziel" in 15:20.[248]

JacanEdit

Jacan (or Jachan) is a name which appears once in the Hebrew Bible, in a list of Gadites in Chronicles.[249][250]

JachinEdit

Jachin was a son of Simeon according to Genesis 46:10, Exodus 6:15, and Numbers 26:12, one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

JahathEdit

Jahath is the name of several individuals in the Hebrew Bible.[251]

  • Jahath son of Reaiah, son of Shobal, son of Judah (son of Jacob) is mentioned in 1 Chronicles 4:2, in a genealogical passage describing the Tribe of Judah.
  • Jahath is a name applied to various Levites in 1 Chronicles 6:20 (verse 5 in some Bibles), 6:43 (verse 28 in some Bibles), 23:10, 24:22; and 2 Chronicles 34:12.[251]

JahaziahEdit

See Jahzeiah.

JahleelEdit

Jahleel was a son of Zebulun according to Genesis 46:14 and Numbers 26:26. He was one of the 70 persons to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

JahmaiEdit

For the Jahmai of 1 Chronicles 7:2, see List of minor biblical tribes § Jahmai.

JahzeelEdit

Jahzeel was a son of Naphtali according to Genesis 46:24 and Numbers 26:48. He was one of the 70 persons to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

JahzeiahEdit

Jahzeiah (KJV Jahaziah) son of Tikvah is one of the figures listed in the Book of Ezra as opposing Ezra's prohibition on marriages with foreign women.[252][253]

JahzerahEdit

Jahzerah is a name which appears only in 1 Chronicles 9:12.[254] See Ahzai.

JakehEdit

Jakeh is a name that appears only in Proverbs 30:1, where part of the Book of Proverbs is ascribed to a man called "Agur son of Jakeh". Franz Delitzsch proposed that the name "Jakeh" means "scrupulously pious."[255]

JanaiEdit

Janai (Jaanai) is a name that appears only 1 Chronicles 5:12, where Janai is listed as a descendant of Gad. According to the Encyclopaedia Biblica, the name represents the name of a clan within the Tribe of Gad.[256]

JaribEdit

Jarib is the name of three individuals in the Hebrew Bible, and appears once in the King James Version of 1 Maccabees 14:29.

  • In 1 Chronicles 4:24, one of the sons of Simeon (son of Jacob) is called Jarib. In other passages, he is called Jachin.[257]
  • A Jarib appears in a list of leaders recruited by Ezra to find Levites for the resettlement of Jerusalem.[258]
  • A priest by the name of Jarib is mentioned in a list of men who married foreign women in Ezra 10:18.
  • In 1 Maccabees 14:29, in the King James Version a priest named Simon is described as being "of the posterity of Jarib." The New English Translation of the Septuagint transliterates the name as Ioarib, while the New American Bible reads Joarib.

JakimEdit

This section is about individuals named Jakim. For the priestly division named Jakim, see the priestly division of Jakim.

Jakim is the name of one individual mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, as well as one individual mentioned in some manuscripts of the New Testament's Gospel of Matthew. In a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin, in 1 Chronicles 24:12, a Jakim appears, as the son of Shimei (who is referred to as Shema in verse 13).[259] In some Greek manuscripts of Matthew, a Jakim appears between Josiah and Jechoniah in a genealogy of Jesus.[260][259]

JalonEdit

Jalon was one of four sons of Ezrah, and the uncle of Miriam, Shammai and Ishbah (father of Eshtemoa). (1 Chr. 4:17)

JaminEdit

The name Jamin means right hand. There are three different Jamins in the Bible:

  1. a son of Simeon according to Genesis 46:10, Exodus 6:15, and Numbers 26:12. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.
  2. Man of Judah, see 1 Chronicles 2:27
  3. Post exile Levite who interpreted the law, see Nehemiah 8:7,8

JamlechEdit

Jamlech is a figure who appears once in the Hebrew Bible, in list of kin group leaders in the Tribe of Simeon, who according to the Bible lived in the time of Hezekiah and exterminated the Meunim.[261][262]

JaphiaEdit

Japhia was the king of Lachish, one of the five kings of the Amorites whose battle against the settling Israelites led by Joshua is reported in Joshua 10:1-15. Along with the other four kings, he was subsequently found in a cave at Makkedah, where he was killed and buried by Joshua and his forces (Joshua 10:26-27).

JarebEdit

Jareb is a name which appears in Hosea 5:13 and 10:16 in some translations of the Bible.[263] In both passages, the Hebrew text refers to a mlk yrb (KJV "King Jareb") in a way that implies that mlk yrb is the king of Assyria.[264] However, no Assyrian king by the name of "Jareb" is known to history, which has led to a variety of conjectures about what the phrase refers to.[265] According to W. F. Albright, the "definitive solution" to the problem is that the text should read mlk rb or mlky rb, meaning "the great king", a Hebrew translation of the common Assyrian royal title sharru rabu.[264] The proposed emendation to "great king" has been accepted in a number of biblical translations.[266]

JaresiahEdit

See Jaareshiah.

JarhaEdit

Jarha was an Egyptian slave of Sheshan who was married to Sheshan's daughter according to 1 Chronicles 2:34-35.

JarahEdit

See Jehoaddah.

JasielEdit

See Jaasiel.

JathnielEdit

Jathniel is a minor biblical figure who appears only in 1 Chronicles 26:2, in a list of Korahite porters.[267]

JazizEdit

Jaziz the Hagrite, according to 1 Chronicles 27:31, was in charge of king David's flocks of sheep and goats.

JeatheraiEdit

See Ethni.

JecamiahEdit

See Jekamiah.

JecholiahEdit

Jecholiah (Hebrew: יכליהו, yekhalyahu) of Jerusalem was the wife of the King of Judah, Amaziah, and the mother of King Azariah.[268] Depending on translation used, her name may also be spelled Jechiliah, Jecoliah, or Jekoliah.

JediaelEdit

There are three individuals in the Hebrew Bible named Jediael.[269]

  • Jediael son of Shimri is listed as one of David's warriors in 1 Chronicles 11:45.
  • Jediael, a man from the Tribe of Manasseh, appears in a list of warriors said to have deserted David when he went to Ziklag.[270]
  • Jediael son of Meshelemiah appears in a list of Korahite porters in the time of David.[271]

JeezerEdit

Jeezer was a son of Gilead of the Tribe of Manasseh according to Numbers 26:30.

JehallelelEdit

Jehallelel (KJV Jehaleleel or Jehalelel) is the name of two individuals in the Hebrew Bible.[272]

  • A Jehallelel appears in 1 Chronicles 4:16, in a genealogy of the Tribe of Judah.
  • Another Jehallelel appears in a list of Levites in 2 Chronicles 29:12.

JehdeiahEdit

Jehdeiah is the name of two individuals in the Hebrew Bible.[273]

  • A Levite mentioned in 1 Chronicles 24:20.
  • Jehdeiah the Meronothite, who according to 1 Chronicles 27:30 was in charge of king David's donkeys.

JehiahEdit

Jehiah is a figure who is only mentioned once in the Bible, in 1 Chronicles 15:24, which describes him as a gatekeeper for the Ark of the Covenant in the time of David.[274]

JehielEdit

This entry contains close paraphrases and borrowing of wording found in entries entitled "Jehiel" the Encyclopaedia Biblica, a work that is now in the public domain.

Jehiel is the name of fourteen figures in the Hebrew Bible.[275]

For eleven of these the English spelling "Jehiel" reflects the Hebrew name יחיאל:[275]

  • A Levite musician in the time of David (1 Chronicles 15:18, 20; 16:5).
  • The leader of a family of Gershonite Levities in the time of David (1 Chronicles 23:8; 29:8).
  • Jehiel the son of Hachmoni, who was with David's sons (1 Chronicles 27:32).
  • Jehiel the son of king Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 21:2).
  • A Hemanite Levite in the time of Hezekiah, called Jehuel in the Revised Version (2 Chronicles 29:14).
  • A Levitical or priestly oversees of the temple in the time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:13).
  • A person referred to as "ruler of the house of God" in the time of Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:8).
  • The father of Obadiah in a post-exilic list of kin groups (Ezra 8:9).
  • The father of Shechaniah (Ezra 10:2).
  • Jehiel the son of Harim, a priest (Ezra 10:21).
  • Jehiel the son of Elam, a layman (Ezra 10:26).

For the other three, the name Jehiel (or Jeiel) reflects the Hebrew spelling יעיאל.

  • One of the sons of Elam (Ezra 10:2).
  • A Gibeonite described as the "father of Gibeon" in 1 Chronicles 9:35.
  • A son of Hothan the Aroerite, who along with his brother Shama was listed as one of David's Mighty Warriors in 1 Chronicles 11:44.

JehizkiahEdit

Jehizkiah son of Shallum is mentioned in a list of Ephraimite leaders who, according to 2 Chronicles 28, intervened along with the prophet Oded to prevent the enslavement of 200,000 people from the Kingdom of Judah during the time of the king Ahaz.[276]

JehoaddahEdit

Joehoaddah (or Jehoadah, Jarah) was one of the descendants of King Saul, according to 1 Chronicles 8:33-36. In 1 Chronicles 9:42, which contains a copy of the same genealogy of Saul, his name is given as "Jarah."[277]

JehoaddanEdit

Jehoaddan (Hebrew: יהועדן, Yehōaddān; "YHWH delights") was a native of Jerusalem, the wife of King Joash of Judah, and mother of his successor, King Amaziah. II Kings 14:2

JehoiadaEdit

Jehoiada (Hebrew: יהוידע,Yehoyada "The LORD Knows"[278]) was the name of at least three people in the Hebrew Bible:

  • Jehoiada, a priest during the reigns of Ahaziah, Athaliah, and Joash (q.v.)
  • Jehoiada, father of Benaiah (cf. Benaiah)
  • Jehoiada, a priest in the time of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 29:26)

JehoshaphatEdit

Jehoshaphat (Hebrew: יהושפט, yehoshaphat, God Judges) son of Paruah, was one of King Solomon's twelve regional administrators, his jurisdiction was Issachar. (I Kings 4:17)

Jehosphaphat, son of Ahilud, was King Solomon's recorder. (I Kings 4:3)

JehozabadEdit

Jehozabad (Hebrew: יהוזבד, yehozabad) is the name of three figures in the Hebrew Bible.[279]

  • Jehozabad son of Shomer was one of the assassinators of King Joash of Judah. II Kings 12:21. "This person is called Zabad, in 2 Chron. xxiv.26..." [280]
  • Jehozabad, according 2 Chronicles 17:18, was a leader of 180,000 Benjamite warriors in the time of king Jehoshaphat.
  • Jehozabad is listed as one of the sons of Obed-edom according to 1 Chronicles 26:4.

JehubbahEdit

Jehubbah (or Hubbah) is the name of an individual who appears in a genealogy of the Tribe of Asher. His name depends on which variant reading (see Qere and Ketiv) of the Masoretic Text one follows: the Ketiv reads yhbh ("Jehubbah") the Qere reads whbh ("and Hubbah").[281]

JehudiEdit

Jehudi (Hebrew יהודי "Judahite") "the son of Nethaniah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Cushi" (Jeremiah 36:14) was one of the delegates the princes sent to fetch Baruch, Jeremiah's scribe, to read his scroll.

JehudijahEdit

Jehudijah (Hebrew hayyehudiyyah) is, in the King James Version, the name of a wife of Mered, and the mother of several of his children.[282] The Jewish Publication Society Bible of 1917 calls her "Hajehudijah." However, the Revised Version simply treats the word as a noun: "the Jewess."[282] The meaning of the passage is difficult due to several scribal errors.[282]

JehushEdit

See Jeush.

JeielEdit

Jeiel is the name of ten individuals in the Hebrew Bible.[283]

  • Jeiel, according to 1 Chronicles 5:7, was a leader in the Tribe of Reuben.
  • Jeiel, referred to as the "father of Gibeon", was an ancestor of King Saul.[284] The King James Version calls him "Jehiel."[283] This figure's name is affected by variant readings preserved through the Qere and Ketiv system in the Masoretic Text: the Ketiv calls him "Jeuel," while the Qere calls him "Jeiel."[283]
  • Jeiel son of Hotham the Aroerite is listed as one of David's warriors in 1 Chronicles 11:44. The King James Version calls him "Jehiel." This figure's name is affected by variant readings preserved through the Qere and Ketiv system in the Masoretic Text: the Ketiv calls him "Jeuel," while the Qere calls him "Jeiel."[283]
  • A Jeiel is mentioned in passing in a list of gatekeepers for the Ark of the Covenant in 1 Chronicles 15:18.
  • A Jeiel is listed as one of the ancestors of a Levite named Jahaziel in 2 Chronicles 20:14.
  • A Jeiel was one of the scribes of Uzziah according to 2 Chronicles 26:11. This figure's name is affected by variant readings preserved through the Qere and Ketiv system in the Masoretic Text: the Ketiv calls him "Jeuel," while the Qere calls him "Jeiel."[283]
  • A Jeiel is recorded as a Levite in the time of Hezekiah. This figure's name is affected by variant readings preserved through the Qere and Ketiv system in the Masoretic Text: the Ketiv calls him "Jeuel," while the Qere calls him "Jeiel."[283] The Revised Version calls him Jeuel, following the Ketiv.[283]
  • A Jeiel is recorded as a leader in the Tribe of Levi in time of Uzziah according to 2 Chronicles 35:9.
  • In a list of returnees to Yehud Medinata after the end of the Babylonian captivity, a Jeiel is recorded as being the head of a group of relatives according to Ezra 8:13. The Revised Version calls him Jeuel.
  • A Jeiel, of the "descendants of Nebo," is listed as one of the people opposing marriage to foreign women in the time of Nehemiah.[285]

JekameamEdit

Jekameam son of Hebron is mentioned in passing in two genealogical passages.[286]

JekamiahEdit

Jekamiah (KJV spelling Jecamiah) is the name of two individuals in the Hebrew Bible.[287]

  • Jekamiah son of Shallum, son of Sismai, son of Eleasah, son of Helez, son of Azariah, son of Jehu, son of Obed, son of Ephlal, son of Zabad, son of Nathan, son of Attai, son of Jarha, the son-in-law and slave of Sheshan, son of Ishi, son of Appaim, son of Nadab, son of Shammai, son of Onam, son of Jerahmeel, the alleged ancestor of the Jerahmeelites.[288]
  • Jekamiah, a son of Jeconiah, the last king of Judah, who was taken captive by the Babylonians.[289]

JekoliahEdit

See Jecholiah.

JekuthielEdit

Jekuthiel, father of Zanoah, appears in 1 Chronicles 4:18, in a genealogical passage concerning the Tribe of Judah.[290]

JemimaEdit

Jemima, meaning "Dove" was a daughter of Job according to Job 42:14.

JemuelEdit

Jemuel was a son of Simeon according to Genesis 46:10, Exodus 6:15, and Numbers 26:12. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

JephunnehEdit

Jephunneh (יְפֻנֶּה) is a biblical name which means "for whom a way is prepared", and was the name of two biblical figures:

  • A descendant of Judah, and father of Kenaz and Caleb the spy or scout, who appears to have belonged to an Edomitish tribe called Kenezites, from Kenaz their founder. See (Numbers 13:6 etc.; Num. 32:12 etc.; Josh 14:14 etc.; 1 Chr 4:15).
  • A descendant of Asher, eldest of the three sons of Jether (1 Chronicles 7:38).

JerahEdit

Jerah was a son of Joktan according to Genesis 10:26, 1 Chronicles 1:20.

JeremaiEdit

Jeremai, one of the "descendants of Hashum," is a figure who appears only in Ezra 10:33, where he is listed among the men who married foreign women.[291]

JeriahEdit

See Jerijah.

JeriothEdit

Jerioth was a wife of Caleb according to 1 Chronicles 2:18.

JerielEdit

Jeriel, son of Tola, son of Issachar, is found in a genealogy of the Tribe of Issachar in 1 Chronicles 7:2.

JerijahEdit

Jerijah (sometimes Jeriah) is listed is one of the sons of Hebron in genealogical passages in 1 Chronicles 23:19, 24:23, 26:31.[292]

JerushaEdit

Jerusha (or Jerushah) the daughter of Zadok was, according to the 2 Kings 15:33 and 2 Chronicles 27:1, the mother of king Jotham of Judah.

JesbiEdit

See Ishbi-benob

JeshaiahEdit

Jeshaiah may refer to multiple figures in the Bible:

  1. A descendant of David, the father of Rephaiah, and the son of Hananiah in 1 Chronicles 3:21.
  2. One of eight sons of Jeduthun in 1 Chronicles 25:3.
  3. For the man in 1 Chronicles 24 and 26 who is sometimes called Jeshaiah, see Jesiah.

JesherEdit

Jesher the son of Caleb is mentioned only in 1 Chronicles 2:18.

JeshishaiEdit

Jeshishai is a figure mentioned only once, in passing, in a genealogy of Gad.[293][294]

JeshohaiahEdit

Jeshohaiah appears in a list of names of Simeonites. According to Chronicles these Simeonites took pasture-land from descendants of Ham and the Meunim during the time of king Hezekiah.[295] According to Thomas Kelly Cheyne, the name is a corruption of Maaseiah.[296]

JesimielEdit

Jesimiel appears in a list of names of Simeonites. According to Chronicles these Simeonites took pasture-land from descendants of Ham and the Meunim during the time of king Hezekiah.[295] According to Thomas Kelly Cheyne, the name is a corruption of Maaseel.[296]

JesuiEdit

See Ishvi.

JeuelEdit

Jeuel son of Zerah appears in a list of people living in Jerusalem after the end of the Babylonian exile. For four other individuals who are sometimes called "Jeuel" and sometimes "Jeiel," see Jeiel.

JeushEdit

Jeush is the name of four or five individuals mentioned in the Hebrew Bible.[297]

  • Jeush son of Esau.[298] A variant manuscript reading, known as Ketiv, calls him Jeish.[297]
  • Jeush son of Bilhan, son of Jediael, the son of Benjamin, mentioned in a genealogy which describes the people of the Tribe of Benjamin.[86]
  • Jeush son of Eshek, who is mentioned in a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin.[120] According to the Encyclopaedia Biblica, this is likely a reference to the same person called Jeush son of Bilhan. The King James Version calls him Jehush.
  • Jeush son of Shimei represented a division of Levites according to 1 Chronicles 23:10-11.
  • Jeush son of king Rehoboam.[299]

JezebelEdit

Jezebel was a false prophetess whom Jesus warned the church in Thyatira not to follow. She encouraged her followers to be promiscuous and to eat food sacrificed to idols. Jesus gave her a chance to repent of her sins, but she did not; thus, Jesus promised to punish her (see Revelation 2:20-23).

JezerEdit

Jezer was a son of Naphtali according to Genesis 46:24 and Numbers 26:49. He was one of the 70 persons to migrate to Egypt with Jacob. According to Numbers he was the progenitor of the Jezerites.

JeziahEdit

See Izziah.

JezoarEdit

See Izhar.

JezrahiahEdit

See Izrahiah.

JezreelEdit

One of the sons of the father of Etam according to 1 Chronicles 4:3

JibsamEdit

See Ibsam.

JidlaphEdit

Jidlaph was the son of Nahor and Milcah (Genesis 22:22).

JimnahEdit

Jimnah or Jimna was a son of Asher according to Genesis 46:17 and Numbers 26:44. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

JishuiEdit

Jishui was the second son of King Saul, mentioned in Saul's genealogy in 1 Samuel 14:49. He is called Abinadab in 1 Chronicles 8:33 and 9:39.

JoahazEdit

For either of the biblical kings names Jehoahaz or Joahaz, see Jehoahaz of Israel or Jehoahaz of Judah.

Joahaz, according 2 Chronicles 34:8, was the name of the father of Josiah's scribe Joah.

JoashEdit

This entry about the four minor biblical characters named Joash. For the kings named Joash or Jehoash, see Jehoash of Israel and Jehoash of Judah.

Joash, an abbreviated name of Jehoash, is the name of several figures in the Hebrew Bible.

  • Joash, an Abiezrite of the Tribe of Manasseh, was the father of Gideon according to Judges 6 - 8.[300] His family was poor and lived in Ophrah. After Gideon tore down the altar of Baal and cut down the grove, the men of Ophrah sought to kill Gideon. Joash stood against them, saying, "He that will plead for [Baal], let him be put to death whilst it is yet morning: if he be a god, let him plead for himself, because one hath cast down his altar."
  • A Joash is described as "the kings son" in the time of Ahab. According to Stanley Arthur Cook, it is uncertain whether he was the son of king Ahab, or whether "king's son" was a title used high officers.[301]
  • Joash is described as one of the sons of Shelah son of Judah (son of Jacob) in a genealogy of the Tribe of Judah.[302]
  • A Joash is named as one of the Benjamite warriors to came to the aid of David when he went to Ziklag.[303]

JobEdit

Job or Jashub was a son of Issachar according to Genesis 46:13, Numbers 26:24 and 1 Chronicles 7:1. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

JobabEdit

Jobab is the name of at least five men in the Hebrew Bible.

JoedEdit

Joed is the name of a man mentioned in passing as being an ancestor of Sallu, a Benjamite in the time of Nehemiah.[304]

JoelEdit

Joel is the name of several men in the Hebrew Bible:

JoelahEdit

Joelah, in 1 Chronicles 12:7, is listed as one of the Benjamite warriors who went to David at Ziklag.

JoezerEdit

Joezer, according to 1 Chronicles 12:6, is the name of one of the Benjamite warriors who came to the aid of David when he went to Ziklag in Philistine territory due to the hostility of king Saul.

JogliEdit

Jogli was the father of Bukki, a prince of the Tribe of Dan. (Num. 34:22)

Johanan son of KareahEdit

Johanan (Hebrew: יוחנן "God is merciful") son of Kareah was among the officers who survived the destruction of Jerusalem and exile of Judeans by the king of Babylon; he warned Gedaliah, the governor, of a plot to kill him, but was ignored. Jeremiah 40 7ff.

JoiaribEdit

Joiarib ("God will contend") is the name of two biblical persons:

  • Ancestor of Maaseiah the son of Barukh, who was one of those to resettle Jerusalem after the return from Babylonia. (Neh. 11:5)
  • The head of a family of priests at the time of the return from Babylonia. (Neh. 12:6) He was one of the "men of understanding" sent by Ezra to Iddo in order to procure men to minister in the Temple. (Ezr. 8:16) His son was Jedaiah, one of the priests to resettle Jerusalem. (Neh. 11:10) The head of the family at the time of Joiakim was Mattenai. (Neh. 12:19)

JokimEdit

Jokim is listed as one of the descendants of Shelah, son of Judah (son of Jacob) in 1 Chronicles 4:22.

Jonathan son of AbiatharEdit

Jonathan was a son of Abiathar the priest (2 Samuel 15:27), and served as a messenger during Absalom's rebellion. (2 Samuel 15:36, 17:17).

Jonathan son of KareahEdit

Jonathan (Hebrew: יונתן "God gave") son of Kareah was among the officers who survived the destruction of Jerusalem and exile of Judeans by the king of Babylon; he was brother to Johanan q.v. - Jeremiah 40:8

JosephEdit

Joseph of the house of Issachar was the father of Igal, a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:7.

JoshahEdit

Joshah son of Amaziah is mentioned only once in the Bible, where is listed among Benjamite leaders in 1 Chronicles 4:34.[307] He is one of several clan leaders who, according to Chronicles, were involved in exterminating the descendants of Ham and the Meunim, and taking their pasture-lands.

JoshaviahEdit

Joshaviah son of Elnaam is a biblical figure who appears only in 1 Chronicles 11:46, in a listing of David's Mighty Warriors.[308]

JoshbekashahEdit

Joshbekashah appears as one of the sons of Heman in a passage which describes the musicians of the Jerusalem Temple in the time of David.[309]

JoshibiahEdit

Joshibiah (King James Version spelling Josibiah) is given in 1 Chronicles 4:35 as the father of Jehu, one of the Benjamite clan leaders in the time of Hezekiah who exterminated the descendants of Ham and the Meunim and took their farmland.[310]

Joshua the BethshemiteEdit

Joshua the Bethshemite was the owner of the field in which the Ark of the Covenant came to rest when the Philistines sent it away on a driverless ox-drawn cart. (I Samuel 6:14)

Joshua the governor of the cityEdit

Joshua (Hebrew: יהושע yehoshua "God saves") was a city governor in the time of King Josiah of Judah. II Kings 23:8

JosibiahEdit

See Joshibiah.

JosiphiahEdit

Josiphiah is a name which appears in a list of returnees from the Babylonian captivity, where "Shelomith son of Josiphiah" is listed as the leader of the 160 men of the "descendants of Bani" who returned to Yehud Medinata in the time of Nehemiah.[311]

JozabadEdit

Jozabad is the name of several individuals mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. For three other individuals with a similar name, see Jehozabad.

  • Jozabad of Gederah is listed as one of David's warriors in 1 Chronicles 12:4.
  • Two men named Jozabad from the Tribe of Manasseh are listed as warriors of David in 1 Chronicles 12:20.
  • Jozabad, according to 2 Chronicle 31:13, was an overseer in the Temple at Jerusalem in the time of Hezekiah.
  • A Jozabad is described as a Levite leader in 2 Chronicles 35:9. This may be the same individual overseeing the Temple in the time of Hezekiah.[312]
  • Jozabad son of Joshua is listed as a Levite in the time of Ezra in the time of Ezra 8:33.
  • A Levite Jozabad is listed in Ezra 10:22 as having taken a foreign wife.
  • A Levite Jozabad is listed as having a foreign wife in Ezra 10:23. This man may be the same as Joshua son of Joshua mentioned above, and/or the same as the two individuals below.[312]
  • A Jozabad is listed in Nehemiah 8:7 as one of those who helped explain the law to the people of Yehud Medinata.
  • A Jozabad is listed as one of the inhabitants of Jerusalem in Nehemiah 11:16.

JozacharEdit

Jozachar (Hebrew: יוֹזָכָר, yozakhar, "God Remembered") or Jozacar, son of Shimeath, was one of the assassins of king Joash of Judah. In 2 Kings 12:21 the Hebrew is יוזבד, yozabad.

Judas of Straight Street in DamascusEdit

When he went blind at his conversion experience, Paul the Apostle stayed at the home of a man named Judas who lived on Straight Street in Damascus. Then, Jesus told Ananias to go to Judas' house and restore Paul's sight (see Acts 9:1-19).

JuliaEdit

Julia was a Christian woman at Rome to whom Paul sent his salutations in Romans 16:15, supposed to be the wife of Philologus.[313]

Jushab-hesedEdit

Jushab-hesed is a name which appears in the Hebrew Bible only in 1 Chronicles 3:20, where he is said to be one of the sons of Zerubbabel.[314]

KEdit

KallaiEdit

Kallai is named as ancestral head of the priestly house of Sallai in the time of Jehoiakim, according to Nehemiah 12:20.

KarshenaEdit

See Carshena.

KelalEdit

Kelal or Chelal is a person listed in Ezra as among those who married foreign women.[32]

KelitaEdit

Kelita ("maiming"[315]) was a Levite who assisted Ezra in expounding the law to the people. (Nehemiah 8:7,10:10) He was also known as Kelaiah. (Ezra 10:23)

KemuelEdit

Kemuel Prince of the tribe of Ephraim; one of those appointed by Moses to superintend the division of Canaan amongst the tribe (Num. 34:24).

Keren-happuchEdit

Keren-happuch, sometimes spelled Kerenhappuch,[316] is the name of Job's third daughter (Job 42:14) who was born after prosperity had returned to him.[317]

KeziahEdit

Keziah ("Cassia") is the name of Job's second daughter.[318]

KimhamEdit

See Chimham

KolaiahEdit

Kolaiah ("voice of Jehovah") is the father of the false prophet Ahab (Jeremiah 29:21). It is also the name of an ancestor of Sallu that settled in Jerusalem after returning from the Babylonian exile (Nehemiah 11:7).[319]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Strong's Hebrew and Greek Dictionary
  2. ^ "ABDEEL". JewishEncyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2012-04-06. 
  3. ^ Fretz, Mark J. (1992). "Abdeel (Person)". In Freedman, David Noel. The Anchor Bible Dictionary. 1. New York: Doubleday. p. 8. ISBN 9780300140811. 
  4. ^ International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, "Abdi."
  5. ^ This verse, in the King James Version and some other Bibles, is verse 44 of chapter 6.
  6. ^ a b c Jewish Publication Society Bible of 1917
  7. ^ Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, entry for "Abdi."
  8. ^ New English Translation of the Septuagint
  9. ^ Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica,' entry for "Abdi."
  10. ^ Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, second entry titled "Abdon."
  11. ^ This section on Abdon incorporates information from the 1897 Easton's Bible Dictionary.
  12. ^ Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, first entry for "Abdon."
  13. ^ a b Genesis 25:4, 1 Chronicles 1:33
  14. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Abida". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  15. ^ a b Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, entry for "Abinadab"
  16. ^ 1 Samuel 7:1
  17. ^ Ellicott's Commentary for Modern Readers on 1 Samuel 7, accessed 26 April 2017
  18. ^ 1 Samuel 7:1,2; 1 Chronicles 13:7; 2 Samuel 6:3
  19. ^ 1 Samuel 16:8
  20. ^ 1 Samuel 17:13
  21. ^ 1 Samuel 31:2; 1 Chronicles 10:2
  22. ^ 1 Kings 4:7-11
  23. ^ Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, entry for "Abimael."
  24. ^ See the entry for "Abitub" in Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica.
  25. ^ International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915), "Adah."
  26. ^ Easton's Bible Dictionary entry on Adah
  27. ^ Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, entry on "Adah"
  28. ^ a b Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, entry for "Adaliah." [1]
  29. ^ a b Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, entry for "Admatha.
  30. ^ New Living Translation, English Standard Version, New American Standard Bible, New English Translation.
  31. ^ Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, entry for "Adna"
  32. ^ a b Ezra 10:30
  33. ^ Nehemiah 12:15
  34. ^ a b c d e Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, entries for "Adnah." [2]
  35. ^ Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, entry for "Aduel."
  36. ^ Cheyne and Black (1899), Encyclopaedia Biblica, entry for "Aedias." [3]
  37. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Shutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Agee". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  38. ^ The New Jerome Biblical Commentary, 1991, pages 287288
  39. ^ 1 Chronicles 7:19.
  40. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ahian". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  41. ^ Chad Brand; Archie England; Charles W. Draper (1 October 2003). Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary. B&H Publishing Group. p. 101. ISBN 978-1-4336-6978-1. 
  42. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Ahishahar". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  43. ^ a b c Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Ahlai". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  44. ^ 1 Chronicles 4:6
  45. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ahuzam". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  46. ^ Referred to as "Ahuzzah" in the New English Translation, but as "Ahuzzath" in most other sources.
  47. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ahuzzath". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  48. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ahasai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  49. ^ Magonet, Jonathan (1992) Bible Lives (London, SCM), 116
  50. ^ I Kings 22:26
  51. ^ On the etymology, see T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Anaiah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  52. ^ Nehemiah 8:4
  53. ^ Nehemiah 10:22
  54. ^ "Easton's Bible Dictionary". 
  55. ^ 1 Chronicles 3:24
  56. ^ a b Isaac Kalimi (January 2005). An Ancient Israelite Historian: Studies in the Chronicler, His Time, Place and Writing. Uitgeverij Van Gorcum. pp. 61–64. ISBN 978-90-232-4071-6. 
  57. ^ 1 Chronicles 8:24
  58. ^ a b c T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Antothijah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  59. ^ 1 Samuel 9
  60. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Appaim". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  61. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Arah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  62. ^ 1 Chronicles 7:39
  63. ^ Ezra 2:5 mentions 775 returnees of the sons of Arah, Nehemiah 7:10 mentions 652.
  64. ^ Nehemiah 6:18
  65. ^ 1 Chronicles 4:16
  66. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Asareel". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  67. ^ J. D. Douglas; Merrill C. Tenney (3 May 2011). "Jehallelel". Zondervan Illustrated Bible Dictionary. Harper Collins. p. 700. ISBN 978-0-310-49235-1. 
  68. ^ 46:21
  69. ^ Nehemiah 11:4
  70. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Athaiah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  71. ^ Ezra 10:28
  72. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Athlai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  73. ^ 1 Esdras 9:29
  74. ^ Holman Bible Dictionary (1991)
  75. ^ Holman Bible Dictionary (1991)
  76. ^ Nehemiah 10:15
  77. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Azgad". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  78. ^ International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, "Basemath"
  79. ^ http://www.abarim-publications.com/Meaning/Ben-ammi.html#.VG0I_PnF-uk
  80. ^ Gen. 46:17, Num. 26:44-5, 1 Chr. 7:30
  81. ^ 1 Chronicles 7:23, New Revised Standard Version
  82. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Carshena". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  83. ^ 1 Chronicles 2:6
  84. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Chelluh". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  85. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Chelub". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  86. ^ a b 1 Chronicles 7:10
  87. ^ 1 Kings 22:11, 24; 2 Chronicles 18:10
  88. ^ 1 Chronicles 15:22, 27; 26:29.
  89. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Chenaniah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  90. ^ Masoretic Text at 2 Samuel 19:40
  91. ^ 2 Samuel 19:40 - New International Version
  92. ^ Jeremiah 41:17
  93. ^ I Kings 4:31
  94. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Darda". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  95. ^ http://dictionary.reference.com/
  96. ^ Lev. 24:15-16
  97. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Dodavah". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 1, A-D. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  98. ^ a b The Interpreter's Bible, 1951, volume V, page 1017
  99. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Elasah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  100. ^ Mark J. Boda (2010). 1-2 Chronicles. Tyndale House Publishers. p. 81. ISBN 978-0-8423-3431-0. 
  101. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Eliada". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  102. ^ 1 Chronicles 17:17
  103. ^ a b c d e T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Eliphelet". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  104. ^ Ancient Hebrew, in general, did not include vowels. For a more thorough description, see Hebrew alphabet.
  105. ^ The spellings Elpalet, Elpelet, Eliphal, Eliphalet, and Eliphalat appear in English Bibles. In manuscripts of the Greek Septuagint, the spellings Aleiphaleth, Aleiphat, Eleiphaath, Eleiphala, Eleiphalat, Eleiphalet, Eleiphaleth, Eleiphaneth, Eleiphal, Eliaphalet, Eliphaad, Eliphaal, Eliphaath, Eliphael, Eliphala, Eliphalad, Eliphalat, Eliphalatos, Eliphaleis, Eliphalet, Eliphath, Elphadat, Elphalat, Elphat, Emphalet, and Ophelli occur. For the exact manuscripts and passages where these names appear, see the Encyclopaedia Biblica article for "Eliphelet."
  106. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Elienai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  107. ^ Holman Bible Dictionary.
  108. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Elioenai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  109. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Elizur". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  110. ^ Luke 3:28
  111. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Elmodam". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  112. ^ See for example Magonet, Jonathan (1992) Bible Lives (London, SCM), 107
  113. ^ Donna Laird (3 October 2016). Negotiating Power in Ezra–Nehemiah. SBL Press. p. 295. ISBN 978-0-88414-163-1. 
  114. ^ Verses 11 and 12.
  115. ^ Verse 5 in some Bibles.
  116. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Eluzai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  117. ^ He is mentioned in Numbers 1:15, 2:29, 7:78, 8:3, and 10:27
  118. ^ 1 Chronicles 2:37
  119. ^ Stanley Arthur Cook (1901) [1899]. "Ephlal". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  120. ^ a b 1 Chronicles 8:39
  121. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Eshek". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  122. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ethnan". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  123. ^ 1 Chr. 24:17
  124. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Gatam". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  125. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Gazez". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  126. ^ Jeremiah 36:25
  127. ^ Hitchcock's Bible Dictionary of Names
  128. ^ a b c T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ginath". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  129. ^ a b Launderville, Dale F. (1992). "Gideoni (Person)". In Freedman, David Noel. The Anchor Bible Dictionary. 2. New York: Doubleday. p. 1015. ISBN 9780300140811. 
  130. ^ Nehemiah 12:36
  131. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Gilalai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  132. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Gispa". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  133. ^ T. K. Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Haahashtari". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  134. ^ This information comes from Ezra 2:59-62
  135. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Habaiah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  136. ^ Ezra 2:59-62
  137. ^ Ezra 2:63
  138. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Habaziniah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  139. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Hachmoni". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  140. ^ Easton's Bible Dictionary
  141. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hadlai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  142. ^ a b c T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hagab". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  143. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hagabah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  144. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hakkatan". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  145. ^ a b Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Halohesh". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  146. ^ Nehemiah 3:12
  147. ^ Nehemiah 12:24, or verse 25 in some Bibles.
  148. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hammoleketh". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  149. ^ For example, NIV, ESV, NASB, HCSB, JPS(1917), and RV.
  150. ^ a b Hitchcock, Roswell D. "Entry for 'Hanameel'". "An Interpreting Dictionary of Scripture Proper Names". . New York, N.Y., 1869.
  151. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hanoch". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  152. ^ Genesis 46:9, Exodus 6:14, Numbers 26:5, 1 Chronicles 5:3.
  153. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Harbona". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  154. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hareph". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  155. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hariph". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  156. ^ Stanley A. Cook (1901) [1899]. "Harhaiah". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  157. ^ 2 Chronicles 34:22
  158. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hasrah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  159. ^ a b Stanley A. Cook (1901) [1899]. "Harnepher". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  160. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Harumaph". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  161. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hashabiah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  162. ^ 1 Chronicles 26:30
  163. ^ 1 Chronicles 25:3, 19
  164. ^ 1 Chronicles 27:17
  165. ^ 2 Chronicles 35:9
  166. ^ Ezra 8:19
  167. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hashabnah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  168. ^ 1 Chronicles 9:14
  169. ^ 1 Chronicles 3:20
  170. ^ Esther 4:5-10
  171. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Hathath". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  172. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hattil". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  173. ^ Nehemiah 11:5
  174. ^ a b c d T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Heldai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  175. ^ Nehemiah 12:12-21
  176. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Helkai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  177. ^ Nehemiah 3:18 and 24.
  178. ^ Nehemiah 10:9
  179. ^ Stanley Arthur Cook (1901) [1899]. "TITLE". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  180. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hermogenes". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  181. ^ Verse 22.
  182. ^ Zephaniah 1:1
  183. ^ Smith's Bible Dictionary
  184. ^ https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0009_0_08927.html
  185. ^ The Interpreter's Bible, Buttrick, 1954, Abingdon Press, Volume III, Snaith, p. 51
  186. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hod". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  187. ^ a b c Stanley Arthur Cook (1901) [1899]. "Hodaviah". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  188. ^ 1 Chronicles 9:7
  189. ^ 1 Chronicles 8:9
  190. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hodesh". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  191. ^ Joshua 10
  192. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hoshama". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  193. ^ a b c T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Hotham". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  194. ^ Sotah 13a
  195. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Huzzab". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  196. ^ See also the New International Version and New Living Translation.
  197. ^ 1 Chronicles 9:8
  198. ^ Nehemiah 11:8
  199. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ibneiah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  200. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ibnijah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  201. ^ 1 Chronicles 7:2
  202. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jibsam". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  203. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Igal". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  204. ^ Jeremiah 35
  205. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Igdaliah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  206. ^ Smith's Bible Dictionary
  207. ^ Ezra 10:20
  208. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Imna". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  209. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Imrah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  210. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Imri". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  211. ^ 1 Chronicles 8:25
  212. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Iphediah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  213. ^ 2 Samuel 20:26
  214. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Iram". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  215. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Iri". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  216. ^ Jeremiah 37:13
  217. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Iru". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  218. ^ a b c Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Ishbi-benob". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  219. ^ 2 Samuel 21:16-17
  220. ^ Pulpit Commentary on 2 Samuel 21, accessed 19 August 2017
  221. ^ Brenton's Septuagint Translation, 2 Samuel 21:16
  222. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Ishod". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  223. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ishmaiah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  224. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ishmerai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  225. ^ 1 Chronicles 8:16
  226. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ispah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  227. ^ 1 Chronicles 8:8-13, 16-17
  228. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ishpan". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  229. ^ See verses 22, 13-14, 8-11.
  230. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ishvah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  231. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Ishvi". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  232. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ithmah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  233. ^ a b c T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Ithran". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  234. ^ See Genesis 36:26 and in the parallel passage, 1 Chronicles 1:41
  235. ^ 1 Chronicles 7:37
  236. ^ a b c d Stanley Arthur Cook (1901) [1899]. "Ittai". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  237. ^ 2 Samuel 15:18-22
  238. ^ 2 Samuel 23:29
  239. ^ 1 Chronicles 7:3
  240. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Izri". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  241. ^ Ezra 10:25
  242. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "TITLE". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  243. ^ 1 Chronicles 11:47
  244. ^ a b Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Jaasiel". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  245. ^ "Mesobaite" in the King James Version, "Mezobaite" in the Revised Version and New International Version, "from Zobah" in the New Living Translation.
  246. ^ Ezra 10:37
  247. ^ 1 Chronicles 24:26-27
  248. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jaaziel". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  249. ^ 1 Chronicles 5:13
  250. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jachan". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  251. ^ a b Stanley Arthur Cook (1901) [1899]. "Jahath". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  252. ^ Ezra 10:15
  253. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jahaziah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  254. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jahzerah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  255. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Jakeh". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  256. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jaanai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  257. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jarib". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  258. ^ Ezra 8:16
  259. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jakim". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  260. ^ Matthew 1:11
  261. ^ 1 Chronicles 4:34-38
  262. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jamlech". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  263. ^ For example, see the King James Version, Revised Version, and New American Standard Bible.
  264. ^ a b Albright, W. F. “The Archaeological Background of the Hebrew Prophets of the Eighth Century”. Journal of Bible and Religion, vol. 8, no. 3, 1940, pp. 134.
  265. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Jareb". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  266. ^ For example, NIV, NLT, ESV, Holman, and NET
  267. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jathniel". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  268. ^ 2 Kings 15:2
  269. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jediael". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  270. ^ 1 Chronicles 12:20
  271. ^ 1 Chronicles 26:2
  272. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Jehallelel". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  273. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jehdeiah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  274. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jehiah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  275. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jehiel". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  276. ^ Jehizkiah appears in the narrative in 2 Chronicles 28:12
  277. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jehoadah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  278. ^ Strong's
  279. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jehozabad". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  280. ^ Clarke, Adam (1831). Commentary and Critical Notes. New York: J. Emory and B. Waugh. 
  281. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "TITLE". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  282. ^ a b c T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jehudijah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  283. ^ a b c d e f g Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Jeiel". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  284. ^ (1 Chronicles 9:35-39)
  285. ^ Ezra 10:43
  286. ^ 1 Chronicles 23:19, 24:23.
  287. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jekamiah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  288. ^ 1 Chronicles 2
  289. ^ 1 Chronicles 3:18
  290. ^ 1 Chronicles 4:18
  291. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jeremai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  292. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jerijah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  293. ^ 1 Chronicles 5:14
  294. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jeshishai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  295. ^ a b The narrative is recorded in 1 Chronicles 4:34-43, with Jeshohaiah himself mentioned in verse 36.
  296. ^ a b Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Jeshohaiah". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  297. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jeush". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  298. ^ Genesis 36:5, 14, 18; 1 Chronicles 1:35.
  299. ^ 2 Chronicles 11:19
  300. ^ Judges 6 - 8
  301. ^ Stanley Arthur Cook (1901) [1899]. "Joash". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  302. ^ 1 Chronicles 4:22
  303. ^ 1 Chronicles 12:3
  304. ^ Nehemiah 11:7
  305. ^ Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges on 1 Samuel 8, accessed 28 April 2017
  306. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k   Singer, Isidore; et al., eds. (1901–1906). "JOEL". Jewish Encyclopedia. New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company. 
  307. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Joshah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  308. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Joshaviah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  309. ^ 1 Chronicles 25:4, 24
  310. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Joshibiah". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  311. ^ Ezra 8:10
  312. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Jozabad". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  313. ^ Easton's Bible Dictionary entry on Julia
  314. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Jushab-hesed". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  315. ^ David Mandel (1 January 2010). Who's Who in the Jewish Bible. Jewish Publication Society. p. 239. ISBN 978-0-8276-1029-3. 
  316. ^ "Kerenhappuch - Smith’s Bible Dictionary - Bible Dictionary". Christnotes.org. Retrieved 2012-04-06. 
  317. ^ According to Easton's Bible Dictionary the name means "Horn of the face-paint = cosmetic-box" "Easton's Bible Dictionary" Check |url= value (help). Ccel.org. 2005-07-13. Retrieved 2012-04-06. 
  318. ^ Job 42:14
  319. ^ Mandel, David (2007). Who's who in the Jewish Bible. Jewish Publication Society. p. 241. ISBN 0-8276-0863-2. 

  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainEaston, Matthew George (1897). "article name needed". Easton's Bible Dictionary (New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons.