List of men's Olympic water polo tournament records and statistics

This is a list of records and statistics of the men's water polo tournament in the Olympic Games since the inaugural official edition in 1900.

List of men's Olympic water polo tournament records and statistics
Water polo pictogram.svg
Governing bodyFINA
Events2 (men: 1; women: 1)
Games
Note: demonstration or exhibition sport years indicated in italics

Champions (menwomen)
Records and statistics (menwomen)
Team appearances (menwomen)
Venues

General statisticsEdit

This is a summary of men's water polo at the Summer Olympics by tournament.

The following table shows winning teams, coaches and captains by tournament. Last updated: 29 December 2020.

Abbreviation and legend
  •  Team  – Olympic winning streak (winning three or more Olympic titles in a row)
  •  Team  – Winning all matches during the tournament
  •  Team  – Host team
  • Team – Defunct team
Winning teams, coaches and captains by tournament
# Men's tournament[1] Winning team Winning coach Winning captain
1   Paris 1900   Great Britain (1st title) N/A   Thomas Coe
2   St. Louis 1904 Water polo was a demonstration sport
3   London 1908   Great Britain (2nd title) N/A   Charles Smith
4   Stockholm 1912   Great Britain (3rd title) N/A   George Wilkinson
5   Antwerp 1920   Great Britain (4th title) N/A   Paul Radmilovic
6   Paris 1924   France (1st title) N/A   Georges Rigal
7   Amsterdam 1928   Germany (1st title) N/A N/A
8   Los Angeles 1932   Hungary (1st title) N/A N/A
9   Berlin 1936   Hungary (2nd title) N/A N/A
10   London 1948   Italy (1st title)   Giuseppe Valle N/A
11   Helsinki 1952   Hungary (3rd title)   Béla Rajki N/A
12   Melbourne 1956   Hungary (4th title)   Béla Rajki (2)   Dezső Gyarmati
13   Rome 1960   Italy (2nd title)   Andres Zolyomy N/A
14   Tokyo 1964   Hungary (5th title)   Károly Laky   Dezső Gyarmati (2)
15   Mexico City 1968   Yugoslavia (1st title)   Aleksandar Sajfert N/A
16   Munich 1972   Soviet Union (1st title) N/A N/A
17   Montreal 1976   Hungary (6th title)   Dezső Gyarmati N/A
18   Moscow 1980   Soviet Union (2nd title)   Boris Popov N/A
19   Los Angeles 1984   Yugoslavia (2nd title)   Ratko Rudić N/A
20   Seoul 1988   Yugoslavia (3rd title)   Ratko Rudić (2) N/A
21   Barcelona 1992   Italy (3rd title)   Ratko Rudić (3) N/A
22   Atlanta 1996   Spain (1st title)   Juan Jané   Manuel Estiarte
23   Sydney 2000   Hungary (7th title)   Dénes Kemény N/A
24   Athens 2004   Hungary (8th title)   Dénes Kemény (2)   Tibor Benedek
25   Beijing 2008   Hungary (9th title)   Dénes Kemény (3)   Tibor Benedek (2)
26   London 2012   Croatia (1st title)   Ratko Rudić (4)   Samir Barać
27   Rio 2016   Serbia (1st title)   Dejan Savić   Živko Gocić
# Men's tournament Winning team Winning coach Winning captain

The following table shows top goalscorers, goalkeepers, sprinters and Most Valuable Players by tournament. Last updated: 29 December 2020.

Notes:

  • Top goalscorer: the water polo player who scored the most goals in a tournament.
  • Top goalkeeper: the water polo player who saved the most shots in a tournament.
  • Top sprinter: the water polo player who won the most sprints in a tournament.
  • Most Valuable Player: the water polo player who was named the Most Valuable Player of a tournament.
Abbreviation and legend
  •  Team  – Olympic winning streak
  •  Team  – Winning all matches during the tournament
  •  Team  – Host team
  • Team – Defunct team
  • Player – Player who won the tournament with his team
  • Eff % – Save efficiency (Saves / Shots)
Top goalscorers, goalkeepers, sprinters and Most Valuable Players by tournament
Year[1] Winning team Top goalscorer
(Goals)
Top goalkeeper
(Saves, Eff %)
Top sprinter
(Sprints won)
Most Valuable Player
(Goals or Saves, Eff %)
1900   Great Britain   John Jarvis (6) N/A N/A N/A
1904 Water polo was a demonstration sport
1908   Great Britain   Fernand Feyaerts (8) N/A N/A N/A
1912   Great Britain   Robert Andersson (9)
1920   Great Britain   Erik Andersson (10)
1924   France   Pierre Dewin (14)
1928   Germany   Ferenc Keserű (10)
1932   Hungary   Philip Daubenspeck (14)
1936   Hungary   Hans Schneider (22)
1948   Italy   Aldo Ghira (18)[a]
1952   Hungary   István Szívós Sr. (16)
  Ruud van Feggelen (16)[b]
1956   Hungary   Petre Mshvenieradze (11)
1960   Italy   Fred Tisue (12)
  Aurel Zahan (12)
1964   Hungary   Nico van der Voet (10)
1968   Yugoslavia   Nico van der Voet (33)
1972   Soviet Union   Carlos Sánchez (18)
1976   Hungary   Tamás Faragó (22)
1980   Soviet Union   Manuel Estiarte (21)
1984   Yugoslavia   Manuel Estiarte (34)
1988   Yugoslavia   Manuel Estiarte (27)
1992   Italy   Tibor Benedek (22)
  Manuel Estiarte (22)
1996   Spain   Tibor Benedek (19)   Arie van de Bunt (81, 52.6%)
2000   Hungary   Aleksandar Šapić (18)   Dan Hackett (70, 51.9%)   Brad Schumacher (20)
2004   Hungary   Aleksandar Šapić (18)   Nikolay Maksimov (62, 59.6%)   Pietro Figlioli (24)   Gergely Kiss (14 goals)
2008   Hungary   Alessandro Calcaterra (27)   Stefano Tempesti (83, 49.1%)   Pietro Figlioli (21) N/A
2012   Croatia   Andrija Prlainović (22)   Stefano Tempesti (87, 59.2%)   Pietro Figlioli (19)
  Rhys Howden (19)
  Josip Pavić (85 saves, 70.2%)
2016   Serbia   Filip Filipović (19)
  Guillermo Molina (19)
  Slobodan Soro (81, 53.3%)   Rhys Howden (18)   Filip Filipović (19 goals)
Year Winning team Top goalscorer
(Goals)
Top goalkeeper
(Saves, Eff %)
Top sprinter
(Sprints won)
Most Valuable Player
(Goals or Saves, Eff %)

Confederation statisticsEdit

Best performances by tournamentEdit

This is a summary of the best performances of each confederation in each tournament.[1] Last updated: 15 January 2021.

Note: italic number in header means demonstration tournament was held.

Legend
  •  1st  – Champions
  •  2nd  – Runners-up
  •  3rd  – Third place
  •  4th  – Fourth place
  •  Q  – Qualified for forthcoming tournament
Confederation 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20
Africa – CANA 7th 10th 9th 12th 15th 12th Q
Americas – ASUA 4th 3rd 7th 3rd 9th 10th 4th 5th 7th 9th 5th 3rd 7th 5th 2nd 2nd 4th 7th 6th 7th 2nd 8th 10th Q
Asia – AASF 4th 14th 12th 21st 10th 14th 11th 12th 15th 12th 9th 11th 9th 11th 12th 11th 12th Q
Europe – LEN 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st Q
Oceania – OSA 18th 19th 9th 15th 10th 12th 11th 7th 5th 8th 5th 8th 9th 8th 7th 9th Q
Total teams 7 4 6 12 13 14 5 16 18 21 10 16 13 15 16 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

All-time best performancesEdit

This is a summary of the best performances of each confederation at the Olympics.[1] Last updated: 15 January 2021.

Legend
  • Year* – As host team
  • Team – Defunct team
Confederation Best performance Men's team
Africa – CANA 7th   Egypt (1948)
Americas – ASUA 2nd   United States (1984, 1988, 2008)
Asia – AASF 4th   Japan (1932)
Europe – LEN 1st   Croatia (2012),   France (1924*),   Germany (1928),   Great Britain (1900, 1908*, 1912, 1920),   Hungary (1932, 1936, 1952, 1956, 1964, 1976, 2000, 2004, 2008),   Italy (1948, 1960*, 1992),   Serbia (2016),   Soviet Union (1972, 1980*),   Spain (1996),   Yugoslavia (1968, 1984, 1988)
Oceania – OSA 5th   Australia (1984, 1992)

Team statisticsEdit

Apps Appearances Ref Reference Rk Rank

Number of appearances by teamEdit

The following table is pre-sorted by number of appearances (in descending order), year of the last appearance (in ascending order), year of the first appearance (in ascending order), name of the team (in ascending order), respectively. Last updated: 15 January 2021.

Abbreviation and legend
  • Year* – As host team
  • Team – Defunct team
  • Apps – Appearances
Number of appearances by team
Rk Men's team[1] Apps Record
streak
Active
streak
Debut Most
recent
Best finish Confederation
1   Hungary 22 13 8 1912 2016 Champions Europe – LEN
2   United States 21 12 9 1920 2016 Runners-up Americas – ASUA
3   Italy 20 18 18 1920 2016 Champions Europe – LEN
4   Netherlands 17 7 0 1908 2000 Third place Europe – LEN
  Spain 17 10 10 1920 2016 Champions Europe – LEN
6   Australia 16 6 5 1948 2016 Fifth place Oceania – OSA
7   Greece 15 10 10 1920 2016 Fourth place Europe – LEN
8   Yugoslavia 12 12 0 1936 1988 Champions Europe – LEN
9   Belgium 11 5 0 1900 1964 Runners-up Europe – LEN
  Great Britain 11 5 0 1900 2012* Champions Europe – LEN
  France 11 4 1 1900* 2016 Champions Europe – LEN
12   Soviet Union 9 8 0 1952 1988 Champions Europe – LEN
  Germany 9 3 0 1900 2008 Champions Europe – LEN
  Romania 9 4 0 1952 2012 Fourth place Europe – LEN
15   Sweden 8 4 0 1908 1980 Runners-up Europe – LEN
  Brazil 8 3 1 1920 2016* Sixth place Americas – ASUA
  Japan 8 4 1 1932 2016 Fourth place Asia – AASF
18   Egypt 6 3 0 1948 2004 Seventh place Africa – CANA
  Croatia 6 6 6 1996 2016 Champions Europe – LEN
20    Switzerland 5 3 0 1920 1948 Eleventh place Europe – LEN
  West Germany 5 3 0 1968 1988 Third place Europe – LEN
  Czechoslovakia 5 3 0 1920 1992 Sixth place Europe – LEN
  Cuba 5 4 0 1968 1992 Fifth place Americas – ASUA
24   Argentina 4 2 0 1928 1960 Tenth place Americas – ASUA
  Mexico 4 3 0 1952 1976 Tenth place Americas – ASUA
  Canada 4 2 0 1972 2008 Ninth place Americas – ASUA
27   Austria 3 1 0 1912 1952 Fourth place Europe – LEN
  United Team of Germany 3 3 0 1956 1964 Sixth place Europe – LEN
  Russia 3 3 0 1996 2004 Runners-up Europe – LEN
  China 3 2 0 1984 2008* Ninth place Asia – AASF
  Kazakhstan 3 2 0 2000 2012 Ninth place Asia – AASF
  Montenegro 3 3 3 2008 2016 Fourth place Europe – LEN
  Serbia 3 3 3 2008 2016 Champions Europe – LEN
34   Ireland 2 2 0 1924 1928 Ninth place Europe – LEN
  Malta 2 1 0 1928 1936 Eighth place Europe – LEN
  Uruguay 2 2 0 1936 1948 Thirteenth place Americas – ASUA
  India 2 2 0 1948 1952 Twelfth place Asia – AASF
  South Africa 2 1 0 1952 1960 Ninth place Africa – CANA
  Bulgaria 2 1 0 1972 1980 Eleventh place Europe – LEN
  FR Yugoslavia[c] 2 2 0 1996 2000 Third place Europe – LEN
41   Luxembourg 1 1 0 1928 1928 Eleventh place Europe – LEN
  Iceland 1 1 0 1936 1936 Fifteenth place Europe – LEN
  Chile 1 1 0 1948 1948 Seventeenth place Americas – ASUA
  Portugal 1 1 0 1952 1952 Twentieth place Europe – LEN
  Singapore 1 1 0 1956 1956 Tenth place Asia – AASF
  East Germany 1 1 0 1968 1968 Sixth place Europe – LEN
  Iran 1 1 0 1976 1976 Twelfth place Asia – AASF
  South Korea 1 1 0 1988* 1988* Twelfth place Asia – AASF
  Unified Team[d] 1 1 0 1992 1992 Third place Europe – LEN
  Ukraine 1 1 0 1996 1996 Twelfth place Europe – LEN
  Slovakia 1 1 0 2000 2000 Twelfth place Europe – LEN
  Serbia and Montenegro 1 1 0 2004 2004 Runners-up Europe – LEN
Rk Men's team Apps Record
streak
Active
streak
Debut Most
recent
Best finish Confederation

Comprehensive team results by tournamentEdit

Note: Results of Olympic qualification tournaments are not included. Numbers refer to the final placing of each team at the respective Games; italic number in header means demonstration tournament was held. Last updated: 12 December 2020.

Legend
  •  1  – Champions
  •  2  – Runners-up
  •  3  – Third place
  •  4  – Fourth place
  •   – Disqualified
  •  Q  – Qualified for forthcoming tournament
  •  —  – The nation did not participate the Games
  •     – Hosts
  • = – More than one team tied for that rank
  • Team – Defunct team
Abbreviation
  • EUA – United Team of Germany
  • FRG – West Germany
  • FRY – FR Yugoslavia
  • GDR – East Germany
  • SCG – Serbia and Montenegro
Africa – CANA (2 teams)
Men's team[1] 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
  Egypt 7 10 13 12 15 12 6
  South Africa 14 9 Q 2
Americas – ASUA (8 teams)
Men's team[1] 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
  Argentina 13 10 16 11 4
  Brazil 6 [e] 9 12 13 13 12 8 8
  Canada 16 9 10 11 4
  Chile 17 1
  Cuba 8 9 7 5 8 5
  Mexico 18 11 13 10 4
  United States 4 3 7 3 9 11 4 5 7 9 5 3 2 2 4 7 6 7 2 8 10 Q 21
  Uruguay 13 16 2
Asia – AASF (7 teams)
Men's team[1] 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
  PR China 9 11 12 3
  India 12 21 2
  Iran 12 1
  Japan 4 14 14 11 12 15 11 12 Q 8
  Kazakhstan Part of Soviet Union[f] [d] 9 11 11 Q 3
  Singapore 10 1
  South Korea 12 1
Europe – LEN (34 teams)
Men's team[1] 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
  Austria 4 7 13 3
  Belgium 2 2 3 2 2 6 3 4 6 16 7 11
  Bulgaria 11 12 2
  Croatia Part of Yugoslavia 2 7 10 6 1 2 6
  Czechoslovakia 12 6 10 11 12 Defunct 5
  East Germany Part of Germany P. of EUA 6 Part of Germany 1
  France 3[g] 6 9 1 3 4 6 10 10 11 11 11
  Germany =5 1 2 2 15 See EUA See FRG and GDR 7 9 5 10 9
  Great Britain 1 1 1 1 8 4 8 13 12 7 12 11
Men's team 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
  Greece 8 13 15 14 14 10 8 9 10 6 10 4 7 9 6 15
  Hungary 5 5 2 1 1 2 1 1 3 1 3 2 1 3 5 6 4 1 1 1 5 5 Q 22
  Iceland 15 1
  Ireland 9 14 2
  Italy 10 11 1 3 4 1 4 4 6 2 8 7 7 1 3 5 8 9 2 3 Q 20
  Luxembourg 11 1
  Malta 8 16 2
  Montenegro Part of Yugoslavia P. of FRY / SCG 4 4 4 3
Men's team 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
  Netherlands 4 5 7 5 5 3 5 8 8 7 7 3 6 6 9 10 11 17
  Portugal 20 1
  Romania 17 8 5 5 8 4 9 11 10 9
  Russian Federation Part of Soviet Union[f] [d] 5 2 3 3
  Serbia Part of Yugoslavia P. of FRY / SCG 3 3 1 Q 3
  Serbia and Montenegro Part of Yugoslavia See FRY 2 Defunct 1
  Slovakia Part of Czechoslovakia 12 1
  Soviet Union[f] 7 3 2 3 2 1 8 1 3 Defunct 9
  Spain 7 10 9 8 8 9 10 4 4 6 2 1 4 6 5 6 7 Q 17
Men's team 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
  Sweden 3 2 3 4 6 5 11 11 8
   Switzerland 11 12 12 12 14 5
  Ukraine Part of Soviet Union[f] [d] 12 1
  Unified Team[d] Part of Soviet Union[f] 3 Defunct 1
  United Team of Germany See Germany 6 6 6 See FRG and GDR See Germany 3
  West Germany Part of Germany P. of EUA 10 4 6 3 4 Part of Germany 5
  Yugoslavia 10 9 2 2 4 2 1 5 5 2 1 1 Defunct 12
  FR Yugoslavia[c] Part of Yugoslavia 8 3 Defunct 2
Oceania – OSA (1 team)
Men's team[1] 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
  Australia 18 19 9 15 10 12 11 7 5 8 5 8 9 8 7 9 Q 16
Total teams 7 4 6 12 13 14 5 16 18 21 10 16 13 15 16 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

Best finishes by teamEdit

The following table is pre-sorted by best finish (in descending order), name of the team (in ascending order), respectively. Last updated: 16 December 2020.

Abbreviation and legend
  • Year* – As host team
  • Team – Defunct team
  • Apps – Appearances
Best finishes by team
Rk Men's team[1] Best finish Apps Confederation
1   Hungary Champions (1932, 1936, 1952, 1956, 1964, 1976, 2000, 2004, 2008) 22 Europe – LEN
2   Great Britain Champions (1900, 1908*, 1912, 1920) 11 Europe – LEN
3   Italy Champions (1948, 1960*, 1992) 20 Europe – LEN
  Yugoslavia Champions (1968, 1984, 1988) 12 Europe – LEN
5   Soviet Union Champions (1972, 1980*) 9 Europe – LEN
6   Croatia Champions (2012) 6 Europe – LEN
  France Champions (1924*) 11 Europe – LEN
  Germany Champions (1928) 9 Europe – LEN
  Serbia Champions (2016) 3 Europe – LEN
  Spain Champions (1996) 17 Europe – LEN
11   Belgium Runners-up (1900, 1908, 1920*, 1924) 11 Europe – LEN
12   United States Runners-up (1984*, 1988, 2008) 21 Americas – ASUA
13   Russia Runners-up (2000) 3 Europe – LEN
  Serbia and Montenegro Runners-up (2004) 1 Europe – LEN
  Sweden Runners-up (1912*) 8 Europe – LEN
16   Netherlands Third place (1948, 1976) 17 Europe – LEN
17   FR Yugoslavia[c] Third place (2000) 2 Europe – LEN
  Unified Team[d] Third place (1992) 1 Europe – LEN
  West Germany Third place (1984) 5 Europe – LEN
20   Montenegro Fourth place (2008, 2012, 2016) 3 Europe – LEN
21   Austria Fourth place (1912) 3 Europe – LEN
  Greece Fourth place (2004*) 15 Europe – LEN
  Japan Fourth place (1932) 8 Asia – AASF
  Romania Fourth place (1976) 9 Europe – LEN
25   Australia Fifth place (1984, 1992) 16 Oceania – OSA
26   Cuba Fifth place (1980) 5 Americas – ASUA
27   United Team of Germany Sixth place (1956, 1960, 1964) 3 Europe – LEN
28   Brazil Sixth place (1920) 8 Americas – ASUA
  Czechoslovakia Sixth place (1924) 5 Europe – LEN
  East Germany Sixth place (1968) 1 Europe – LEN
31   Egypt Seventh place (1948) 6 Africa – CANA
32   Malta Eighth place (1928) 2 Europe – LEN
33   Canada Ninth place (1976*) 4 Americas – ASUA
  China Ninth place (1984) 3 Asia – AASF
  Ireland Ninth place (1924) 2 Europe – LEN
  Kazakhstan Ninth place (2000) 3 Asia – AASF
  South Africa Ninth place (1960) 2 Africa – CANA
38   Argentina Tenth place (1948) 4 Americas – ASUA
  Mexico Tenth place (1976) 4 Americas – ASUA
  Singapore Tenth place (1956) 1 Asia – AASF
41   Bulgaria Eleventh place (1972) 2 Europe – LEN
  Luxembourg Eleventh place (1928) 1 Europe – LEN
   Switzerland Eleventh place (1920) 5 Europe – LEN
44   India Twelfth place (1948) 2 Asia – AASF
  Iran Twelfth place (1976) 1 Asia – AASF
  South Korea Twelfth place (1988*) 1 Asia – AASF
  Slovakia Twelfth place (2000) 1 Europe – LEN
  Ukraine Twelfth place (1996) 1 Europe – LEN
49   Uruguay Thirteenth place (1936) 2 Americas – ASUA
50   Iceland Fifteenth place (1936) 1 Europe – LEN
51   Chile Seventeenth place (1948) 1 Americas – ASUA
52   Portugal Twentieth place (1952) 1 Europe – LEN
Rk Men's team Best finish Apps Confederation

Finishes in the top fourEdit

The following table is pre-sorted by total finishes in the top four (in descending order), number of Olympic gold medals (in descending order), number of Olympic silver medals (in descending order), number of Olympic bronze medals (in descending order), name of the team (in ascending order), respectively. Last updated: 12 December 2020.

Legend
  • Year* – As host team
  • Team – Defunct team
Rk Men's team[1] Total Champions Runners-up Third place Fourth place First Last
1   Hungary 16 9 (1932, 1936, 1952, 1956, 1964, 1976, 2000, 2004, 2008) 3 (1928, 1948, 1972) 3 (1960, 1968, 1980) 1 (1996) 1928 2008
2   Italy 13 3 (1948, 1960*, 1992) 2 (1976, 2012) 3 (1952, 1996, 2016) 3 (1956, 1964, 1968) 1948 2016
3   United States 9 3 (1984*, 1988, 2008) 3 (1924, 1932*, 1972) 3 (1920, 1952, 1992) 1920 2008
4   Yugoslavia 8 3 (1968, 1984, 1988) 4 (1952, 1956, 1964, 1980) 1 (1960) 1952 1988
5   Soviet Union 7 2 (1972, 1980*) 2 (1960, 1968) 3 (1956, 1964, 1988) 1956 1988
6   Belgium 7 4 (1900, 1908, 1920*, 1924) 2 (1912, 1936) 1 (1948) 1900 1948
7   Great Britain 5 4 (1900, 1908*, 1912, 1920) 1 (1928) 1900 1928
8   Spain 5 1 (1996) 1 (1992*) 3 (1980, 1984, 2000) 1980 2000
9   France 5 1 (1924*) 3 (1900*×2[g], 1928) 1 (1936) 1900 1936
10   Sweden 4 1 (1912*) 2 (1908, 1920) 1 (1924) 1908 1924
11   Croatia 3 1 (2012) 2 (1996, 2016) 1996 2016
  Germany 1 (1928) 2 (1932, 1936*) 1928 1936
13   Serbia 3 1 (2016) 2 (2008, 2012) 2008 2016
14   Netherlands 3 2 (1948, 1976) 1 (1908) 1908 1976
15   West Germany 3 1 (1984) 2 (1972*, 1988) 1972 1988
16   Montenegro 3 3 (2008, 2012, 2016) 2008 2016
17   Russia 2 1 (2000) 1 (2004) 2000 2004
18   Serbia and Montenegro 1 1 (2004) 2004 2004
19   FR Yugoslavia[c] 1 1 (2000) 2000 2000
  Unified Team[d] 1 (1992) 1992 1992
21   Austria 1 1 (1912) 1912 1912
  Greece 1 (2004*) 2004 2004
  Japan 1 (1932) 1932 1932
  Romania 1 (1976) 1976 1976
Rk Men's team Total Champions Runners-up Third place Fourth place First Last

Medal tableEdit

The following table is pre-sorted by number of Olympic gold medals (in descending order), number of Olympic silver medals (in descending order), number of Olympic bronze medals (in descending order), name of the team (in ascending order), respectively. Last updated: 12 December 2020.

Hungary is the most successful country in men's Olympic water polo tournament, with nine gold, three silver and three bronze.[1]

Legend
  • Team – Defunct team
RankMen's teamGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Hungary93315
2  Great Britain4004
3  Yugoslavia3407
4  Italy3238
5  Soviet Union2237
6  Croatia1203
  Germany1203
8  Spain1102
9  France[g]1034
10  Serbia1023
11  Belgium0426
12  United States0336
13  Sweden0123
14  Russia0112
15  Serbia and Montenegro0101
16  Netherlands0022
17  FR Yugoslavia[c]0011
  Unified Team[d]0011
  West Germany0011
Totals (19 men's teams)26262779

Champions (results)Edit

 
Serbia men's national water polo team celebrated after the gold medal match of the 2016 Summer Olympics.

The following table shows results of Olympic champions in men's water polo by tournament. Last updated: 12 December 2020.

Legend
  •  6  – Winning 6 matches during the tournament
  •  4  – Drawing 4 matches during the tournament
  •  2  – Losing 2 matches during the tournament
  •  100.0%  – Winning all matches during the tournament
  •  Team  – Olympic winning streak (winning three or more Olympic titles in a row)
  •  Team  – Host team
  • Team – Defunct team
Abbreviation
  • MP – Matches played
  • W – Won
  • D – Drawn
  • L – Lost
  • GF – Goals for
  • GA – Goals against
  • GD – Goals difference
  • GF/MP – Goals for per match
  • GA/MP – Goals against per match
  • GD/MP – Goals difference per match
Results of champions by tournament
# Men's tournament Champions MP W D L Win % GF GA GD GF/MP GA/MP GD/MP
1   Paris 1900   Great Britain (1st title) 3 3 0 0 100.0% 29 3 26 9.667 1.000 8.667
2   St. Louis 1904 Water polo was a demonstration sport
3   London 1908   Great Britain (2nd title) 1[h] 1 0 0 100.0% 9 2 7 9.000 2.000 7.000
4   Stockholm 1912   Great Britain (3rd title) 3 3 0 0 100.0% 21 8 13 7.000 2.667 4.333
5   Antwerp 1920   Great Britain (4th title) 3 3 0 0 100.0% 19 4 15 6.333 1.333 5.000
6   Paris 1924   France (1st title) 4 4 0 0 100.0% 16 6 10 4.000 1.500 2.500
7   Amsterdam 1928   Germany (1st title) 3 3 0 0 100.0% 18 10 8 6.000 3.333 2.667
8   Los Angeles 1932   Hungary (1st title) 3[e] 3 0 0 100.0% 30 2 28 10.000 0.667 9.333
9   Berlin 1936   Hungary (2nd title) 7 6 1 0 85.7% 44 4 40 6.286 0.571 5.714
10   London 1948   Italy (1st title) 7[a] 6 1 0 85.7% 35 14 21 5.000 2.000 3.000
11   Helsinki 1952   Hungary (3rd title) 8 6 2 0 75.0% 53 16 37 6.625 2.000 4.625
12   Melbourne 1956   Hungary (4th title) 6 6 0 0 100.0% 26 4 22 4.333 0.667 3.667
13   Rome 1960   Italy (2nd title) 7 6 1 0 85.7% 31 12 19 4.429 1.714 2.714
14   Tokyo 1964   Hungary (5th title) 6 5 1 0 83.3% 34 13 21 5.667 2.167 3.500
15   Mexico City 1968   Yugoslavia (1st title) 9 7 1 1 77.8% 86 35 51 9.556 3.889 5.667
16   Munich 1972   Soviet Union (1st title) 8 6 2 0 75.0% 48 24 24 6.000 3.000 3.000
17   Montreal 1976   Hungary (6th title) 8 7 1 0 87.5% 45 32 13 5.625 4.000 1.625
18   Moscow 1980   Soviet Union (2nd title) 8 8 0 0 100.0% 58 31 27 7.250 3.875 3.375
19   Los Angeles 1984   Yugoslavia (2nd title) 7 6 1 0 85.7% 72 44 28 10.286 6.286 4.000
20   Seoul 1988   Yugoslavia (3rd title) 7 6 0 1 85.7% 83 55 28 11.857 7.857 4.000
21   Barcelona 1992   Italy (3rd title) 7 5 2 0 71.4% 59 50 9 8.429 7.143 1.286
22   Atlanta 1996   Spain (1st title) 8 6 0 2 75.0% 58 48 10 7.250 6.000 1.250
23   Sydney 2000   Hungary (7th title) 8 6 0 2 75.0% 78 57 21 9.750 7.125 2.625
24   Athens 2004   Hungary (8th title) 7 7 0 0 100.0% 59 39 20 8.429 5.571 2.857
25   Beijing 2008   Hungary (9th title) 7 6 1 0 85.7% 85 55 30 12.143 7.857 4.286
26   London 2012   Croatia (1st title) 8 8 0 0 100.0% 73 42 31 9.125 5.250 3.875
27   Rio 2016   Serbia (1st title) 8 5 2 1 62.5% 80 66 14 10.000 8.250 1.750
# Men's tournament Total 161 138 16 7 85.7% 1249 676 573 7.758 4.199 3.559
Champions MP W D L Win % GF GA GD GF/MP GA/MP GD/MP

Sources:

From 1900 to 1928, single-elimination tournaments were used to determine Olympic champions in men's water polo. The following table shows men's teams that won all matches during the Olympic tournament since 1932.

Winning all matches during the tournament
(since 1932)
# Year Champions MP W D L Win %
1 1932   Hungary (1st title) 3[e] 3 0 0 100.0%
2 1956   Hungary (4th title) 6 6 0 0 100.0%
3 1980   Soviet Union (2nd title) 8 8 0 0 100.0%
4 2004   Hungary (8th title) 7 7 0 0 100.0%
5 2012   Croatia (1st title) 8 8 0 0 100.0%

The following tables show records of goals for per match.

Historical progression of records – goals for per match
Goals for
per match
Achievement Year Champions Date of
winning gold
Duration of record
9.667 Set record 1900   Great Britain (1st title) 12 August 1900 32 years, 1 day
10.000 Broke record 1932   Hungary (1st title) 13 August 1932 51 years, 363 days
10.286 Broke record 1984   Yugoslavia (2nd title) 10 August 1984 4 years, 52 days
11.857 Broke record 1988   Yugoslavia (3rd title) 1 October 1988 19 years, 328 days
12.143 Broke record 2008   Hungary (9th title) 24 August 2008 12 years, 152 days

The following tables show records of goals against per match.

The following tables show records of goals difference per match.

Champions (squads)Edit

The following table shows number of players and average age, height and weight of Olympic champions in men's water polo by tournament. Last updated: 12 December 2020.

Legend
  •  Team  – Olympic winning streak
  •  Team  – Winning all matches during the tournament
  •  Team  – Host team
  • Team – Defunct team
Winning squads by tournament
# Men's tournament Champions Players Returning Olympians Average
Number Number % Age Height Weight
1   Paris 1900   Great Britain (1st title) 7 0 0.0%
2   St. Louis 1904 Water polo was a demonstration sport
3   London 1908   Great Britain (2nd title) 7 0 0.0% 26 years, 111 days 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
4   Stockholm 1912   Great Britain (3rd title) 7 4 57.1% 29 years, 16 days
5   Antwerp 1920   Great Britain (4th title) 7 3 42.9% 33 years, 279 days
6   Paris 1924   France (1st title) 7 3 42.9% 26 years, 303 days
7   Amsterdam 1928   Germany (1st title) 8 0 0.0% 24 years, 329 days
8   Los Angeles 1932   Hungary (1st title) 10 7 70.0% 27 years, 291 days
9   Berlin 1936   Hungary (2nd title) 11 5 45.5% 26 years, 66 days
10   London 1948   Italy (1st title) 9 0 0.0% 30 years, 203 days
11   Helsinki 1952   Hungary (3rd title) 13 6 46.2% 26 years, 337 days
12   Melbourne 1956   Hungary (4th title) 12 7 58.3% 26 years, 148 days 1.81 m (5 ft 11 in)[i] 80 kg (176 lb)[j]
13   Rome 1960   Italy (2nd title) 12 3 25.0% 22 years, 363 days 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 81 kg (179 lb)
14   Tokyo 1964   Hungary (5th title) 12 10 83.3% 28 years, 208 days 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 82 kg (181 lb)
15   Mexico City 1968   Yugoslavia (1st title) 11 5 45.5% 26 years, 151 days 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 94 kg (207 lb)
16   Munich 1972   Soviet Union (1st title) 11 5 45.5% 26 years, 351 days 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 87 kg (192 lb)
17   Montreal 1976   Hungary (6th title) 11 6 54.5% 25 years, 333 days 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) 88 kg (194 lb)
18   Moscow 1980   Soviet Union (2nd title) 11 4 36.4% 25 years, 117 days 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 87 kg (192 lb)
19   Los Angeles 1984   Yugoslavia (2nd title) 13 3 23.1% 23 years, 362 days 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 92 kg (203 lb)
20   Seoul 1988   Yugoslavia (3rd title) 13 6 46.2% 23 years, 341 days 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in) 94 kg (207 lb)
21   Barcelona 1992   Italy (3rd title) 13 7 53.8% 26 years, 224 days 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)[k] 81 kg (179 lb)[l]
22   Atlanta 1996   Spain (1st title) 13 9 69.2% 26 years, 279 days 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) 81 kg (179 lb)
23   Sydney 2000   Hungary (7th title) 13 5 38.5% 25 years, 254 days 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 93 kg (205 lb)
24   Athens 2004   Hungary (8th title) 13 10 76.9% 27 years, 344 days 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) 96 kg (212 lb)
25   Beijing 2008   Hungary (9th title) 13 9 69.2% 29 years, 248 days 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) 100 kg (220 lb)
26   London 2012   Croatia (1st title) 13 8 61.5% 29 years, 85 days 1.97 m (6 ft 6 in) 102 kg (225 lb)
27   Rio 2016   Serbia (1st title) 13 9 69.2% 28 years, 205 days 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in) 96 kg (212 lb)
# Men's tournament Champions Number Number % Age Height Weight
Players Returning Olympians Average

Sources:

The following tables show records of the number of returning Olympians.

The following tables show records of average age.

The following tables show records of average height.

Historical progression of records – average height (statistics since 1956)
Average height Achievement Year Champions Date of
winning gold
Duration of record
1.81 m (5 ft 11 in)[i] Set record 1956   Hungary (4th title) 7 December 1956 3 years, 271 days
1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) Broke record 1960   Italy (2nd title) 3 September 1960 8 years, 53 days
Tied record 1964   Hungary (5th title) 18 October 1964
1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) Broke record 1968   Yugoslavia (1st title) 26 October 1968 15 years, 289 days
1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) Broke record 1984   Yugoslavia (2nd title) 10 August 1984 4 years, 52 days
1.95 m (6 ft 5 in) Broke record 1988   Yugoslavia (3rd title) 1 October 1988 15 years, 333 days
1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) Broke record 2004   Hungary (8th title) 29 August 2004 7 years, 349 days
Tied record 2008   Hungary (9th title) 24 August 2008
1.97 m (6 ft 6 in) Broke record 2012   Croatia (1st title) 12 August 2012 8 years, 164 days

The following tables show records of average weight.

Historical progression of records – average weight (statistics since 1956)
Average weight Achievement Year Champions Date of
winning gold
Duration of record
80 kg (176 lb)[j] Set record 1956   Hungary (4th title) 7 December 1956 3 years, 271 days
81 kg (179 lb) Broke record 1960   Italy (2nd title) 3 September 1960 4 years, 45 days
82 kg (181 lb) Broke record 1964   Hungary (5th title) 18 October 1964 4 years, 8 days
94 kg (207 lb) Broke record 1968   Yugoslavia (1st title) 26 October 1968 35 years, 308 days
Tied record 1988   Yugoslavia (3rd title) 1 October 1988
96 kg (212 lb) Broke record 2004   Hungary (8th title) 29 August 2004 3 years, 361 days
100 kg (220 lb) Broke record 2008   Hungary (9th title) 24 August 2008 3 years, 354 days
102 kg (225 lb) Broke record 2012   Croatia (1st title) 12 August 2012 8 years, 164 days

Olympic and world champions (teams)Edit

Team recordsEdit

Teams having equal quantities in the tables below are ordered by the tournament the quantity was attained in (the teams that attained the quantity first are listed first). If the quantity was attained by more than one team in the same tournament, these teams are ordered alphabetically. Last updated: 10 January 2021.

Legend
  • Year* – As host team
  • Team – Defunct team

AppearancesEdit

Most appearances
22, Hungary (1912, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016).
Most appearances, never winning a title
21, United States (1920, 1924, 1928, 1932*, 1936, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1984*, 1988, 1992, 1996*, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016).
Most appearances, never finishing in the top two
17, Netherlands (1908, 1920, 1924, 1928*, 1936, 1948, 1952, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1992, 1996, 2000).
Most appearances, never winning a medal
16, Australia (1948, 1952, 1956*, 1960, 1964, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 2000*, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016).
Most appearances, never finishing in the top four
16, Australia (1948, 1952, 1956*, 1960, 1964, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 2000*, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016).
Fewest appearances
1, Luxembourg (1928); Iceland (1936); Chile (1948); Portugal (1952); Singapore (1956); East Germany (1968); Iran (1976); South Korea (1988*); Unified Team[d] (1992); Ukraine (1996); Slovakia (2000); Serbia and Montenegro (2004).
Fewest appearances, winning a title
3, Serbia (2008, 2012, 2016).
Fewest appearances, finishing in the top two
1, Serbia and Montenegro (2004).
Fewest appearances, finishing in the top two, active team
3, Russia (1996, 2000, 2004); Serbia (2008, 2012, 2016).
Fewest appearances, winning a medal
1, Unified Team[d] (1992); Serbia and Montenegro (2004).
Fewest appearances, winning a medal, active team
3, Russia (1996, 2000, 2004); Serbia (2008, 2012, 2016).
Fewest appearances, finishing in the top four
1, Unified Team[d] (1992); Serbia and Montenegro (2004).
Fewest appearances, finishing in the top four, active team
3, Austria (1912, 1936, 1952); Russia (1996, 2000, 2004); Montenegro (2008, 2012, 2016); Serbia (2008, 2012, 2016).

Top fourEdit

Most titles won
9, Hungary (1932, 1936, 1952, 1956, 1964, 1976, 2000, 2004, 2008).
Most second-place finishes
4, Belgium (1900, 1908, 1920*, 1924); Yugoslavia (1952, 1956, 1964, 1980).
Most third-place finishes
3, France (1900*×2[g], 1928); United States (1924, 1932*, 1972); Hungary (1960, 1968, 1980); Soviet Union (1956, 1964, 1988); Italy (1952, 1996, 2016).
Most fourth-place finishes
3, Italy (1956, 1964, 1968); United States (1920, 1952, 1992); Spain (1980, 1984, 2000); Montenegro (2008, 2012, 2016).
Most finishes in the top two
12, Hungary (1928, 1932, 1936, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1964, 1972, 1976, 2000, 2004, 2008).
Most finishes in the top two, never winning a title
4, Belgium (1900, 1908, 1920*, 1924).
Most finishes in the top three
15, Hungary (1928, 1932, 1936, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 2000, 2004, 2008).
Most finishes in the top three, never winning a title
6, Belgium (1900, 1908, 1912, 1920*, 1924, 1936); United States (1924, 1932, 1972, 1984, 1988, 2008).
Most finishes in the top three, never finishing in the top two
2, Netherlands (1948, 1976).
Most finishes in the top four
16, Hungary (1928, 1932, 1936, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008).
Most finishes in the top four, never winning a title
9, United States (1920, 1924, 1932*, 1952, 1972, 1984*, 1988, 1992, 2008).
Most finishes in the top four, never finishing in the top two
3, Netherlands (1908, 1948, 1976); West Germany (1972*, 1984, 1988); Montenegro (2008, 2012, 2016).
Most finishes in the top four, never winning a medal
3, Montenegro (2008, 2012, 2016).
Fewest finishes in the top two, winning a title
1, France (1924*); Serbia (2016).
Fewest finishes in the top three, winning a title
2, Spain (1992*, 1996).
Fewest finishes in the top three, finishing in the top two
1, Serbia and Montenegro (2004).
Fewest finishes in the top three, finishing in the top two, active team
2, Spain (1992*, 1996); Russia (2000, 2004).
Fewest finishes in the top four, winning a title
3, Germany (1928, 1932, 1936*); Croatia (1996, 2012, 2016); Serbia (2008, 2012, 2016).
Fewest finishes in the top four, finishing in the top two
1, Serbia and Montenegro (2004).
Fewest finishes in the top four, finishing in the top two, active team
2, Russia (2000, 2004).
Fewest finishes in the top four, winning a medal
1, Unified Team[d] (1992); FR Yugoslavia (2000); Serbia and Montenegro (2004).
Fewest finishes in the top four, winning a medal, active team
2, Russia (2000, 2004).

ConsecutiveEdit

Most consecutive titles won
3, Great Britain (1908*–1912–1920); Hungary (2000–2004–2008).
Most consecutive second-place finishes
2, Belgium (1920*–1924); Germany (1932–1936*); Yugoslavia (1952–1956); United States (1984*–1988).
Most consecutive third-place finishes
2, Serbia (2008–2012).
Most consecutive fourth-place finishes
3, Montenegro (2008–2012–2016).
Most consecutive finishes in the top two
6, Hungary (1928–1932–1936–1948–1952–1956).
Most consecutive finishes in the top three
12, Hungary (1928–1932–1936–1948–1952–1956–1960–1964–1968–1972–1976–1980).
Most consecutive finishes in the top four
12, Hungary (1928–1932–1936–1948–1952–1956–1960–1964–1968–1972–1976–1980).
Most consecutive appearances
18, Italy (1948–1952–1956–1960*–1964–1968–1972–1976–1980–1984–1988–1992–1996–2000–2004–2008–2012–2016).
Biggest improvement in position in consecutive tournaments
Did not participate/qualify, then won the title, Germany (1924–1928); Italy (1936–1948).

GapsEdit

Longest gap between successive titles
24 years, Hungary (1976–2000).
Longest gap between successive second-place finishes
36 years, Italy (1976–2012).
Longest gap between successive third-place finishes
44 years, Italy (1952–1996).
Longest gap between successive fourth-place finishes
40 years, United States (1952–1992).
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top two
24 years, Hungary (1976–2000).
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top three
40 years, United States (1932*–1972).
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top four
40 years, Netherlands (1908–1948).
Longest gap between successive appearances
56 years, Czechoslovakia (1936–1992); Great Britain (1956–2012*).

Debuting teamsEdit

Best finish by a debuting team
Champions, Great Britain (1900).
Best finish by a debuting team after 1900
Runners-up, Croatia (1996); Serbia and Montenegro (2004).
Worst finish by a debuting team
20th position, Portugal (1952).
Worst finish by a debuting team after 1972
12th position (last position), Iran (1976); South Korea (1988*); Ukraine (1996); Slovakia (2000).

Host teamsEdit

Best finish by host team
Champions, Great Britain (1908*); France (1924*); Italy (1960*); Soviet Union (1980*).
Worst finish by host team
Did not participate/qualify, Finland (1952*).
Worst finish by host team that participates in the tournament
13th position, Great Britain (1948*).
Worst finish by host team that participates in the tournament after 1972
12th position (last position), South Korea (1988*); China (2008*); Great Britain (2012*).
Best finish by last host team
Champions, Great Britain (1912); Spain (1996).
Worst finish by last host team
Did not participate/qualify, Netherlands (1932); Germany (1948); Canada (1980); Soviet Union (1984, withdrew); South Korea (1992); China (2012); Great Britain (2016).
Worst finish by last host team that participates in the tournament
15th position, Australia (1960).
Worst finish by last host team that participates in the tournament after 1972
9th position, Australia (2004).

Defending championsEdit

Best finish by defending champions
Champions, Great Britain (1912, 1920); Hungary (1936, 1956, 2004, 2008); Yugoslavia (1988).
Worst finish by defending champions
Did not participate/qualify, Soviet Union (1984, withdrew); Yugoslavia (1992, defunct).
Worst finish by defending champions that participates in the next tournament
8th position, Great Britain (1924); Soviet Union (1976).

Defending runners-upEdit

Best finish by defending runners-up
Champions, Hungary (1932, 1952, 1976); Soviet Union (1972); Spain (1996); Yugoslavia (1968, 1984).
Worst finish by defending runners-up
Did not participate/qualify, Germany (1948); Serbia and Montenegro (2008, defunct).
Worst finish by defending runners-up that participates in the next tournament
8th position, Italy (1980); United States (2012).

PopulationEdit

Most populated country, participant
China (2008*), 1,324,655,000 (source)
Least populated country, participant
Iceland (1928), 104,000 (source)
Least populated country, participant, after 1972
Montenegro (2008), 616,000 (source)
Most populated country, hosts
China (2008*), 1,324,655,000 (source)
Least populated country, hosts
Finland (1952*), 4,090,000 (source)
Most populated country, champions
Soviet Union (1980*), more than 260,000,000 (source)
Least populated country, champions
Croatia (2012), 4,267,000 (source)
Most populated country, runners-up
United States (2008), 304,375,000 (source)
Least populated country, runners-up
Croatia (1996), 4,516,000 (source)
Most populated country, third place
Unified Team[d] (1992), more than 280,000,000 (source)
Least populated country, third place
Sweden (1908), 5,404,000 (source)
Most populated country, fourth place
United States (1992), 256,514,000 (source)
Least populated country, fourth place
Montenegro (2008), 616,000 (source)

Player statisticsEdit

(C) Captain Apps Appearances Ref Reference Rk Rank
L/R Handedness Pos Playing position FP Field player GK Goalkeeper

Age recordsEdit

The following tables show the oldest and youngest players who competed in men's water polo at the Summer Olympics, and the oldest and youngest male Olympic medalists in water polo. Last updated: 12 December 2020.

Legend
  •  Team  – Host team
  • Player – Player who won the tournament with his team

Appearance

Record Age of the
first Olympic
water polo match
Player Men's team Pos Date of birth Date of the
first Olympic
water polo match
Ref
Oldest Olympic debutant 42 years, 303 days Alexandr Polukhin   Kazakhstan GK 15 October 1961 13 August 2004 [2]
Youngest male Olympian 14 years, 133 days Alfonso Tusell   Spain FP 11 April 1906 22 August 1920 [3]
Record Age of the
last Olympic
water polo match
Player Men's team Pos Date of birth Date of the
last Olympic
water polo match
Ref
Oldest male Olympian 45 years, 169 days Charles Smith   Great Britain GK 26 January 1879 13 July 1924 [4]

Medalist

Record Age of receiving
the last Olympic
gold/silver/bronze
medal in water polo
Player Men's team Pos Date of birth Date of receiving
the last Olympic
gold/silver/bronze
medal in water polo
Ref
Oldest male Olympic gold medalist 41 years, 216 days Charles Smith   Great Britain GK 26 January 1879 29 August 1920 [4]
Oldest male Olympic silver medalist 41 years, 128 days Boris Goykhman   Soviet Union GK 28 April 1919 3 September 1960 [5]
Oldest male Olympic bronze medalist 37 years, 223 days Boris Goykhman   Soviet Union GK 28 April 1919 7 December 1956 [5]
Record Age of receiving
the first Olympic
gold/silver/bronze
medal in water polo
Player Men's team Pos Date of birth Date of receiving
the first Olympic
gold/silver/bronze
medal in water polo
Ref
Youngest male Olympic gold medalist 17 years, 40 days György Kárpáti   Hungary FP 23 June 1935 2 August 1952 [6]
Youngest male Olympic silver medalist 18 years, 334 days Herman Meyboom   Belgium FP 23 August 1889 July 22 1908 [7]
Youngest male Olympic bronze medalist 15 years, 306 days Paul Vasseur   France FP 10 October 1884 12 August 1900 [8]

Multiple appearances (five-time Olympians)Edit

 
Manuel Estiarte of Spain is the only water polo player to compete at six Olympic Games (1980–2000).

The following table is pre-sorted by number of Olympic appearances (in descending order), date of the last Olympic appearance (in ascending order), date of the first Olympic appearance (in ascending order), date of birth (in ascending order), name of the player (in ascending order), respectively. Last updated: 12 December 2020.

Fourteen athletes competed in water polo at five or more Olympic Games between 1900 and 2016 inclusive. Paul Radmilovic, representing Great Britain, is the first water polo player to compete at five Olympics (1908–1928).[9]

Four athletes (Manuel Estiarte, Salvador Gómez, Jesús Rollán and Jordi Sans) were all members of the Spain men's national water polo team (1988–2000). Manuel Estiarte is the first and only water polo player (man or woman) to compete at six Olympics (1980–2000).[10] Jesús Rollán is the first water polo goalkeeper of either gender to compete at five Olympics (1984–2004).[11]

Tony Azevedo of the United States is the first non-European water polo player to compete at five Olympic Games (2000–2016).[12]

Italian goalkeeper Stefano Tempesti competed at five Olympics between 2000 and 2016.[13]

Abbreviation and legend
  •     – Hosts
  • Apps – Appearances
Male athletes who competed in water polo at five or more Olympics
Apps Player Birth Height Men's team Pos Water polo tournament Period
(age of
first/last)
Medals Ref
G S B T
6 Manuel Estiarte 1961 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
  Spain FP 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 20 years
(18/38)
1 1 0 2 [10]
5 Paul Radmilovic 1886 1.80 m
(5 ft 11 in)
  Great Britain FP 1908 1912 1920 1924 1928 Does not appear 20 years
(22/42)
3 0 0 3 [9]
Dezső Gyarmati 1927 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  Hungary FP 1948 1952 1956 1960 1964 Does not appear 16 years
(20/36)
3 1 1 5 [14]
Gianni De Magistris 1950 1.85 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  Italy FP 1968 1972 1976 1980 1984 Does not appear 16 years
(17/33)
0 1 0 1 [15]
Jordi Sans 1965 1.80 m
(5 ft 11 in)
  Spain FP 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 Does not appear 16 years
(18/35)
1 1 0 2 [16]
George Mavrotas 1967 1.75 m
(5 ft 9 in)
  Greece FP 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 Does not appear 16 years
(17/33)
0 0 0 0 [17]
Salvador Gómez 1968 1.94 m
(6 ft 4 in)
  Spain FP 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 Does not appear 16 years
(20/36)
1 1 0 2 [18]
Jesús Rollán 1968 1.87 m
(6 ft 2 in)
  Spain GK 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 Does not appear 16 years
(20/36)
1 1 0 2 [11]
Tibor Benedek 1972 1.90 m
(6 ft 3 in)
  Hungary FP 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 Does not appear 16 years
(20/36)
3 0 0 3 [19]
Igor Hinić 1975 2.02 m
(6 ft 8 in)
  Croatia FP 1996 2000 2004 2008 2012 Does not appear 16 years
(20/36)
1 1 0 2 [20]
Tamás Kásás 1976 2.00 m
(6 ft 7 in)
  Hungary FP 1996 2000 2004 2008 2012 Does not appear 16 years
(20/36)
3 0 0 3 [21]
Georgios Afroudakis 1976 1.94 m
(6 ft 4 in)
  Greece FP 1996 2000 2004 2008 2012 Does not appear 16 years
(19/35)
0 0 0 0 [22]
Stefano Tempesti 1979 2.05 m
(6 ft 9 in)
  Italy GK 2000 2004 2008 2012 2016 Does not appear 16 years
(21/37)
0 1 1 2 [13]
Tony Azevedo 1981 1.85 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  United States FP 2000 2004 2008 2012 2016 Does not appear 16 years
(18/34)
0 1 0 1 [12]
Apps Player Birth Height Men's team Pos Water polo tournament Period
(age of
first/last)
G S B T Ref
Medals

Multiple medalistsEdit

The following table is pre-sorted by total number of Olympic medals (in descending order), number of Olympic gold medals (in descending order), number of Olympic silver medals (in descending order), date of receiving the last Olympic medal (in ascending order), date of receiving the first Olympic medal (in ascending order), name of the player (in ascending order), respectively. Last updated: 12 December 2020.

Eight male athletes won four or more Olympic medals in water polo. Aside from Belgian player Joseph Pletincx who won medals before World War II,[23] all were members of the Hungary men's national water polo team. Dezső Gyarmati is the first and only athlete (man or woman) to win five Olympic medals in water polo (three gold, one silver and one bronze).[14]

Legend
  •     – Hosts
Male athletes who won four or more Olympic medals in water polo
Rk Player Birth Height Men's team Pos Water polo tournament Period
(age of
first/last)
Medals Ref
G S B T
1 Dezső Gyarmati 1927 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  Hungary FP 1948 1952 1956 1960 1964 16 years
(20/36)
3 1 1 5 [14]
2 György Kárpáti 1935 1.67 m
(5 ft 6 in)
  Hungary FP 1952 1956 1960 1964 Does not appear 12 years
(17/29)
3 0 1 4 [6]
3 László Jeney 1923 1.81 m
(5 ft 11 in)
  Hungary GK 1948 1952 1956 1960 Does not appear 12 years
(25/37)
2 1 1 4 [24]
4 Mihály Mayer 1933 1.85 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  Hungary FP 1956 1960 1964 1968 Does not appear 12 years
(22/34)
2 0 2 4 [25]
5 András Bodnár 1942 1.80 m
(5 ft 11 in)
  Hungary FP 1960 1964 1968 1972 Does not appear 12 years
(18/30)
1 1 2 4 [26]
Endre Molnár 1945 1.85 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  Hungary GK 1968 1972 1976 1980 Does not appear 12 years
(23/34)
1 1 2 4 [27]
István Szívós Jr. 1948 2.02 m
(6 ft 8 in)
  Hungary FP 1968 1972 1976 1980 Does not appear 12 years
(20/32)
1 1 2 4 [28]
8 Joseph Pletincx 1888   Belgium FP 1908 1912 1920 1924 Does not appear 16 years
(20/36)
0 3 1 4 [23]
Rk Player Birth Height Men's team Pos Water polo tournament Period
(age of
first/last)
G S B T Ref
Medals

Multiple gold medalistsEdit

 
Paul Radmilovic, representing Great Britain, won three gold medals in water polo at the 1908, 1912 and 1920 Olympics.

The following table is pre-sorted by number of Olympic gold medals (in descending order), number of Olympic silver medals (in descending order), number of Olympic bronze medals (in descending order), date of receiving the last Olympic gold medal (in ascending order), date of receiving the first Olympic gold medal (in ascending order), name of the player (in ascending order), respectively. Last updated: 12 December 2020.

Ten athletes won three or more Olympic gold medals in water polo. Six players (Tibor Benedek, Péter Biros, Tamás Kásás, Gergely Kiss, Tamás Molnár and Zoltán Szécsi) were all members of the Hungary men's national water polo team that won three consecutive Olympic gold medals in 2000, 2004 and 2008.[19][29][21][30][31][32]

There are thirty-one male athletes who won two Olympic gold medals in water polo.

Legend
  •     – Hosts
Male athletes who won three or more Olympic gold medals in water polo
Rk Player Birth Height Men's team Pos Water polo tournament Period
(age of
first/last)
Medals Ref
G S B T
1 Dezső Gyarmati 1927 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  Hungary FP 1948 1952 1956 1960 1964 16 years
(20/36)
3 1 1 5 [14]
2 György Kárpáti 1935 1.67 m
(5 ft 6 in)
  Hungary FP 1952 1956 1960 1964 Does not appear 12 years
(17/29)
3 0 1 4 [6]
3 Paul Radmilovic 1886 1.80 m
(5 ft 11 in)
  Great Britain FP 1908 1912 1920 1924 1928 20 years
(22/42)
3 0 0 3 [9]
Charles Smith 1879 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  Great Britain GK 1908 1912 1920 1924 Does not appear 16 years
(29/45)
3 0 0 3 [4]
Tibor Benedek 1972 1.90 m
(6 ft 3 in)
  Hungary FP 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 16 years
(20/36)
3 0 0 3 [19]
Péter Biros 1976 1.96 m
(6 ft 5 in)
  Hungary FP 2000 2004 2008 2012 Does not appear 12 years
(24/36)
3 0 0 3 [29]
Tamás Kásás 1976 2.00 m
(6 ft 7 in)
  Hungary FP 1996 2000 2004 2008 2012 16 years
(20/36)
3 0 0 3 [21]
Gergely Kiss 1977 1.98 m
(6 ft 6 in)
  Hungary FP 2000 2004 2008 2012 Does not appear 12 years
(22/34)
3 0 0 3 [30]
Tamás Molnár 1975 1.93 m
(6 ft 4 in)
  Hungary FP 2000 2004 2008 Does not appear Does not appear 8 years
(25/33)
3 0 0 3 [31]
Zoltán Szécsi 1977 1.98 m
(6 ft 6 in)
  Hungary GK 2000 2004 2008 2012 Does not appear 12 years
(22/34)
3 0 0 3 [32]
Rk Player Birth Height Men's team Pos Water polo tournament Period
(age of
first/last)
G S B T Ref
Medals

Top goalscorers (one match)Edit

 
Despite his disability of losing the left leg below the knee, Olivér Halassy of Hungary scored seven goals in a match in 1932.

The following table is pre-sorted by date of the match (in ascending order), name of the player (in ascending order), respectively. Last updated: 1 January 2021.

Scoring seven or more goals in a water polo match is a great feat, as it has only been accomplished 11 times, by 11 players, in the history of men's Olympic tournament.

The first two Olympians to do so were Olivér Halassy and János Németh, with Hungary men's national team in Los Angeles on 8 August 1932.[33] Halassy lost his left leg below the knee when he was a boy.[34] He is the first and only amputee athlete to compete in water polo at the Summer Olympics.[35]

The most recent player to do so was Felipe Perrone, with Spain men's national team in Beijing on 18 August 2008.[36]

Four players have each netted nine goals in an Olympic match. Hungarian center forward János Németh is the first water polo player to achieve this feat.[33] On 22 October 1968, Zoran Janković of Yugoslavia became the second player to do so.[37] And Manuel Estiarte of Spain is the third player.[38] At the 2008 Games, Aleksandar Šapić of Serbia became the first player to score nine goals in an Olympic match in the 21st century.

At the 1968 Summer Olympics, László Felkai netted seven goals in the bronze medal match on 26 October 1968, helping the Hungarian team win the match.[39] A few hours later, Yugoslavia won the gold medal match over the Soviet Union after extra time, 13–11, despite seven goals scored by Aleksei Barkalov.[40][41]

Abbreviation and legend
  •   – Player's team drew the match
  •   – Player's team lost the match
  •  Team  – Host team
  • Player – Player who won the tournament with his team
  • G – Goals
  • aet – After extra time
  • ps – Penalty shootout
Male players with seven or more goals in an Olympic match
# G Player Birth Age Height L/R For Result Against Tournament Round Date Ref
1 7 Olivér Halassy 1909 23 1.55 m
(5 ft 1 in)
  Hungary 18–0   Japan Los Angeles 1932 Round-robin group 8 Aug 1932 [33]
2 9 János Németh 1906 26 1.85 m
(6 ft 1 in)
3 8 Veit Herrmanns 1946 22 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  East Germany 19–2   Egypt Mexico City 1968 Preliminary round
Group B
21 Oct 1968 [42]
4 9 Zoran Janković 1940 28 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
  Yugoslavia 17–2   Japan 22 Oct 1968 [37]
5 7 László Felkai 1941 27 1.80 m
(5 ft 11 in)
  Hungary 9–4   Italy Bronze medal match 26 Oct 1968 [39]
6 7 Aleksei Barkalov 1946 22 1.80 m
(5 ft 11 in)
  Soviet Union 11–11
11–13 (aet)
  Yugoslavia Gold medal match [40]
[41]
7 9 Manuel Estiarte 1961 22 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
Right   Spain 19–12   Brazil Los Angeles 1984 Preliminary round
Group B
1 Aug 1984 [38]
8 8 Pierre Garsau 1961 26 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  France 11–4   China Seoul 1988 Classification round
9th–12th place
30 Sep 1988 [43]
9 7 Ivan Zaitsev 1975 29 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
Right   Kazakhstan 15–7   Egypt Athens 2004 11th–12th place match 27 Aug 2004 [44]
10 9 Aleksandar Šapić 1978 30 1.88 m
(6 ft 2 in)
Right   Serbia 15–5   China Beijing 2008 Preliminary round
Group B
16 Aug 2008 [45]
11 7 Felipe Perrone 1986 22 1.83 m
(6 ft 0 in)
Right   Spain 10–6   Greece Preliminary round
Group A
18 Aug 2008 [36]
# G Player Birth Age Height L/R For Result Against Tournament Round Date Ref
 
Zoran Janković of Yugoslavia scored nine goals in a match in 1968.

The following table shows the historical progression of the record of goals scored by a male water polo player in a single Olympic match. Last updated: 1 January 2021.

Legend
  •  Team  – Host team
  • Player – Player who won the tournament with his team
Historical progression of records – most goals scored by a male player, one match
Goals Achievement Year Player Age Height L/R Men's team Date Duration of record Ref
6 Set record 1900 John Jarvis 28   Great Britain 11 August 1900 31 years, 363 days [46]
Tied record 1908 Fernand Feyaerts 27–28   Belgium 15 July 1908 [47]
Tied record 1928 Koos Köhler 22   Netherlands 5 August 1928 [48]
Tied record 1928 Herbert Topp 28   United States 8 August 1928 [49]
Tied record 1932 Philip Daubenspeck 26   United States 6 August 1932 [50]
9 Broke record 1932 János Németh 26 1.85 m
(6 ft 1 in)
  Hungary 8 August 1932 88 years, 168 days [33]
Tied record 1968 Zoran Janković 28 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
  Yugoslavia 22 October 1968 [37]
Tied record 1984 Manuel Estiarte 22 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
Right   Spain 1 August 1984 [38]
Tied record 2008 Aleksandar Šapić 30 1.88 m
(6 ft 2 in)
Right   Serbia 16 August 2008 [45]
Goals Achievement Year Player Age Height L/R Men's team Date Duration of record Ref

Top goalscorers (one tournament)Edit

 
Eraldo Pizzo of Italy scored 29 goals at the 1968 Olympics.

The following table is pre-sorted by number of goals (in descending order), edition of the Olympics (in ascending order), number of matches played (in ascending order), name of the player (in ascending order), respectively. Last updated: 23 December 2020.

Five male players have scored 25 or more goals in an Olympic water polo tournament.

Spaniard Manuel Estiarte is the first and only water polo player to achieve this feat twice. At the 1984 Summer Olympics, Estiarte netted 34 goals, setting the record for the most goals scored by a water polo player in a single Olympic tournament. Four years later, he scored 27 goals in Seoul.[10]

The most recent player to scoring 25 or more goals in a tournament was Alessandro Calcaterra, with Italy men's national team at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.[51]

Legend
  •  Team  – Host team
  • Player – Player who won the tournament with his team
Male players with the most goals in an Olympic tournament
Rk Year Player Birth Age Height L/R Goals Matches
played
Goals
per
match
Men's team Finish Ref
1 1984 Manuel Estiarte 1961 22 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
Right 34 7 4.857   Spain 4th of 12
teams
[10]
2 1968 Nico van der Voet 1944 24 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
33 9 3.667   Netherlands 7th of 15
teams
[52]
3 1968 Eraldo Pizzo 1938 30 1.87 m
(6 ft 2 in)
Right 29 9 3.222   Italy 4th of 15
teams
[53]
4 1988 Manuel Estiarte (2) 1961 26 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
Right 27 7 3.857   Spain 6th of 12
teams
[10]
2008 Alessandro Calcaterra 1975 33 1.87 m
(6 ft 2 in)
Right 27 8 3.375   Italy 9th of 12
teams
[51]
6 1968 Rubén Junco 1950 18 1.54 m
(5 ft 1 in)
26 8 3.250   Cuba 8th of 15
teams
[54]
7 1968 László Felkai 1941 27 1.80 m
(5 ft 11 in)
24 8 3.000   Hungary 3rd of 15
teams
[55]
8 1936 Hans Schneider 1909 26 22 7 3.143   Germany 2nd of 16
teams
[56]
1976 Tamás Faragó 1952 23 1.94 m
(6 ft 4 in)
Right 22 8 2.750   Hungary 1st of 12
teams
[57]
1992 Tibor Benedek 1972 20 1.90 m
(6 ft 3 in)
Left 22 7 3.143   Hungary 6th of 12
teams
[19]
1992 Manuel Estiarte (3) 1961 30 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
Right 22 7 3.143   Spain 2nd of 12
teams
[10]
2012 Andrija Prlainović 1987 25 1.87 m
(6 ft 2 in)
Right 22 8 2.750   Serbia 3rd of 12
teams
[58]
Rk Year Player Birth Age Height L/R Goals Matches
played
Goals
per
match
Men's team Finish Ref

Sources:

 
Filip Filipović scored 19 goals at the 2016 Olympics, helping Serbia win gold. He was named the Most Valuable Player of the men's water polo tournament.

The following table is pre-sorted by edition of the Olympics (in ascending order), number of matches played (in ascending order), name of the player (in ascending order), respectively. Last updated: 23 December 2020.

Hans Schneider of Germany scored 22 goals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics,[56] which stood as an Olympic water polo record for one Games until 1968, when the Dutch player Nico van der Voet netted 33 goals in Mexico City.[52]

At 18 years old, Manuel Estiarte of Spain made his Olympic debut at the 1980 Moscow Olympics, where he was the youngest-ever male top goalscorer with 21 goals. He was also the top goalscorer at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and the 1988 Seoul Olympics, with 34 and 27 goals, respectively. He was the joint top goalscorers at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics with 22 goals.[10]

Hungrian left-handed player Tibor Benedek was the joint top goalscorer at the 1992 Games with 22 goals, and the top goalscorer at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics with 19 goals.[19]

Aleksandar Šapić, representing FR Yugoslavia, was the top goalscorer at the 2000 Sydney Olympics with 18 goals. Four years later, he netted 18 goals for Serbia and Montenegro, becoming the top goalscorer at the 2004 Athens Olympics.[59]

31-year-old István Szívós Sr. scored 16 goals for Hungary at the 1952 Helsinki Olympics,[60] which stood as an age record for the oldest top goalscorer in a single Olympic water polo tournament until 2008, when 33-year-old Alessandro Calcaterra of Italy netted 27 goals in Beijing.[51]

Left-hander Filip Filipović of Serbia was the joint top goalscorer at the 2016 Olympics, with 19 goals. He netted two goals in the gold medal match, helping the Serbian team win the Olympics.[61]

Legend
  •  Team  – Host team
  • Player – Player who won the tournament with his team
Top male goalscorers by tournament
Year Player Birth Age Height L/R Goals Matches
played
Goals
per
match
Men's team Finish Ref
1900 John Jarvis 1872 28 6 1 6.000   Great Britain 1st of 7
teams
[62]
1908 Fernand Feyaerts 1880 27–28 8 3 2.667   Belgium 2nd of 4
teams
[63]
1912 Robert Andersson 1886 25 9 4 2.250   Sweden 2nd of 6
teams
[64]
1920 Erik Andersson 1896 24 10 4 2.500   Sweden 3rd of 12
teams
[65]
1924 Pierre Dewin 1894 29–30 14 5 2.800   Belgium 2nd of 13
teams
[66]
1928 Ferenc Keserű 1903 24 1.55 m
(5 ft 1 in)
10 4 2.500   Hungary 2nd of 14
teams
[67]
1932 Philip Daubenspeck 1905 26 14 4 3.500   United States 3rd of 5
teams
[68]
1936 Hans Schneider 1909 26 22 7 3.143   Germany 2nd of 16
teams
[56]
1948 Aldo Ghira 1920 28 18[a] 7[a] 2.571   Italy 1st of 18
teams
[69]
1952 István Szívós Sr. 1920 31 1.85 m
(6 ft 1 in)
Right 16 6 2.667   Hungary 1st of 21
teams
[60]
Ruud van Feggelen 1924 28 16[b] 8[b] 2.000   Netherlands 5th of 21
teams
[70]
1956 Petre Mshvenieradze 1929 27 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
11 7 1.571   Soviet Union 3rd of 10
teams
[71]
1960 Fred Tisue 1938 21 1.75 m
(5 ft 9 in)
12 7 1.714   United States 7th of 16
teams
[72]
Aurel Zahan 1938 22 1.83 m
(6 ft 0 in)
12 7 1.714   Romania 5th of 16
teams
[73]
1964 Nico van der Voet 1944 20 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
10 7 1.429   Netherlands 8ht of 13
teams
[52]
1968 Nico van der Voet (2) 1944 24 1.86 m
(6 ft 1 in)
33 9 3.667   Netherlands 7th of 15
teams
[52]
1972 Carlos Sánchez 1952 20 1.71 m
(5 ft 7 in)
18 9 2.000   Cuba 9th of 16
teams
[74]
1976 Tamás Faragó 1952 23 1.94 m
(6 ft 4 in)
Right 22 8 2.750   Hungary 1st of 12
teams
[57]
1980 Manuel Estiarte 1961 18 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
Right 21 8 2.625   Spain 4th of 12
teams
[10]
1984 Manuel Estiarte (2) 1961 22 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
Right 34 7 4.857   Spain 4th of 12
teams
[10]
1988 Manuel Estiarte (3) 1961 26 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
Right 27 7 3.857   Spain 6th of 12
teams
[10]
1992 Tibor Benedek 1972 20 1.90 m
(6 ft 3 in)
Left 22 7 3.143   Hungary 6th of 12
teams
[19]
Manuel Estiarte (4) 1961 30 1.78 m
(5 ft 10 in)
Right 22 7 3.143   Spain 2nd of 12
teams
[10]
1996 Tibor Benedek (2) 1972 24 1.90 m
(6 ft 3 in)
Left 19 8 2.375   Hungary 4th of 12
teams
[19]
2000 Aleksandar Šapić 1978 22 1.88 m
(6 ft 2 in)
Right 18 8 2.250   FR Yugoslavia 3rd of 12
teams
[59]
2004 Aleksandar Šapić (2) 1978 26 1.88 m
(6 ft 2 in)
Right 18 8 2.250   Serbia and Montenegro 2nd of 12
teams
[59]
2008 Alessandro Calcaterra 1975 33 1.87 m
(6 ft 2 in)
Right 27 8 3.375   Italy 9th of 12
teams
[51]
2012 Andrija Prlainović 1987 25 1.87 m
(6 ft 2 in)
Right 22 8 2.750   Serbia 3rd of 12
teams
[58]