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List of magazines in Italy

In Italy there are many magazines.[1] The number of consumer magazines was 975 in 1995 and 782 in 2004.[2] There are also Catholic magazines and newspapers in the country.[3] A total of fifty-eight Catholic magazines was launched between 1867 and 1922.[3] From 1923 to 1943, the period of the Fascist Regime, only ten new Catholic magazines was started.[3] The period from 1943 to the end of the Second Vatican Council thirty-three new magazines were established.[3] Until 2010 the additional eighty-six Catholic magazines were founded.[3] The magazines had 3,400 million euros revenues in 2009 and 21.5% of these revenues were from advertising.[4]

The following is an incomplete list of current and defunct magazines published in Italy. They are published in Italian or other languages.

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "List of Italian magazines". Ciao Italy. Archived from the original on 7 October 2013. Retrieved 30 September 2013.
  2. ^ "European Publishing Monitor. Italy" (PDF). Turku School of Economics and KEA. Retrieved 5 April 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Andrea Gagliarducci (18 July 2015). "The slow demise of Catholic magazines in Italy". Catholic News Agency. Rome. Retrieved 12 October 2016.
  4. ^ Andrea Mangani (2011). "Italian print magazines and subscription discounts" (Discussion paper). Dipartimento di Economia e Management. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d Gino Moliterno, ed. (2005). Encyclopedia of Contemporary Italian Culture (PDF). London and New York: Routledge. ISBN 0-203-74849-2. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 January 2015. Retrieved 9 January 2015.
  6. ^ Roy P. Domenico; Mark Y. Hanley (1 January 2006). Encyclopedia of Modern Christian Politics. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 260. ISBN 978-0-313-32362-1. Retrieved 24 July 2015.
  7. ^ a b c d Ruth Ben-Ghiat (2001). Fascist Modernities: Italy, 1922-1945 (PDF). Berkeley: University of California Press. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 December 2014. Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  8. ^ "World Magazine Trends 2010/2011" (PDF). FIPP. Archived from the original on 21 June 2012. Retrieved 8 June 2016.
  9. ^ Sergio Luzzatto (21 October 2014). The Body of Il Duce: Mussolini's Corpse and the Fortunes of Italy. Henry Holt and Company. p. 91. ISBN 978-1-4668-8360-4. Retrieved 26 July 2015.
  10. ^ a b Leo Goretti (2012). "Irma Bandiera and Maria Goretti: gender role models for communist girls in Italy (1945-56)" (PDF). Twentieth Century Communism (4). Retrieved 13 March 2017.
  11. ^ Eric Lyman (5 March 2014). "Italian publisher unveils magazine dedicated to Pope Francis". National Catholic Reporter. Rome. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  12. ^ "Internazionale". Vox Europ. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  13. ^ "Independent Media Launched the Russian Edition of Architecture and Design Magazine Interni". Sanoma. 16 October 2007. Retrieved 4 June 2016.
  14. ^ Mark Gilbert; Robert K. Nilsson (19 September 2007). Historical Dictionary of Modern Italy. Scarecrow Press. p. 356. ISBN 978-0-8108-6428-3. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  15. ^ a b Patrick Cuninghame (2008). "Italian feminism, workerism and autonomy in the 1970s". Amnis. 8. Retrieved 20 November 2016.
  16. ^ Regina Lee Blaszczyk (3 October 2011). Producing Fashion: Commerce, Culture, and Consumers. University of Pennsylvania Press. p. 53. ISBN 0-8122-0605-3. Retrieved 21 November 2016.
  17. ^ David Forgacs; Stephen Gundle (2007). Mass Culture and Italian Society from Fascism to the Cold War. Indiana University Press. p. 102. ISBN 0-253-21948-5. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  18. ^ Penelope Morris (2007). "A window on the private sphere: Advice columns, marriage, and the evolving family in 1950s Italy" (PDF). The Italianist. 27: 304–332. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  19. ^ Stefano Franchi; Francesco Bianchini (2011). The Search for a Theory of Cognition: Early Mechanisms and New Ideas. Rodopi. p. 119. ISBN 94-012-0715-1. Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  20. ^ Veronica Tosetti (14 March 2016). "The "Soft Revolution" of young feminists in Italy". Cafe Babel. Retrieved 20 November 2016.
  21. ^ Perry Willson (7 December 2009). Women in Twentieth-Century Italy. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 33. ISBN 978-1-137-12287-2. Retrieved 20 November 2016.